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NSTA Virtual Conference: NGSS Practices in Action

Event Details and Agenda

In this NSTA virtual conference participants attended a series of live web sessions via Blackboard Collaborate. Each session featured content from content and pedagogical experts and concluded with a live chat discussion among participants.


The day began with an opening general session and be followed by three breakout sessions. Participants came together again for a closing general session. All educators who registered for the virtual conference have access to the archive recordings of all presentations and all resource collections.



Saturday, November 15, 2014
10 a.m. – 6 p.m. ET / 9 a.m. – 5 p.m. CT / 8 a.m. – 4 p.m. MT / 7 a.m. – 3 p.m. PT

Each presentation ended with 20 minutes of live chat discussion among participants. After each session, 10 minutes of transition time were provided to allow participants to log in to the next session.

Session type Topic and Presenters Session Descriptions
Opening general session
10:00 a.m. ET
9:00 a.m. CT
8:00 a.m. MT
7:00 a.m. PT
Welcome and Introductory Presentation
David L. Evans, National Science Teachers Association
Brian Reiser, Northwestern University
Resource Collection
David Evans welcomed participants and discussed the importance of the Next Generation Science Standards (NGSS) in improving STEM education. Brian Reiser set the stage for the day by describing the central feature of NGSS: Students engaging in science and engineering practices to make sense of disciplinary core ideas and crosscutting concepts.
Live chat discussion:
11:00 a.m. ET
10:00 a.m. CT
9:00 a.m. MT
8:00 a.m. PT
   
Transition time:
11:10 a.m. ET
10:10 a.m. CT
9:10 a.m. MT
8:10 a.m. PT
   
Breakout A (choose one)
11:25 a.m. ET
10:25 a.m. CT
9:25 a.m. MT
8:25 a.m. PT
Modeling
Cynthia Passmore,
University of California, Davis School of Education
Resource Collection
Cynthia Passmore illustrated how engaging students in the practice of modeling can be the centerpiece of instruction and lead them to deeper understanding of a disciplinary core idea.
  Explanation and Argumentation
Jonathan Osborne,
Stanford University
Resource Collection
Jonathan Osborne explained why argument is a central practice of science and provide examples of how student discourse promotes effective science instruction and how explanation and argumentation are essential features of that discourse.
  Engineering
Mariel Milano, Orange County Public Schools
Resource Collection
Mariel Milano focused on engineering practices, explaining how they are similar to yet different from science practices and how students can engage in them to lean core ideas in life, Earth, and physical science.
Live chat discussion:
12:40 p.m. ET
11:40 a.m. CT
10:40 a.m. MT
9:40 a.m. PT
   
Transition time:
12:55 p.m. ET
11:55 a.m. CT
10:55 a.m. MT
9:55 a.m. PT
   
Breakout B (choose one)
1:10 p.m. ET
12:10 p.m. CT
11:10 a.m. MT
10:10 a.m. PT
Elementary
Christina Schwarz, Michigan State University
Resource Collection
Christina Schwarz showed how students in the elementary grades are able to meaningfully engage in the practices and how doing so promotes understanding of important ideas in science.
  MS/HS Life Science
Ravit Golan Duncan, Rutgers University
Resource Collection
Ravit Golan Duncan provided examples of how the practices can be used in life science contexts.
  MS/HS Earth/Space Science
Ann Rivet, Teachers College Columbia University
Resource Collection
Dr. Rivet discussed the multiple ways that Earth scientists engage in investigations and reasoning about evidence to understand Earth's processes and history, and how those methods are related to the range of science practices called for in the NGSS. She presented several classroom examples of strategies to integrate science practices and Earth science disciplinary concepts through student engagement with authentic modes of inquiry.
  MS/HS Physical Science
Joe Krajcik, Michigan State University
Resource Collection
Joe Krajcik illustrated how practices and core disciplinary ideas in physical science work together to engage students in explaining phenomena.
Live chat discussion:
2:25 p.m. ET
1:25 p.m. CT
12:25 p.m. MT
11:25 a.m. PT
   
Intermission:
2:40 p.m. ET
1:40 p.m. CT
12:40 p.m. MT
11:40 a.m. PT
   
Breakout C (repeat of A, choose one)
3:15 p.m. ET
2:15 p.m. CT
1:15 p.m. MT
12:15 p.m. PT
Modeling
Cynthia Passmore,
University of California, Davis School of Education
Resource Collection
Cynthia Passmore illustrated how engaging students in the practice of modeling can be the centerpiece of instruction and lead them to deeper understanding of a disciplinary core idea.
  Explanation and Argumentation
Jonathan Osborne,
Stanford University
Resource Collection
Jonathan Osborne explained why argument is a central practice of science and provided examples of how student discourse promotes effective science instruction and how explanation and argumentation are essential features of that discourse.
  Engineering
Mariel Milano, Orange County Public Schools
Resource Collection
Mariel Milano focused on engineering practices, explaining how they are similar to yet different from science practices and how students can engage in them to lean core ideas in life, Earth, and physical science.
Live chat discussion:
4:30 p.m. ET
3:30 p.m. CT
2:30 p.m. MT
1:30 p.m. PT
   
Transition time:
4:45 p.m. ET
3:45 p.m. CT
2:45 p.m. MT
1:45 p.m. PT
   
Closing general session 5:00 p.m. ET
4:00 p.m. CT
3:00 p.m. MT
2:00 p.m. PT
Panel Presentation
Mary Colson, Horizon Middle School
Brian Reiser, Northwestern University
Jacqueline R. Smalls, Center for Inspired Teaching
Juliana Texley, National Science Teachers Association
Okhee Lee, New York University
Resource Collection
The panelists addressed key themes, discussed considerations for the classroom, and responded to questions from the audience.



For more information contact webseminars@nsta.org

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