Alexandria Twichell

Hello, My name is Alexandria Twichell! I am currently a pre-service teacher from Kent State University majoring in Integrated Science with a concentration in Life Sciences. I am completing my student teaching this year at GlenOak High School in a Freshman Honors Physical Science STEM class.

Location

OH

Affiliation

Kent State University

Recent Posts by Alexandria

Sun Nov 19, 2017 5:55 PM in Unique Labs for Forces and Motion
When teaching the topics of forces and motion within the physical science classroom, are there any go to labs that are extremely impactful and memorable for students? I really want my students to experience this topic first hand since there is the capability to do so. I am on a block schedule and see the same set of students for 40 minutes in the morning, and then the same set of students in the a...

Sun Nov 19, 2017 5:43 PM in Fun Activities to Teach the Topic of Waves
I am a preservice teacher in an honors physical science classroom. In a couple of weeks I will be taking over my classroom for full time student teaching and will be covering the physics related curriculum in physical science. Specifically for the topic of "waves" I was wondering if anyone had any memerable activities or lessons that they use with this topic to help students understanding. I remem...





Recent Reviews by Alexandria


Tue Nov 21, 2017 12:20 PM
5 Resources and Human Impact: Grade 9-12
This SciGuide will be extremely useful when teaching students about the topic of sustainability. I thought the 4 categories of "Addressing Resource Use," "Environment as a System," "Environmental Degradation," and "Impact of Technology on..." were logical and a good way to build on from one topic to the next. I love the lesson plan titled "Where did all the water go." Having students research about the town they are in and use web resources about water consumption based on their towns population is great real world data these students can relate to. Having them go on an investigation about something that so personally relates to their own lives will be extremely memorable. I believe making students more aware of their own community is of high value. I also really enjoyed the lesson plan about human population growth. The visual representation using the water and food coloring when discussing birth and death rates makes a very big concept more feasible for the students. I also liked having groups conduct individual research about factors that affect human population growth rates and give a presentation to the class. Not only does this give the teacher a break in the classroom, but allows students to practice their presentation skills. The grading rubric attached to this project is also great. Rubrics are a great way to provide students with expectations before they even start a project, and also as a way of giving feedback when they are complete. Lastly, I think teaching how technology impacts the human population growth is more important than ever to get across to our students. With living in a technology dependent society, seeing the impacts of our actions are vital. There isn't a class that goes by where I see a student on his/her phone. It is the world we live in and a very relevant topic to teach about. I am also in a STEM community at my school that has a history class embedded into it. I can easily see myself teaming up with my fellow STEM teachers and creating an entire unit about topics discussed in this SciGuide that would be relevant to all of our curriculum.


Tue Nov 21, 2017 12:20 PM
5 Resources and Human Impact: Grade 9-12
This SciGuide will be extremely useful when teaching students about the topic of sustainability. I thought the 4 categories of "Addressing Resource Use," "Environment as a System," "Environmental Degradation," and "Impact of Technology on..." were logical and a good way to build on from one topic to the next. I love the lesson plan titled "Where did all the water go." Having students research about the town they are in and use web resources about water consumption based on their towns population is great real world data these students can relate to. Having them go on an investigation about something that so personally relates to their own lives will be extremely memorable. I believe making students more aware of their own community is of high value. I also really enjoyed the lesson plan about human population growth. The visual representation using the water and food coloring when discussing birth and death rates makes a very big concept more feasible for the students. I also liked having groups conduct individual research about factors that affect human population growth rates and give a presentation to the class. Not only does this give the teacher a break in the classroom, but allows students to practice their presentation skills. The grading rubric attached to this project is also great. Rubrics are a great way to provide students with expectations before they even start a project, and also as a way of giving feedback when they are complete. Lastly, I think teaching how technology impacts the human population growth is more important than ever to get across to our students. With living in a technology dependent society, seeing the impacts of our actions are vital. There isn't a class that goes by where I see a student on his/her phone. It is the world we live in and a very relevant topic to teach about. I am also in a STEM community at my school that has a history class embedded into it. I can easily see myself teaming up with my fellow STEM teachers and creating an entire unit about topics discussed in this SciGuide that would be relevant to all of our curriculum.


Tue Nov 21, 2017 12:19 PM
5 Resources and Human Impact: Grade 9-12
This SciGuide will be extremely useful when teaching students about the topic of sustainability. I thought the 4 categories of "Addressing Resource Use," "Environment as a System," "Environmental Degradation," and "Impact of Technology on..." were logical and a good way to build on from one topic to the next. I love the lesson plan titled "Where did all the water go." Having students research about the town they are in and use web resources about water consumption based on their towns population is great real world data these students can relate to. Having them go on an investigation about something that so personally relates to their own lives will be extremely memorable. I believe making students more aware of their own community is of high value. I also really enjoyed the lesson plan about human population growth. The visual representation using the water and food coloring when discussing birth and death rates makes a very big concept more feasible for the students. I also liked having groups conduct individual research about factors that affect human population growth rates and give a presentation to the class. Not only does this give the teacher a break in the classroom, but allows students to practice their presentation skills. The grading rubric attached to this project is also great. Rubrics are a great way to provide students with expectations before they even start a project, and also as a way of giving feedback when they are complete. Lastly, I think teaching how technology impacts the human population growth is more important than ever to get across to our students. With living in a technology dependent society, seeing the impacts of our actions are vital. There isn't a class that goes by where I see a student on his/her phone. It is the world we live in and a very relevant topic to teach about. I am also in a STEM community at my school that has a history class embedded into it. I can easily see myself teaming up with my fellow STEM teachers and creating an entire unit about topics discussed in this SciGuide that would be relevant to all of our curriculum.