Life Science

Garden Activities

Wed Apr 23, 2014 9:48 PM

Our school has a great garden! However, I would like to utilize it more in my teaching. Has anyone created any type of lessons centered around life science in a garden?

Stacia

Stacia Brown
Stacia Brown
550 Activity Points

Sat Nov 21, 2015 7:05 PM

I haven't been to the garden, but I have been to the nature preserve, and if you wanted to you could creatively make many lessons work in that environment. If you don't mind the outdoors, its basically a "mini everglades" in our own backyard. The hike is beautiful, as well as great exercise, and educative. By the end of the tour, assuming you take it with a guide, not only do you know what a slash pine, live oak, cherry pepper, and a strangler fig is etc., but you can also tell the difference between them. I took the tour with my SCE 4310 class and I really enjoyed the hike. I do not recommend it if your not into the outdoors or moving much.

Michael Gonzalez
Michael Gonzalez
475 Activity Points

Thu Apr 07, 2016 2:19 PM

Have you seen the resources from the Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center? They are great! https://www.wildflower.org/teachers/
Project Wild http://www.projectwild.org/resources.htm and National Wildlife Federation? http://www.nwf.org/What-We-Do/Kids-and-Nature/Educators/Teacher-Tools.aspx

Hope these help!

Frieda Lamprecht
Frieda Lamprecht
1485 Activity Points

Thu Apr 07, 2016 2:25 PM

I like the idea of having the students write poetry to display in the garden. You could even have them write shape poems in the forms of different flowers, plants, vegetables, fruits, and insects.

Dallas Aguilar
Dallas Aguilar
830 Activity Points

Mon Apr 24, 2017 8:35 PM

It is nice to know that your school has a great garden! Growing up, I remember my school had a great garden too! However now a day, it is hard to find a school that has a great garden now. All we see is plain empty fields with just a few playground to keep the children occupy. One activity that the students can do is to Harvest a plant from the garden. As a lesson plan, students can learn how to properly use harvesting methods and work together to begin harvesting plants or vegetable as a class and watch their garden grow!

Michelle Nguyen
Michelle Nguyen
1185 Activity Points

Thu Apr 24, 2014 5:47 PM

Hi Stacia,
How wonderful that you have a garden to use as an outdoor teaching station! All kinds of science concepts come to mind. Of course it does depend somewhat on what you grow in the garden.
I had a butterfly garden at my school for a few years. We were trying to establish a habitat for our state insect, the Monarch butterfly. In that type of garden you could discuss symbiotic relationships, life cycles of insects, habitats and ecosystems, etc.

If you spend time with your students discussing garden design and companion plants, etc. Students could design their garden layout, measure between plantings to establish optimum space requirements and then place compatible plants together. For example, beets and lettuce are considered companion plants because the beet has deep roots while the lettuce has shallow roots (therefore they do not complete for the same soil space). The beets grow taller and provide shade for the more fragile lettuce leaves that are not as tolerant of full sun.

You could grow flowering plants that produce noticeable fruits like pole beans or squash and
discuss the life cycle of a plant. This would involve teaching pollination, fertilization and plant parts and functions. You could include a flower dissection.

How about using your garden to help teach photosynthesis or the water cycle (to include
transpiration)? Or how about discussing soil pH or nitrate levels? Or perhaps you could discuss what plants require in order to survive and thrive (sunlight, water, CO2 gas from the air, nutrient from the soil, etc.
These are some ideas that are coming to mind.
Hope this helps.
Carolyn

Carolyn Mohr
Carolyn Mohr
78475 Activity Points

Thu Apr 30, 2015 11:45 PM

I agree that gardens are a great way to incorporate science into the classroom. I like all the different examples of how to make connections to the garden and use all year long. Another great thing about having a school garden is that it can be used many many different grade levels.

Candace Warden
Candace Warden
520 Activity Points

Thu Dec 03, 2015 11:22 AM

Great ideas!! Thanks for sharing :) 

Andrea Velazquez
Andrea Velazquez
1600 Activity Points

Fri Dec 09, 2016 9:25 PM

These are awesome ideas!!

Kelly Thomas
Kelly Thomas
890 Activity Points

Sun May 07, 2017 4:39 PM

Wow! this is valuable ideas is incredible what concepts you can enhance by designing a garden. The school where I am doing my students teaching each grade has their own little space to plant and create a garden. I will share this information with my cooperative teacher.
Thank you!

