Matt Bobrowsky

I do a lot of public speaking, professional development workshops, teaching, and writing. Topics include astronomy, physics and physical science, the process of science, science vs. pseudoscience, astrobiology, science teaching, and -- new -- a presentation on the 2017 solar eclipse. Author of the "Phenomenon-Based Learning" series of books on teaching physical science (published by NSTA Press). See http://www.linkedin.com/in/mattbobrowsky

Affiliation

Delaware State University

Social Media
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DrMattB
Skype Name
mbobrowsky

Recent Posts by Matt

Sun Apr 15, 2018 1:14 PM in Teaching Controversial Topics in Science
That could be a good approach, Isis. You just have to make sure that the "findings" you present are from reliable scientific sources. Also, when students finally do reach conclusions, make sure they are consistent with the findings, i.e., are correct. They're entitled to their own opinions, but not to their own facts. It's part of our job as science educators to make sure that students not onl...

Mon Apr 09, 2018 7:01 AM in Teaching Controversial Topics in Science
Carili, I strongly suggest that you urge your sister to NOT have students debate evolution vs. creationism.  I’m attaching an article on student debates of controversial issues, which anyone who is considering having a debate should look at. There are several problems with having students debate about evolution: (1) It reinforces the misconception that evolution is controversial in the s...

Tue Apr 03, 2018 8:19 AM in Changes of Matter
The balloon on the bottle is a great idea.  Just one clarification: "When the bottle is placed inside the room (or refrigerator for quick results) the air takes up less space...." It's not that the air takes of less space.  A gas will fill whatever volume it is in.  The point here is that when you heat a gas, its pressure increases.  So when you heat the air in the bottle, the pressure in...





Recent Public Collections by Matt


Phases of the Moon

2 Resources

This activity allows students to observe how the changing phases of the moon correlate with the moon's position in the sky. Using this information, students formulate a hypothesis for explaining the changing phases of the moon. Note that this activity also provides an example of the correct use of the word "hypothesis" as a possible explanation of some observed phenomenon (not a guess at the outcome of an experiment).



Teachers_Notes_For_Moon_Phase_Activity.pdf
Type: User uploaded resource



Moon_Phase_Activity_Handout.pdf
Type: User uploaded resource