Ocean's Effect on Weather and Climate: Changing Climate

Science Object

Science Objects are two hour on-line interactive inquiry-based content modules that help teachers better understand the science content they teach. This Science Object, co-developed between NOAA and NSTA, is the fourth of four Science Objects in the Ocean’s Effect on Weather and Climate SciPack. It explores how Earth’s climate has changed in the past and how it may change in the future. Climate change may occur as a result of changes in Earth's surface, atmosphere, and oceans. Such changes may be abrupt (such as gas and dust from volcanic eruptions or asteroid impacts) or may occur over very long times (such as changes in landscape or increase in carbon dioxide levels in the atmosphere). Even relatively small changes in atmospheric or ocean content and/or temperature can have widespread effects on climate if the change lasts long enough. Since the industrial revolution, the concentration of greenhouse gases in the atmosphere has increased at an unprecedented rate. Though climate change and changes in the composition of the oceans and atmosphere are natural, present modifications far exceed natural rates.

Grades
  • Elementary
  • Middle

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Reviews (12)
  • on Wed Sep 03, 2014 5:35 AM

I really enjoy Science Objects. In 1-3 hours, the Ocean's Effect on Weather and Climate: Changing Climate Science Object will help me re-learn, refresh, or learn for the first time some critical science concepts I will have to know to obtain my Science Educator credentials. I appreciate that I can complete them at my own pace, and that, if used as park of a SciPack, I have access to a content expert to go to for help. The NSTA Learning Center Science Objects are very beneficial! Not only will they enrich my teaching, the knowledge will enrich my life.

Naomi Beverly  (Marietta, GA)
Naomi Beverly (Marietta, GA)

  • on Tue May 17, 2011 6:20 PM

Even if you understand the elements of climate change, this scipack presents statistics gathered from NOAA and NASA that will deepen your understanding of climate change. The history of climate change, the current data trends and the future predictions are all examined in this informative scipack. The student misconceptions addressed were also a huge asset to my instruction planning.

Angelika Fairweather  (Bradenton, FL)
Angelika Fairweather (Bradenton, FL)

  • on Thu Nov 11, 2010 10:27 AM

This Science Object does a nice job of building a case for climate change based on data. Great introduction to the topic of climate change with focus limited to science. This resource is most appropriate for teachers who want to begin developing a background; teachers of high school classes will want to delve into additional resources.

Jennifer Rahn  (Delafield, WI)
Jennifer Rahn (Delafield, WI)

  • on Thu Sep 08, 2016 3:18 PM

This resource was a good source of arguments supporting climate change. Unfortunately the topic is still being debated which only hurts our climate even more. This source could be provided to a "non-believer" to maybe help change an opinion. All of the points in this article are vast while provided a strong argument for climate change.

Brian S
Brian S

  • on Tue Sep 06, 2016 9:53 AM

This SciPack and Science Object is a great review of weather, climate, sun’s energy, the differences between water and land masses, and the effect the ocean has on climate change. This science object also covers the effects of carbon dioxide on the oceans and the long term effects of the climate. I also like that the SciPack includes diagrams and a glossary section filled with important vocabulary that is related to these topics.

Kaitlyn Houck
Kaitlyn Houck

  • on Sat Sep 26, 2015 3:15 PM

The article was very interesting. I especially enjoyed reading about the paleoclimate record. The natural sedimaents in the lakes, rivers, and ocens help scientist determine what the weather or climate was like years ago. This is the most accurate data that can be used to make predictions about future weather. I also enjoyed reading about the Ice Cores. The ice cores are layers on glaciers. The ice cores remind me of the rings on a tree trunk. For example, a scientist can tell information about the age and history of the tree trunk by the rings and scientists can make suggestion on climate and an area based on the ice core layers.

Linda Howard
Linda Howard

  • on Sat Sep 26, 2015 3:15 PM

The article was very interesting. I especially enjoyed reading about the paleoclimate record. The natural sedimaents in the lakes, rivers, and ocens help scientist determine what the weather or climate was like years ago. This is the most accurate data that can be used to make predictions about future weather. I also enjoyed reading about the Ice Cores. The ice cores are layers on glaciers. The ice cores remind me of the rings on a tree trunk. For example, a scientist can tell information about the age and history of the tree trunk by the rings and scientists can make suggestion on climate and an area based on the ice core layers.

Linda Howard
Linda Howard

  • on Mon Aug 05, 2013 3:38 PM

I'm very pleased to say that this section does a very nice job laying out some of the issues related to how climates can change. I would have liked to see more on the energy budget of the planet as part of the description, but I liked it and was glad I reviewed it.

Todd E  (Otego, NY)
Todd E (Otego, NY)

  • on Thu Feb 21, 2013 9:41 PM

I found this object to be very well written with good transitions and suitable diagrams and animations. I am no expert on climate change but now I feel like I have a good understanding that I can share with students.

Christina Crawley
Christina Crawley

  • on Wed Dec 14, 2011 2:27 PM

This science object reviews the effect the ocean has on climate change. It reviews the effect carbon dioxide has on the oceans and the long term effects of the climate.

Brian Ruckdeschel
Brian Ruckdeschel

  • on Wed Dec 14, 2011 2:25 PM

This was a great overview of weather, climate, sun's energy, heating earth's surfaces and the differences between land and water masses. My only drawback was that so much was offered that I need time to absorb all that was learned, especially the vocabulary towards the end of the segment.

Laura Dickey
Laura Dickey

  • on Thu Oct 15, 2015 4:44 PM

Ocean's Effect on Weather and Climate has been a very interesting Sci Pak to read. I was able to learn about sea levels are rising and oceans are becoming warmer. Longer, more intense droughts threaten crops, wildlife and freshwater supplies. From polar bears in the Arctic to marine turtles off the coast of Africa, our planet’s diversity of life is at risk from the changing climate. Climate change poses a fundamental threat to the places, species and people’s livelihoods WWF works to protect. To adequately address this crisis we must urgently reduce carbon pollution and prepare for the consequences of global warming, which we are already experiencing.

Aisha Burchfield  (Covington, GA)
Aisha Burchfield (Covington, GA)


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