Viridiana Castro
Viridiana Castro
810 Activity Points

Sun May 07, 2017 4:39 PM

Wow! this is valuable ideas is incredible what concepts you can enhance by designing a garden. The school where I am doing my students teaching each grade has their own little space to plant and create a garden. I will share this information with my cooperative teacher.
Thank you!

Viridiana Castro
Viridiana Castro
810 Activity Points

Thu Apr 24, 2014 10:39 PM

I have developed a number of lessons for use in the schoolyard. Here's some from my Learning Center public collection, including a free chapter from my NSTA Press book, Outdoor Science: A Practical Guide. Enjoy, and give me feedback!


Your text to link here...

Steve Rich
Steve Rich
550 Activity Points

Sun May 07, 2017 4:47 PM

I just add to my library, How Clean is the River and Birds, Bugs and Butterflies Science Lesson for your outdoor classroom. I tried to open your word lesson plan but I couldn't there is another was I can have access to it? Thank you!!

Viridiana Castro
Viridiana Castro
810 Activity Points

Mon Apr 28, 2014 10:31 PM

Thank Steve! These lessons will come in handy when I start my first student-teaching!

Austin Arredondo
Austin Arredondo
1540 Activity Points

Tue Apr 29, 2014 7:32 PM

Hi Stacia and others,
Here is a collection of items from the Learning Center of Backyard Habitats.
~patty


Backyard Habitats: Real World Inquiry Collection
(11 items)
How_to_Create_A_Butterfly__Hummingbird_Garden_by_Pat_Sutton.pdf
     -User Uploaded Resource
RecommendNectarPlants_Sutton.pdf
     -User Uploaded Resource
Bluebird Adventures
     -Journal Article

Patricia Rourke
Patricia Rourke
45830 Activity Points

Tue Apr 29, 2014 7:33 PM

a collection on butterflies


Butterflies, Ecology, Life Cycles, & Methods Collection
(10 items)
The Human Side of Butterflies
     -Journal Article
The Early Years: Collards and Caterpillars
     -Journal Article
Let Monarchs Rule
     -Journal Article

Patricia Rourke
Patricia Rourke
45830 Activity Points

Sat Apr 15, 2017 5:10 PM

Thank you so much for sharing this wealth of information Patricia!

~Michelle

Michelle Alley
Michelle Alley
2220 Activity Points

Tue Apr 29, 2014 7:35 PM

using birds as a gateway to science inquiry


Study Birds as Gateways to Inquiry Collection
(0 items)

Patricia Rourke
Patricia Rourke
45830 Activity Points

Tue Apr 29, 2014 7:36 PM

a collection of resources from the Learning Center on school gardens


School Gardens Collection
(9 items)
The Early Years: Collards and Caterpillars
     -Journal Article
The Early Years: An Invertebrate Garden
     -Journal Article
Creating a Schoolyard Mini-Garden
     -Journal Article

Patricia Rourke
Patricia Rourke
45830 Activity Points

Sat Apr 15, 2017 5:15 PM

Wow! This is great information. I really appreciate you sharing this with everyone. Especially for those of us that are new to teaching!! This will come in handy to help integrate new ideas for fun activities.

Thank you!

~Michelle

Michelle Alley
Michelle Alley
2220 Activity Points

Wed Sep 02, 2015 1:27 AM

Having students write poetry that could later be displayed throughout the garden would be a great cross-curricular activity. They would use their knowledge of imagery, personification etc. and write poems related to insects, pollination, ecology, and/or plants.

Robert Harvey
Robert Harvey
935 Activity Points

Sun Nov 08, 2015 6:27 PM

That sounds like a great idea. I like integrating subjects with other subjects. 

Marisela Garza
Marisela Garza
2525 Activity Points

Fri Nov 20, 2015 9:29 PM

I love this idea! I think it would make poetry be less abstract and more achievable for kids! 

Angeles Rivero Loyola
Angeles Rivero Loyola
1450 Activity Points

Sun Apr 03, 2016 11:21 PM

Great idea Harvey! Poetry can be a powerful tool for young children. My teacher loves to incorporate poetry in his class. 

Marisela Morales
Marisela Morales
980 Activity Points

Wed Oct 28, 2015 1:48 PM

I really like this! I need to do an integrated lesson for my methods class and I think I am going to do this. It is authentic and fun but at the same time it has a purpose and it is connected to my TEKS and objective. 
Thanks guys! 

