Forums & User Community

  • 34 People Online
  • 10722 Topics
  • 88860 Posts

Recent Posts

NSTA's Virtual Conference - Teaching Controversial Topics | Posted in Professional Development

Hi Mary,
I have had the opportunity to participate in several virtual conferences. The most amazing part of it is getting to hear firsthand from the experts on a topic. When I attended the solar eclipse one, I was blown away by all the great information that was shared. I was so well prepared to participate in the total eclipse in Carbondale this past August because of what I learned at the virtual conference.

I also attended the Climate Virtual Conference where they had atmospheric scientists and meteorologists from NOAA (who actually study climate change) share their expertise. Then we had experienced educators share how to present engaging lessons to our students. Your brain leaves the day's conference filled to the brim with fresh new ideas.

I love going to NSTA conferences like the one coming up in Atlanta, but it is a totally different experience. The virtual conferences are such a great value for the money. All those experts on one specific topic are gathered together for the day just for us!

I am especially interested in the March 3rd virtual conference because I am looking forward to learning some new strategies for teaching controversial topics in science, AND the other emphasis, according to the overview, is about having a better understanding of the nature of science.
Hope to see you there!
Carolyn


Carolyn Mohr

Science Trips | Posted in Informal Science

We studied habitats and what animals eat. We have a place here locally called Bear Country USA. We took a tour of the facility and then the nutritionist for the animals came and showed us how they prepare the meals for the bears and other animals. There was actually a Scholastic News article about how meals are prepared at zoos or animal sanctuaries. It was perfect timing with our field trip. If you have a local zoo or animal rescue place you can ask if you can take a field trip and talk about nutrition of animals .


Brenda Velasco

Inquiry-Based Learning in Elementary School | Posted in Elementary Science

I believe that inquiry based learning is also extremely beneficial for students especially at the lower elementary grades. Like mentioned by others, this type of learning helps the students think for themselves. There are also different types of inquiry based learning, depending on how much direction you would like to give the students. If you are going to completely hand over the reins to the students this is called an open inquiry. In this inquiry the students will be in charge of coming up with a question/problem, procedure, and results/ analysis. This would be a great way to get the students to think creatively and problem solve. However, for the younger students it could be hard for them to come up with everything on their own. So, for this age group I would recommend a structured inquiry. For this, you as the teacher would come up with the question/problem, and the procedure for everyone to do. Then the students would have to analyze and reason as to why these things occurred. In my science methods class we did an experiment called "dancing raisins for our structured inquiry. We were given the question of, "Why do raisins, when added to a cup of sparkling water float to the top of the cup?" We were also given the procedure of putting five raisins in two cups with the same amount of liquid, one with sparkling water and one with regular water. Then it was our job to analyze why it was that the raisins floated in the sparkling water. I think that this would be a great idea of a structured inquiry for younger elementary grades. You can structure it, but still gets them thinking!


Kennedy Carber

Most Active This Week

View the National Leader Boards

Online Now (34)
Morgan Alexander, Ruthie Carlyle, Taylor Charlton, Grant Colquitt, Carey Cooper, Allison Crow, Cody Earley, Kristina Edwards, Megan Fitzpatrick, Rahima Furbee, Paula Gourley, Brenna Grant, Claire Johnson, April Jordan, Gabe Kraljevic, Tami Merry, Elizabeth Orlandi, Adriana Pineda, Laura Jane Posner, Kathryn Powell, Rosalinda Ruelas, Chloe Samples, Sara Sawtelle, Alison Scagnelli, Taylor Scott, April Shelton, Victor Swatzyna, Naimah Urfi, Emma Vargo, Lacey Walker, Ashley Walton, Tim Young, Megan Young, Tasha Zismer

Forum content is subject to the same rules as NSTA List Serves. Rules and disclaimers