STEM

STEM Education

Fri Apr 29, 2011 9:58 AM

I have been following this blog and thought that it might be of interest to others

Educator Eric Brunsell writes in this blog about the increased emphasis being placed on engineering as part of K-12 science, technology, engineering and math education, and recommends resources for developing engaging engineering lessons for students. He also looks at the principles found in a 2009 report that suggested engineering lessons should emphasize design, incorporate math, science and technology skills, and promote engineer-like thinking that includes characteristics such as collaboration and creativity.
http://www.edutopia.org/blog/science-technology-engineering-...oteBook%29


Pamela Auburn
Pamela Auburn
68500 Activity Points

Fri Apr 29, 2011 11:01 AM

I'd like to see more engineering models adapted to ALL school subjects--What I'm seeing in classwork is an emphasis on quantity v quality. Students need to become more critical about their own work product, and understand that writing is an iterative as well as creative process.Students need to be taught how to think recursively and expansively, rather than turn something in to get it over with, which is what I see in my travels as a substitute teacher. Thanks for this blog post.

Therese Houghton
Therese Houghton
7210 Activity Points

Fri Apr 29, 2011 5:51 PM

Hi Pam and Theresa and thread readers,
I just wanted to connect this thread with the one already going on the topic of STEM - under STEM Careers. A lot of excellent contributions have been made there about STEM education, so readers of both threads will have two places to check out.
Carolyn

Carolyn Mohr
Carolyn Mohr
79588 Activity Points

Mon May 16, 2011 5:29 PM

Terry:
I am with you on the problem of more "quantity and less quality." I also agree that STEM should be in ALL subject just as you say. I believe we need to provide more opportunities to self evaluate their own work and then have their work peer reviewed and finally teacher reviewed.
There is a site that would be helpful for that:
http://www.cdl.org/resource-library/articles/self_eval.php
I think self evaluation is essential for a person (student) to grow.

Adah Stock
Adah Stock
101470 Activity Points

Thu Jun 02, 2011 1:40 PM

Are any of you aware that there are free webinair provided through Discovery Education and the Seimen's StEM Academy that teachers can view and use in the classroom along with resources.
http://www.siemensstemacademy.com/

Adah Stock
Adah Stock
101470 Activity Points

Thu Jun 02, 2011 8:20 PM

I teach early learners (1st to 2nd grade) and my students are "English Language Learners". I had Eric Brunsell as a professor at Montana State. I am wondering how to encourage small children to pursue science. I know about inquiry, yet need to know how to build this in young learners.

Douglas Lymer
Douglas Lymer
2850 Activity Points

Fri Jun 03, 2011 2:31 PM

Douglas posits, "I am wondering how to encourage small children to pursue science. I know about inquiry, yet need to know how to build this in young learners."
Hi Douglas, I just finished reading an article called Unlocking the Power of Observation
It provided ideas for improving inquiry for K-2 students and especially mentioned ELL learners. As we encourage our younger students to behave like scientists in the classroom, we can provide opportunities to experience STEM careers concurrently. I put together a collection of resources called STEM Careers Elementary that may provide some ideas for accomplishing this. Whether it is using the Planetary Puzzles from the Planetary Images NASA External Resource or inviting a scientist to visit one's classroom and share 'scientist stories', every time a teacher purposely plans ways to incorporate STEM careers and STEM curriculum, students gather new information that may help determine future career choices. What are others' ideas for encouraging small children to pursue science?

Carolyn Mohr
Carolyn Mohr
79588 Activity Points

Thu Jan 19, 2012 9:30 PM

Hi everyone.

I am currently part of our school's STEM team of educators employing both project-based and team teaching in directing students learning. We are fortunate to have our county participate in state-wide project in bring the level of awareness of students in STEM and eventually create a culture of STEM thinkers. The team try to create quarterly projects where to center the curricular dynamics and get the students taught in a classroom in a subject by various educators from disciplines like Biology, Algebra, Technology and Engineering, etc. We invite scientists from NASA from time to time in order to provide more experts' involvement in the conduct of the project based learning process. One of the lesson modules that we are currently developing in a Biology class is the application of Tidal Wave Energy as an alternative energy. Water is being investigated. Energy is being touched. We compute using mathematical models the energy produced by kinetic flow of water. We device electrical circuits and other small scale replications of actual gadgets in the field. And finally we develop our own working system that integrate all the lessons we have learned for the previous meetings. Of course the main thing is to develop the STEM thinking among the students, that everything is connected, and that this is how it will be in the future if we have to lead with STEM knowledge.

I hope there's something new I have imparted here.

Ronaldo Relador
Ronaldo Relador
45280 Activity Points

Thu Feb 16, 2012 8:40 PM

To Carolyn Mohr,
I have been working on ways to improve teaching science to K-2 students and I am having a lot of fun with it. The young students come to the science lab which generally starts with a tour around the lab to see the various exhibits- a microscope with an intriguing slide (this week a butterly wing), insects in magnifying boxes, fur, snake skin, an antler, pine cones, fossils, shells, rocks, etc. At the end of the 5 - 7 minute tour, they come to the carpet and I ask "Do you have any questions or comments about what you saw today?" From there all hands go up. We talk and share ideas and questions, then we get into a lesson related to some artifact in the room. Right now we're talking about butterflies. So the microscope slide is a launching place. The other day, one boy came in and sat down and said, "Everytime I come here I think I want to be a scientist!" What I am trying to create is an inquiry-stimulating classroom and in some ways, it is working!

Linda Martin
Linda Martin
1645 Activity Points

Thu Feb 16, 2012 11:54 PM

I have realized that there are so many evolving systems in the academic field today as technology advances. The AVID program which I have been teaching in the Early College Academy where students are encouraged to undertake tutorials is a very effective way of improving students learning in the core subjects. Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics are among some the subjects students are engaged in the small learning environment. Tutorial support in learning with guidance the STEM education or courses at all levels, elementary, or secondary institutions through Advancement Via Individual Determination is the way forward.

Mohamed A. Bereteh
Mohamed A. Bereteh
50 Activity Points

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