Maria Andrea Cobo
Maria Cobo
1780 Activity Points

Sun Nov 08, 2015 6:27 PM

Definitely. I agree. 

Marisela Garza
Marisela Garza
2525 Activity Points

Tue Nov 10, 2015 10:02 PM

I wish the elementary school I was observing had a garden. I think it's very beneficial for the kids. Last semester when I was observing another school they had a after school garden club and the kids loved planting and learning about plants. 

Thy Van
thy van
1565 Activity Points

Tue Nov 10, 2015 10:41 PM

Yes, I agree. Children love gardening and nature . Plus, it is a hands-on experience. 

Marisela Garza
Marisela Garza
2525 Activity Points

Mon Nov 23, 2015 8:57 PM

http://betterlesson.com/lesson/640863/plant-parts-leaves

Here is a wonderful lesson that has the students learning about diffrent kinds and structures of leaves. Thomas Young is the teacher who gets all of the credit for this lesson. The link can also give you other life science lesson he has to offer. Just in case the link does not work, here it is:

Big Idea:
Today your students will look at the leaves of a plant. They will learn about the types of leaf structures and the names of the parts that make up the leaf.

Setting the stage:
The students start by watching a video about simple and compound leaves.  They then go on a hunt to find examples of each.  The class will then sort them into the two categories. The lesson will end with a in depth talk about the components of a leaf.  
Our district expects students to understand that a plant is a system that goes through a natural cycle and the parts help the plant survive and reproduce. By focusing on the parts and needs of a plant, I can teach them how the parts have a role that helps a plant get the things it needs to survive.  The unit will end with the class spending 4 days int eh school garden and applying their learned knowledge to the work being done in the garden.  
[table][tr][td]S1-2:31[/td]
[td]Students demonstrate their understanding of Reproduction by…


  • Drawing and labeling the stages of development in the life of a familiar plant.


[/td]
[/tr]
[/table]

Engage:
The students gather on the carpet and face the Smart board.  I introduce the "leaf" and have them watch a video that introduces the simple and compound leaf.  
"We are going to study another plant part today.  It is the leaf.  There are two classifications of leaves.  There is a simple leaf and a compound leaf.  I want to start by having you watch this quick video about the two types."
Once the video is over, I want to reiterate the terms compound and simple leaves.  The reason being is that the students will use the explore section to go out and find examples of each type.

Explore:  
The students now head outside to find examples of each type of leaf.  They are asked to find two examples of compound leaves and two examples of a simple leaf.  They will use these in the discussion part of the lesson.
"Now I want you to go outside and find four different leaves.  You will work with your science partner to find two compound leaves and two simple leaves.  You can bring a pair of scissors and a bag for collecting your leaves."
"Once you are done collecting, we will meet back in the classroom for a science circle discussion."

I take the students to the playground. Our playground has many trees and a field where a variety of leaves can be found.

Explain:
I gather the students back on the carpet and have them bring their leaves and science notebooks.  I lead a discussion about the leaves they collected and we sort all of them as a class.
"I am going to make a t-table on this piece of chart paper.  One side will be labeled compound leaves and the other will be labeled simple leaves.  I would like you to place your leaves in the appropriate side of the table.  Please don't lay your leaves on another group's leaves.  This way everyone can see all of the leaves in each category."
I give the students a few minutes to do this and then call their attention the the completed table.
"I would like you and your partner to look at how the leaves have been sorted.  Do you think that each leaf is in the right category.  I want you to discuss your thoughts with your partner.  Be ready to share your thoughts but also be able to explain your reasoning."
By having the students explain their reasoning, I am able to to tell if they understand the difference between the two.  Even if the class sorts them all correctly, the students will have to explain why they are sorted in the appropriate categories.  
"I would like you to take out your science notebooks and set it up for today's entry.  Our focus today is what (leaves)?  I would like you to create the same t-table that we created here and then draw three of the leaves from each category.  You can use colored pencils to enhance your drawings."

Elaborate:
Advanced Preparation:  You will need a copy of the science handout Leaves.  I have taken a picture of this resource because I don;t have permission to include it as a printable black-line master.  

