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Animals in the classroom? | Posted in Life Science

I am a student intern working at school now. When I become a teacher of record, I would like to set up a small aquaponics system in my classroom. I would need aquarium, gravels, plants, water pumps, etc. I am thinking about using Glofish that are genetically engineered, solar powered pump, and stations where students can measure pH level, Nitrate, Nitrate, Ammonia, and oxygen levels. This will help students to understand alternative farming systems and energy. This is something that I would like to plan out through this year!


Yookyung Chung

The Drake Equation | Posted in Earth and Space Science

The Drake equation is not directly used by scientists in their research. Rather it is often used when talking about life in the universe to non-scientists, such as in astrobiology courses, as James mentioned. One of the keynote addresses I sometimes deliver is on astrobiology, and I discuss the Drake equation quite a lot, as it relates to many fascinating topics regarding the development of life in the universe, where we would expect to find life, and how common we might expect life to be.

The purpose of the Drake equation is not to give a precise answer to that fundamental question -- How many technological civilizations are in our galaxy? -- but to form the basis of discussions by presenting various types of information that we would need to know, if we wanted to answer that question.

So basically the Drake equation is a statement that "stimulates intellectual curiosity about the universe around us, for helping us to understand that life as we know it is the end product of a natural, cosmic evolution, and for helping us realize how much we are a part of that universe." (https://www.seti.org/drakeequation)

What the equation and the search for life has done is focus science on some of the issues concerning life in the universe, specifically the development of life starting with chemical processes, the development of multi-cellular life, and the development of intelligence.

Matt


Matthew Bobrowsky

Kindergarten activities | Posted in Early Childhood

From the semester I spent with kindergarten students, I have found that they are very hands-on. I would suggest maybe exploring the environment around them and relating it to the sorts of science they will be learning about. For instance, taking them on a walk around the building and talking about living vs. nonliving things they see, weather, etc. The more they can dive into it, the more I would think they would a foundational interest in science.


Ellen Watters

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