Tue Dec 13, 2016 1:59 PM

I made a lesson  plan and taught a lesson on "Bubbles" for my science class. I started the lesson by asking my class "If they have ever seen bubbles in water or played with bubbles?' Next the students (my peers)  took turns trying to blow bubbles with regular water. After taking turns, I asked the question " why didn't the bubbles with regular water worked?. After doing these hands on experiments, I went into details and explained the key terms of a bubble. The lesson was then expanded to the surface tension in liquid.

Joeline Garlo
Joeline Garlo
1160 Activity Points

Wed Jan 04, 2017 10:26 PM

Engineering is Elementary has a great unit on Bubbles. It's geared more toward engineering bubble wands but does touch on cohesion, adhesion, and the surface tension of bubbles. It was developed by the Boston Museum of Science. We use their curriculum to train teachers for engineering clubs that are held after school. We are working with 3rd, 4th, and 5th graders. It is free for teachers, all you have to do is sign up and you can download their teacher's edition and the student journals. You can purchase the materials through them or buy them yourself locally.

http://www.eie.org/eie-curriculum

PS I just started creating a Pinterest Board today dedicated to bubbles. ;)

Pamela Dupre
Pamela Dupre
81437 Activity Points

Thu Jan 05, 2017 9:50 AM

Thank you for sharing. I like these ideas.

Brooke Reynolds
Brooke Reynolds
1201 Activity Points

Thu Jan 05, 2017 10:52 AM

You're welcome, Brooke. Do you do something similar with your students or anything that you could share with us?

Pamela Dupre
Pamela Dupre
81437 Activity Points

Thu Jan 05, 2017 1:01 PM

I do the one with the penny where you add water droplets until they break the surface tension. We use this to practice with their science process skills and keeping accurate records and working together as a group.

Attachments

Penny_lab.pdf (0.02 Mb)

Brooke Reynolds
Brooke Reynolds
1201 Activity Points

Thu Jan 05, 2017 1:08 PM

Yes, the penny lab is fun. I have a separate set of pennies that have been dipped in soapy water. Once the students finish the first trial and they record how many drops they were able to put on the penny, I have them turn in that penny and get a "new" one. It's very interesting to see them struggle to drop water on the soapy pennies and offer up their ideas of why it isn't working. I do tell them after a few minutes of them being unsuccessful. That is my favorite way to teach elementary students about variables.
Someone I work with shared that they do the penny lab with water, and then they used milk! I hadn't thought of trying different liquids.

Pamela Dupre
Pamela Dupre
81437 Activity Points

Thu Jan 05, 2017 1:10 PM

I like those ideas and yes variables is another area we focus on. They are always amazed how many drops of water a penny can hold.

Brooke Reynolds
Brooke Reynolds
1201 Activity Points

Sun Dec 10, 2017 12:05 PM

I really like that you had them attempt to blow bubbles with regular water to give everyone the same experience so they all had a similar starting point to base their ideas off of. I am a pre service teacher and this is something we talk about a lot in my science methods class. Great work!

Mallory Van Winkle
Mallory Van Winkle
3190 Activity Points

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