[b][i]"I want to explore the str

Kate Zuelke
Kate Zuelke
885 Activity Points

Fri Dec 11, 2015 12:52 AM

I love this lesson. I love that the students get to go outside and interact with nature to achieve the lesson's content. I think physicallly handling the leaves will help the students understand the content much better than if they were to just look at pictures or solely a video.

Erin Jasso
Erin Jasso
380 Activity Points

Fri Dec 11, 2015 12:52 AM

I love this lesson. I love that the students get to go outside and interact with nature to achieve the lesson's content. I think physicallly handling the leaves will help the students understand the content much better than if they were to just look at pictures or solely a video.

Erin Jasso
Erin Jasso
380 Activity Points

Sun Apr 03, 2016 11:23 PM

Great lesson, Kate! 

Marisela Morales
Marisela Morales
980 Activity Points

Tue Apr 12, 2016 9:28 PM

Thank you for this resource!

Zachary Maltbia
Zachary
905 Activity Points

Tue Jul 12, 2016 10:46 AM

Awesome! Thank you for sharing!

Laura Turek
Laura Turek
1820 Activity Points

Fri Dec 04, 2015 9:56 AM

I was able to observe the nature preserve at my university FIU and learn about how important it is for students to learn through inquiry activities. I was able to do an exploration with my previous Science class in which we placed some food traps in different soil atmospheres. We them observed the different types of ants, and the quantity in each of the atmospheres. It was a fun and interesting activity. I believe you could do this in schools as well. It might just have to be rethought to testing whether shade affects ant populations etc, since there isn't that big of a variety in soil.

Scarlett Ramirez
Scarlett Ramirez
1835 Activity Points

Fri Dec 04, 2015 12:37 PM

I am currently taking a methods of science course and I am learning a great deal about Inquiry based lessons. 

Adriana Castillo
Adriana Castillo
1015 Activity Points

Fri Dec 04, 2015 1:23 PM

Hi Stacia,
Possibly having students do a nature walk and teaching them a lesson on plant survival. Hope this helps! 

Jessica Kim
Jessica Kim
370 Activity Points

Sat Dec 05, 2015 12:09 AM

The elementary school that I am at has an amazing garden. However I do not feel it is used to its potential. I would love to see more of an integration between all subjects-something along the lines of how we consume/produce food and the plant life cycle. Any suggestions?  

Cynthia Garza
Cynthia Garza
1860 Activity Points

Thu Dec 10, 2015 12:50 AM

Garden activities are so great! Recently, my peers and I have been discussing how gardens would be a great vehicle to use in educating kids about healthy food. It is amazing, as well as appalling how little young children know about different types of vegetables and fruits or where they come from. Garden activities concerning food and health or the plant life cycle would be great.

Margot Jacobs
Margot Jacobs
630 Activity Points

Thu Dec 10, 2015 10:59 PM

THank you for sharing these awesome garden activities, I can't wait to try some out!

Aubree Kiessling
Aubree Kiessling
1365 Activity Points

Fri Dec 11, 2015 1:08 AM

The school I am at has a garden and it is a great space. Unfortunately, it is not utilized and often forgotten about. The one time I visited the garden was for the kids to look at it and use the different rows to form math problems. This is such a missed opportunity to teach a school full of over weight children where food comes from, how to grow it, how to harvest it, and how to prepare it. Beyond that it can teach them community, economics, chemistry and so much more!!! Gardens in schools should be mandatory! I cannot imagine even one logical or valid reason to not having a flourishing garden at school. 

Edith Heppe
Edith Heppe
405 Activity Points

Sat Dec 12, 2015 8:15 PM

I feel like we have a similar situation at my school. There is such a pull to stick to our district-provided curriculum that there seems to be little time for gardening. Still, I see great potential for learning. We just recently got a grant and installed a butterfly garden. Students and the community worked together to make it happen. It was a very satisfying and successful experience. Now, I'm determined to make sure that we are not "finished" with this project. I want very much to get my science committee involved in finding ways to use the garden in our grade levels' curriculum. We've been provided with curriculum from the National Wildlife Federation, so I'm confident it is possible - if we can find the will and the time to make it happen. 

Michael Massad
Michael Massad
3010 Activity Points

Tue Feb 02, 2016 4:03 PM

How exciting! How could you incorporate gardening activities for your science lessons on a low budget or with limited outside space? How do schools in large cities use this?

