Chemistry

Nature's chemistry

Mon Jan 09, 2012 2:34 PM

Hello,
Our organization, the Biomimicry 3.8 Institute, is working on a series of chemistry labs that explore nature's chemistry and the ways organisms manage chemical processes without extreme heat or toxic by-products.
I am curious as to whether there is an appetite for this kind of resource, and if so, what the best way(s) to disseminate this material would be?
Thank you,
Grace

Grace Decker
Grace Decker
110 Activity Points

Tue Jan 10, 2012 12:46 PM

Grace
This is an intriguing idea. I teach a class of predominantly per-nursing students and an always looking for biologically relevant chemistry examples.

Pamela Auburn
Pamela Auburn
68505 Activity Points

Tue Jan 17, 2012 10:14 PM

I was thinking about this today in context of food decay. I thought, this would be a great way to teach chemical reactions because it is very relevant to students.

Brandy Stewart
Brandy Stewart
7755 Activity Points

Fri Jan 20, 2012 10:38 AM

What about using it with forensic chemistry as well? As someone said already, the chemistry of decay would be interesting. I would love to see some of this stuff developed for young children in elementary. They love stuff like that and it might be a good hook to lock them into science.

Adah Stock
Adah Stock
101470 Activity Points

Wed Jan 25, 2012 9:15 AM

I am the director of the local regional science fair and I get teachers and students asking me all the time for ideas for science fair projects. Your resource sounds like a good idea as a starting point for science fair projects. I think it would be a great addition to the science resource world.

Betty Paulsell
Betty Paulsell
48540 Activity Points

Wed Jan 25, 2012 10:00 PM

Check with the state science teacher chapters. There is a NSTA listserve for them. It might be a point of contact and they usually have state listserves they can use to pass the information on with.

Susan German
Susan German
31090 Activity Points

Tue Jan 31, 2012 4:18 PM

Excellent Idea Adah.

Scholars are so intrigued with Forensics, yet I never push this as a topic for our annual Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics (S.T.E.M.) Fair.

Thanks for the suggestion.

LA

Lorrie Armfield
Lorrie Armfield
51418 Activity Points

Sun Feb 05, 2012 3:55 AM

I have often thought about this in terms of the chemical breakdown of everyday items from rubber bands to electronics. I live in Hawaii. My school is literally right next to the ocean. Very few rooms have air conditioning, so we live at the outside conditions. The heat, humidity, and salt in the air all contribute to an increase in the chemical breakdown of just about everything. It would be interesting to develop a way to measure the rate of decomposition of selected items in rooms with air conditioning compared to rooms without air conditioning, and even compare these findings to measurements taken in different states.

David Heldt
David Heldt
150 Activity Points

Sat Feb 18, 2012 7:29 PM

I teach a Botany course. I include a unit on chemical reactions in plants, such as hormone responses. Additional resources on these processes would be very helpful. I agree with Susan that a listserve would be the best way to get out information.

Renee Hashimoto
Renee Hashimoto
1595 Activity Points

Tue Feb 28, 2012 12:06 PM

Grace,

You might find this site presenting a HS Green chemistry curriculum informative
http://www.beyondbenign.org/K12education/highschool.html
I had a look at some of the experiments - I love the blackberry solar cell!

Pamela Auburn
Pamela Auburn
68505 Activity Points

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