Resource Image Solar System: A Look at the Planets
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Details

Type of Resource: Science Object
Average Rating: Rating
 based on 22 reviews
Publication Title: None
Location:
Date:
Pages:
Grade Level: Elementary School, High School, Middle School

Description

Science Objects are two hour on-line interactive inquiry-based content modules that help teachers better understand the science content they teach. This Science Object, co-developed between NASA and NSTA, is the second of four Science Objects in the Solar System SciPack. It explores the similarities and differences in the planets that make up our solar system. Each planet moves around the Sun in the same direction in a nearly circular orbit, though each planet has its own unique orbital period and speed. The planets vary in size, surface and atmospheric composition, and surface features. In orbit around the planets, we find a great variety of moons, flat rings of rock and ice debris, and/or artificial satellites. Features of many of the planets and their moons show evidence of formation and evolutionary processes similar to those that occur on Earth. These processes include earthquakes, lava flows, erosion, and changes in the atmosphere.

Ideas For Use

Discussions

Getting to Know the Solar System
Posted in Earth and Space Science by Adah Stock on Tue Apr 12, 2011 10:39 AM

Ladies: This is great news that your students enjoyed learning about the solar system. I am glad you joined the discus...

Additional Info

Science Discipline: (mouse over for full classification)
Planets
Intended User Role:Elementary-Level Educator, High-School Educator, Middle-Level Educator, Teacher
Educational Issues:Inquiry learning, Professional development, Teacher content knowledge, Teaching strategies

Technical

Resource Format:
Size: KB
Installation Remarks:
Requirements:


National Standards Correlation

This resource has 4 correlations with the National Standards.  
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This resource has 4 correlations with the National Standards.  
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  • Earth Science
    • Earth in the solar system
      • The earth is the third planet from the sun in a system that includes the moon, the sun, eight other planets and their moons, and smaller objects, such as asteroids and comets. (5-8)
  • Process Standards for Professional Development
    • Research-Based
      • Address teachers' needs as learners and build on their current knowledge of science content, teaching, and learning. (NSES)
    • Design
      • Introduce teachers to scientific literature, media, and technological resources that expand their science knowledge and their ability to access further knowledge. (NSES)
    • Learning
      • Build on the teacher's current science understanding, ability, and attitudes. (NSES)

State Standards Correlation

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User Reviews

Hlepful
  Judy Avellaneda on November 10, 2015
  I found this to interesting and helpful

A Look at the Planets
  Kizzy Amos on October 17, 2015
  A Look at the Planets Taking a closer look at the Science Object on Planets really intrigued me. It was interesting to learn that J. Titius observed a pattern for the five known planets from which he created a formula for to calculate planetary orbits. Just as Kepler and Newton’s work intrigued him; his work intrigued the interest of others such as William Herschel who discovered a new planet in 1781 called the Georgium Sidus.; one that I had never heard of actually. I learned that Georgium Sidus was renamed Uranus, which is the name I am more familiar with. It’s amazing to think of the intelligence of mankind and how their interest led them to develop Spacecraft’s that would go as far as the moon successfully to get pictures for us to view that we would not ordinarily be able to see without Earth-based telescopes or robotic spacecraft’s . I had not really thought about just how similar Earth and Mars were until taking a closer look at both planets in the Science Pak. In looking at the Earth and Mars comparison made me realize why there have been quite a few visits there and will be many more. Hmmm interesting! We have come a long way since the early days of using naked eye observations and Earth bound telescopes. I’m curious to know the new discoveries 20 years from now.

That last frontier !
  Gerard Latimore on October 15, 2015
  Space has always been an often curiosity to us from Earth. This science object shows that we have always been looking at the stars trying to figure out what is happening in science. I liked how this article shows how they ruled out different theories. This tends to relate to other areas of science too. Moreover, as technology continues to grow our ability to explore space gets better. In the section, titled a new view shows how well we are able to view space now vs. only a few years ago.

Solar Systems
  Sheri Smith on October 15, 2015
  This Science Object looked at the traits of planets in our Solar System. They discussed planets common features and discussed terrestrial and Jovian (gaseous) planets. They highlighted information regarding size, composition, shared characteristics including, their moons, and their evolutionary processes while highlighting and illustrating Earth’s uniqueness in the Solar System. I enjoyed the interactive activities, check understanding and graphics.

I Love Science Objects!
  Naomi Beverly (Marietta, GA) on September 3, 2014
  I really enjoy Science Objects. In 1-3 hours, the Solar System: A Look at the Planets Science Object will help me re-learn, refresh, or learn for the first time some critical science concepts I will have to know to obtain my Science Educator credentials. I appreciate that I can complete them at my own pace, and that, if used as park of a SciPack, I have access to a content expert to go to for help. The NSTA Learning Center Science Objects are very beneficial! Not only do they enrich my teaching, the knowledge enriches my life as well!.

Great Article
  Andrea H on July 30, 2012
  Great information on the solar system.

Perfect amount of background
  Laura on February 25, 2012
  This gave me just the right amount of background on the Solar System so that I feel I can answer my third graders' questions without having to check online. Just right. Thank you.

Check this one out!!!
  Anthony O'Bannon on February 19, 2012
  A great way to start into a study of the planets and early planetary theory!