Courtney Browning
Courtney Browning
1230 Activity Points

Sat Apr 22, 2017 10:26 PM

Hey Courtney,

Growing up in Latin America in a very urban area, we were still able to have gardening, plant, and ecosystem lessons even with fewer resources than a typical classroom in the United States.

An activity that I remember doing when I was in 1st grade, which can be built upon and made more complex, is growing a bean in a plastic cup with the cotton as the "soil." For elementary school children, it introduces the concept of plant growth as an iterative process that as time progresses, the organism that arises is ever more sophisticated. It also shows how water is critical to growth of all organisms, as if a student forgets to water their plant, it will wither or grow not as quickly as others'. This can then be tied to our own bodies, by asking students what happens when they do not drink water for a long time and explaining that like plants, we need water to live.

In middle school, the concept of photosynthesis can be added to this activity by varying the amount of light that reaches the beans. Students can formulate hypotheses on what they believe will happen when plants receive varying amounts of light and set up their corresponding experiments. This will also beautifully tie in the scientific method. Depending on the classroom culture, socio-economic implications can arise in at this stage as well. Students will notice that in the most general sense possible, plants to photosynthesize require relatively high intensity and frequent light exposure. As a result, plants need a combination of high water and light inputs, causing irrigation systems in very hot and arid places such as Arizona to exist in order to maximize food production. This often implies that water is diverted from other uses, and who makes these decisions and who benefits and who is placed at a disadvantage is a deeply contentious issue. Evolution can be brought into the lesson by mentioning that some plants can be adapted to live in more extreme conditions, such as the cacti.

At the high school level, plant development can be incorporated upon all the previous layers aforementioned. After a plant physiology lesson, students can appreciate how the cotyledons form, and as the bean is a eudicot, two seed leaves emerge from the seed. Likewise, students can notice how due to the suppression of auxin by sunlight, the plant grows towards the light as the portion less exposed to light grows faster than the more sun-exposed side.

Victoria Glynn
Victoria Glynn
20 Activity Points

Mon Apr 11, 2016 5:43 PM

I know that one teacher on our team uses the garden to show the children how everything is connected. The birds stop by the bird bath and may eat some insects, the caterpillars use the leaves on the plants to begin the transformation to a butterfly and so on. 

Jasmin Delgado
Jasmin Delgado
840 Activity Points

Tue Apr 19, 2016 9:39 PM

The students, can take a walk through the garden and write and draw pictures of plants they observe in their science journals. Also the students can observe different animals that they see as well. Another activity that could be done, is a lesson on the life cycle of a plant.

Rebecca Hackim
Rebecca Hackim
635 Activity Points

Mon Apr 25, 2016 3:38 AM

I think it's even more important to teach students about climate change and just get them to play outside! It is important to establish appreciation for their food and surroundings so that when they grown up they'll be conscious of all the environmental issues. I hope you get to utilize the garden a lot!

Milena Tintcheva
Milena Tintcheva
20 Activity Points

Tue Jun 21, 2016 10:43 AM

In some of the classrooms I have been in we have tied poetry lessons into gardens and created sensory poems. Also we took a nature walk through the garden and did science observations. Also the students created models of how the garden and animals around the area were both beneficial for each other. Another lesson that could be done is the importance of gardens to our environment and also gardens can be related to health (food) topics. There are so many benefits of having a garden in the school yard and then creating topics that align! Students love creating gardens because they feel a sense of ownership and responsibility to take care of it. Also it is fun for the students to go out and observe the changes of their garden over time.

Shelby Rhodes
Shelby Rhodes
805 Activity Points

Tue Jul 05, 2016 7:49 PM

In classrooms I have been at I have seen teachers teach about life cycles starting with a seed and then moving on to other life cycles of animals and so on. Sensory poems or shape poems can be a fun and interesting lesson to connect. Having students make observations on what they see can be a great activity to do. Having students make connections between plants, animals, and people so they can learn that we all need certain things to live. Gardens are a great thing to have in a school. Students can take time to just sit and enjoy nature as well as learn from it. Gardens give students a sense of responsibility because they want their garden to grow. The school I am currently in has a garden that the third graders take care of and I have worked with them a couple of times. I would definitely like to get my first graders involved because there are so many things they can learn from it. Just connecting it to poems, making observations, having them take ownership and responsibility. Giving them the opportunity to grow and start a life. Garden create endless opportunities for students.

