External Resource: Rock Cycle Animation

External Resource

This cutaway view of Earth shows where some common rock-forming processes occur. Embedded animations will illustrate the path of a rock moving through the rock cycle. Topics include: rock cycle, magma chamber, magma, igneous rock, sedimentary rock, erosion, sediments, depostition, compaction, cementation, metamorphism,and metamorphic rocks.

Grades
  • Middle
  • High

Community ActivitySaved in 27 Libraries

Reviews (6)
  • on Sun Jan 21, 2018 1:28 PM

This resource is wonderful, especially for middle school students who very much appreciate the chance to use technology in the classroom. This resource is very hands on and allows the student to walk through the rock cycle in numerous different ways. It also allows for hands-on animation in which the students interact with the rocks in the cycle.

Abigail Leggate
Abigail Leggate

  • on Sun Jan 21, 2018 1:26 PM

This resource is wonderful, especially for middle school students who really appreciate the implementation of technology in the classroom. This resource allows the student to walk through the rock cycle in numerous different ways, while viewing animations of each step in the cycle!

Abigail Leggate
Abigail Leggate

  • on Wed Jan 30, 2013 5:38 PM

I really like how this rock cycle animation includes aspects of plate tectonics. While there are limits to every model, this model does a great job of demonstrating how the process occurs, while offering additional more detailed information of each process and stage. However, care should be used that students do not view the rock cycle as linear...lava, igneous rock, sedimentary rock, metamorphic rock, magma and back to lave. Students need to recognize that an igneous rock can become metamorphic and metamorphic can become sedimentary etc... I will use this animation with a "Highlight, Comment, and Caption" strategy.

Susanne Hokkanen  (Orland Park, IL)
Susanne Hokkanen (Orland Park, IL)

  • on Tue Dec 20, 2011 4:22 PM

From viewing the crystallization of magma to form igneous rock, to the process of the erosion of solid rock to produce sediment and the animation of metamorphism, this resource is great!! Scholars will enjoy their journey through the rock cycle, but more importantly, they will develop the enduring understandings needed to transfer their knowledge of the science learned in the classroom to the real world.

Lorrie Armfield  (Laurel, MD)
Lorrie Armfield (Laurel, MD)

  • on Tue May 10, 2011 10:51 AM

14) This type of interactive is more meaningful to learners since they learn on their own. There is a cutaway view of Earth that shows where some common rock-forming processes occur. Embedded animations illustrate the path of a rock moving through the rock cycle. You click the image to start the animation. Each time the main animation stops, if you click the blinking feature you can see a visualization. This type of interactive will hold a students’ attention for a period of time.

Adah  (San Antonio, TX)
Adah (San Antonio, TX)

  • on Wed Feb 23, 2011 6:06 PM

I like using this kind of interacting media for younger students who wants to go beyond just seeing and listening. The tactile elecment of this learning media is very effecgtive in making a student focus on his particular interest in the whole learning tool. He has control of where to begin, which to focus on, and end up satisfying his multifaceted and multisensorial curiosity.

Ronaldo Relador
Ronaldo Relador


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