Terrestrials vs Gas Giants
  Lorrie Armfield (Laurel, MD) on December 8, 2011
  This is an excellent source for reviewing information as it pertains to the inner and outer planets of our solar system. From the small, dense terrestrial planets with rocky surfaces, to the much larger and more massive jovian planets, NSTA presents the material in a way to actively engage even the most apprehensive of learners. An added addition is the inclusion of the now ‘dwarf planet’ Pluto and its moon Charon. I especially like the videos and the pictures taken from various telescopes. The matching activity is definitely a bonus.

Planets
  JeRita Humphrey on October 15, 2015
  In this Science Object looked at the traits of planets in our Solar System. It exposed the students to the unique qualities of planets. The use of graphics and interactive pieces allows for students to explore the basics of planets. I found this very useful for my understanding as well.

Galaxy
  Charnita W on October 15, 2015
  This SciPack was interesting because it traced the beginning of the exploration of space and the advancements that science has made especially after the invention of the telescope. We have been able to find out information about the planets because of the improvement in technology and the interest in life (or lack thereof) beyond earth.

Solar System: A Look at the Planets
  Aisha Burchfield (Covington, GA) on October 15, 2015
  Solar System: A Look at the Planets has taught me that each of the planets has a unique characteristic.From Earth the other planets of our solar system look like roaming stars, but thanks to telescopes and spacecraft we know these pinpricks of light are actually worlds unto themselves, many with moons that are just as fascinating as they are.

Solar System
  Bianca Jones on October 15, 2015
  This Science Object is a high level look at the planets. The explanation of the Titus-Brode rule may be difficult for some elementary students to understand. At the same time, it is a great way to bring in math. I did enjoy the discussion of the history of the universe along with the images. The interactive “Journey to the Planets” gave a great description of the individual planets. It would be a great resource for students to do research on individual planets. This was a great resource for anybody who needs more background information on the planets.

Planets
  Charnita W on October 15, 2015
  The information presented in this SciPack is current and names Pluto as a dwarf planet instead of a planet. This SciPack also gives a rationale for how planets are grouped based on similar composition and structure. I like the pictures of the planets that were taken and included.

Solar System
  Felicia A on October 15, 2015
  This SciPack looked at the characteristics of the different planets in the Solar System. It also gave good visuals to help teach the science concept. It was interesting to read how the images became more visible after space was explored. The planet characteristics/traits were more visible and detailed.

Solar System
  Adriane Woods on October 15, 2015
  This review was very informative. Reading this review has given me some great ideas to incorporate in my unit on the Solar System. The charts and pictures were great and very informative on the planets as it relates to comparing and contrasting them, the planet characteristics, and the atmospheric condition of the planets. I enjoyed the math integrations as well.

Solar System
  Papillon (Atlanta, GA) on October 15, 2015
  The SciPack on the Solar System was very informative. The specific details provided in comparing and contrasting the different planets would be a great resource to use in instruction or professional development of teachers. For example, Figure 3.1 gives an excellent visual of each planet’s location and characteristics. I also believe the misconceptions listed are helpful for planning lessons on the solar system.

Earth and other planets
  Linda Howard on September 26, 2015
  It is interesting the information from 1959 (the photo of the moon) and the change in Pluto's status in 2006. The pictures of the planets or photographs have changed over the years. These changes are evident because of the lack of information gained from scientists. For example, there has been little or no photos about Pluto. Is this the reason for the dwarf status. I grew know the 9 planets. I think the robot vs human subject is important in the article. Although there is a need for robots it can never take the place of human intelligence.

Good
  Kelly (Brewster, NY) on January 19, 2012
  I'll be using pieces of this to help create my lessons. It was helpful.

Good for Beginning Solar System Understanding
  Kate Geer (Louisville, CO) on October 11, 2010
  This is a great resource to introduce teachers to the planet in the solar system. It gives good background information on each planet. It also have lots of visual images and charts to organize content. It discusses Pluto's change of status to a dwarf planet as well.

The Planets
  Tanya Barrett on October 15, 2015
  This sci pack explores the similarities and differences in the planets that make up our solar system. Each planet moves around the Sun in the same direction in a nearly circular orbit, though each planet has its own unique orbital period and speed. Each of the planets vary in size, surface and atmospheric composition, and surface features. In orbit around the planets, we find a great variety of moons, flat rings of rock and ice debris, and/or artificial satellites. Features of many of the planets and their moons show evidence of formation and evolutionary processes similar to those that occur on Earth. These processes include earthquakes, lava flows, erosion, and changes in the atmosphere. The worlds of our solar system come in all shapes, sizes, and colors. Red-eyed Jupiter, ringed Saturn, and frigid Uranus and Neptune are giant gassy globes containing nearly all of the matter in the solar system. These Jovian planets, or gas giants, are huge worlds of air, clouds, and fluid that may have no solid surfaces no matter how deep you go. Everything else in the solar system is just rock, ice, and dust. The largest rock balls are known as the terrestrial planets: Mercury, Venus, Earth, and Mars, with our Moon usually considered part of the club, and now Vesta is applying for membership. Earth is the biggest of all the rocky worlds. While the sci pack is interesting some of the information is very technical. I did recall quite a bit from previous lessons focused on the solar system.

More Information on Solar System
  Shereen Zimmerman on October 15, 2015
  This review was interesting. The pictures from the satellite were interesting and showed the details about planets. I found it interesting that astronomers thought it was only five planets at first. I also thought it was interesting how the technology changes and reveals more data about space.