Jasmin Romo
Jasmin Romo
975 Activity Points

Thu Jul 07, 2016 2:30 PM

The school I'm student teaching at just created a wonderful garden this past year. I think it would be awesome for your students to experiment in the garden. They could create a hypotheses based on their studies of soil. Even as an adult, I was surprised about the complexity of soil and its impact on plant life (especially how wonderful worms can be!) I know fast plants are great to work with in a short period of time.

Kaylee Reese
Kaylee Reese
645 Activity Points

Wed Dec 07, 2016 11:34 PM

Some of my student teaching revolved around the gardens in the various schools I was in! We made interactive notebooks where students could make observations, take notes, write questions, etc. I think the interactive notebook was very beneficial because all of the information was in a single location. The notebooks allowed the students to really work alone and enjoy a more inquiry based lesson!

Katrice Trego
Katrice
755 Activity Points

Fri Dec 09, 2016 12:37 PM

I think there are many things you can do to add cross curricular activities throughout your class with the garden. Depending on the grade you work with, you could have writing pieces with the garden. The writing could be as simple as words to explain observations once a week to a detailed explanation with predictions and how to take care of plants. You could do cooking activities with what you create and incorporate math and fractions to that.

Summer Robinson
Summer Robinson
595 Activity Points

Sat Dec 10, 2016 9:34 PM

For my Science Methods course, which is part of my Early Childhood Education license, we have worked with learning gardens at multiple different schools (and with multiple different grade levels). At any grade level, the direct observations the students make of their gardens never fail to serve as fantastic venues for scientific discussion and exploration. From garden components and environmental influences to the minute details of the vast processes of life you can find in a garden, the possibilities of garden-based learning activities are literally endless. For example, at a kindergarten, twenty-one different teacher candidates came up with twenty-one completely different lessons for their students.

Ethan Schoenlein
Ethan Schoenlein
510 Activity Points

Wed Feb 01, 2017 7:38 AM

Garden activities can involve playing games like sack race, Treasure hunt etc or you can do gardening.
http://ukessaywriters.blogspot.com/

Steve Collins
Steve Collins
50 Activity Points

Sat Feb 04, 2017 7:35 PM

I like the idea of using a garden to write stories or poetry.

Jessica Cronin
Jessica Cronin
435 Activity Points

Fri Apr 14, 2017 9:18 AM

Hi!

I recently did a science lesson with a first grade class and I used the school garden to introduce the topic of parts of a plant. There were many weeds and plants that weren't necessarily part of the garden, so I had the students pick one and pull it out of the ground completely. I did this so that the students were able to observe a whole plant and identify the four major parts. I then had the students draw their plant in their science notebooks, labeling all four parts. It worked out great and the students really enjoyed picking the plants out themselves! It got them involved and engaged in the lesson.

Sanovia Sanicharan
Sanovia Sanicharan
2325 Activity Points

Sat Apr 15, 2017 8:47 PM

I have observe some classes that they do gardening all of the time. They also do activities outside. I think the students were looking at insects around the garden and after they would learn about different parts. Also looking at temperature or you could do life cycle or things a plant needs like natural resources.

Virginia E Lopez
Virginia E Lopez
915 Activity Points

Sun Apr 16, 2017 8:41 PM

You can do activities such as life cycle of flowers. My school has a garden too, and we have gone outside to observe the flowers and to name their parts. I guess it all depends on what grade level.

Yvis Lauzurique
Yvis Lauzurique
4135 Activity Points

Mon Apr 17, 2017 4:11 PM

This may be far fetched for some schools and grade levels, but my students maintain a classroom garden that consist of herbs. This is a great opportunity to introduce a lesson on agriculture. After the herbs have sprouted and ready to harvest, we use them in a chosen food dish. The students love the idea of growing and consuming their food.

Ariel Roy
Ariel Roy
500 Activity Points

Wed May 17, 2017 2:53 PM

A garden is a great opportunity for kids to learn where our food comes from, plant life, insects and even as creative inspiration for art or writing. Our school doesn't have a garden right now but I'm hopeful that eventually we will and the kids will be able to see the process the plant goes through to produce it's fruit.

Sally Jones
Sally Jones
30 Activity Points

Sun Jun 25, 2017 8:00 PM

Great discussion. You can always do DNA extraction and analysis.

Nina Stiell
Nina Stiell
3770 Activity Points

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