NSTA RSS Feeds 

BROWSE JOURNAL ARTICLES

The Science Teacher issues for the year 2015 are currently being displayed

Switch Year:  

Switch Journal:  

Journal Cover The Science Teacher

July 2015

Ever-increasing volumes of information from sensors, satellites, cell phones, telescopes, global information systems, and social media provide unprecedented opportunities for scientists, citizens, and students to investigate complex systems. Scientific progress doesn't result from simply accumulating data. But there's no doubt that big data is revolutionizing fields as diverse as astronomy, marketing, genomics, climate science, oceanography, social science, and health care. Big data has the potential to transform science teaching and learning as well. Our students can engage in the higher-order thinking involved in analyzing and interpreting large science data sets and designing their own inquiries to discover patterns and meaning in mountains of accessible data, as authors in this issue of The Science Teacher illustrate.

Free Articles in this Journal: 0  

Articles for Purchase in this Journal: 0  
Journal Cover The Science Teacher

April 2015

This issue of The Science Teacher marks our 20th consecutive annual issue devoted to the theme of “Science for All.” Teaching strategies targeted toward a specific group almost always turn out to improve learning for all groups. And so, when this issue suggests ways to use quality graphics to support English language learners or provides ideas for using videos to engage reluctant readers, you will also discover ideas that work for all students who struggle to read science texts. Likewise, in an article describing strategies to support students with weak executive functioning skills, you will find ways to improve all your students’ organization, planning, and self-regulation abilities. High-quality teaching strategies like those in this issue benefit students well beyond the targeted groups.

Free Articles in this Journal: 0  

Articles for Purchase in this Journal: 0  
Journal Cover The Science Teacher

March 2015

The concept of energy is central to all the sciences. A clear understanding of energy is essential for life science students, especially in topics like photosynthesis, cellular respiration, ecosystems, and cellular transport. Energy transformations also are fundamental to understanding basic processes in chemistry and physics, from rusting cars and exploding dynamite to electric motors and wind turbines. In Earth and space sciences, energy drives climate, tectonic plate movements, volcanoes, earthquakes, and ocean currents. Perhaps more than any other single topic, energy provides a unifying theme that connects the sciences, technology, engineering, and mathematics in an authentic way.

Free Articles in this Journal: 0  

Articles for Purchase in this Journal: 0  
Journal Cover The Science Teacher

February 2015

It's arguable that all science learning begins and ends with obtaining, evaluating, and communicating information. We think of scientists and engineers working in the laboratory or outside during field research, but it turns out that reading and writing comprise over half the work of practicing scientists and engineers. Communicating science and engineering understanding is challenging, but the rewards are great, giving students a unique opportunity to synthesize ideas and solidify understanding. You can start by having students keep a science notebook or journal—including drawings, numbers, and words. We hope this issue inspires you to reinforce this important practice in the classroom.

Free Articles in this Journal: 0  

Articles for Purchase in this Journal: 0  
Journal Cover The Science Teacher

January 2015

Project-based learning can be an important instructional model for meeting the three-dimensional learning goals of the Next Generation Science Standards. Complex, real-world projects provide opportunities for students to deeply engage in multiple science and engineering practices—like developing and using models, constructing explanations, and engaging in argument from evidence—while learning specific disciplinary core ideas and crosscutting concepts that can be used to make sense of phenomena and design solutions to relevant problems. This issue offers a variety of examples that may inspire you to try project-based science in your own classroom.

Free Articles in this Journal: 0  

Articles for Purchase in this Journal: 0