Forums & User Community

Most Active Users This Week

View the National Leader Boards Online Now Online Advisors

Recent Posts

Implementing STEM in my classroom | Posted in STEM


I believe STEM is best implemented by allowing creativity, expression, and collaboration in the classroom. In all grades, but especially in the lower grades, I have noticed that students often learn best from each other. I would begin implementing STEM by designing activities around group work and/or students teaching each other.
In math, you can have students share how they got their answers step by step so that others can see and hear their peer's thinking and strategizing. In science, a great idea is having students work on group projects to "research" about the weather, water, and other Kindergarten TEKS. At the end of the week or lesson, the groups can share their findings with the class. I hope my ideas can help you implement STEM education in your Kindergarten classroom!

Kelsey Nason

Chem for those who do not like it | Posted in Chemistry


I think you have hit the reason for NGSS right on the head! The phenomenon approach to learning is what drives those students in the classroom. When teachers engage their students with phenomena they have a true curiosity or interest in the interest levels in the classroom drive up. Students are shifting from this rote memorization or even just learning content in isolation; to having a role and a mission of trying to figure something out. Chemistry is especially daunting in isolation. When you give students a task, then build a story around that task where now they need to know this information to complete the task. They will be more engaged. The hardest part is choosing a phenomenon that fits your students. You should figure out what are they interested in. What are things that would hook them? Once you get to know your students more you will know the types of phenomenon’s that will drive them.

Jessica Holman

Teaching for Conceptual Understanding in Science | Posted in Professional Development

We used the book for our PLC - Middle School Science in New York in the spring. Teachers found the ideas very useful and opened possibilities for some of them, trying and implementing new strategies and forms of formative assessment. The main focus was to explore the Conceptual Change Instructional Model. The plan this year is for teachers coming to the PLC for the first time to read and explore during the year in both in-person and online sessions, and those who were in the PLC last year will deepen in the discussion of their topics of interest.

Adaliz Gonzalez

Online Now (4)
Tabitha Dionne, Marie Lichte, Laura Najjar, Kathy Renfrew

Forum content is subject to the same rules as NSTA List Serves. Rules and disclaimers