Methods and Strategies: Strategy Makeover—K-W-L to T-H-Cby: David T. Crowther and John Cannon

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The K-W-L strategy works well as a preassessment tool because it reveals what students know and want to learn about a topic before instruction and as a postassessment tool because it fosters reflection. Minor modifications to the strategy can incorporate elements essential to science inquiry: questioning, methodology, and evaluation. This new framework is called T-H-C, for the questions, What do you Think? How can we find out? and What do we Conclude?

Grades
  • Elementary
  • Middle
Publication Date
9/1/2004

Community ActivitySaved in 524 Libraries

Reviews (12)
  • on Fri Oct 20, 2017 11:40 AM

As a science educator, I appreciate this transition in the schools from "know, want, learned" to "think, how, conclude." This better encourages students to take chances and make mistakes in the learning process. By asking students what they think instead of what they know, it gives them a comfort of it is okay to be wrong some times, and leads better into the transition of How they can find out. It sparks their curiosity to find out if the answers that they think are correct. This encourages continuous learning , and is beneficial for assessment because students are more aware of their learning process and make conclusions to their inquiries.

Bre Temaat
Bre Temaat

  • on Thu Dec 08, 2016 6:10 PM

This was a very interesting article. I learned that KWL isn't the only way to assess as you teach. I plan on using THC and KWL in my future classroom.

Taci Sims
Taci Sims

  • on Fri Nov 18, 2016 1:53 PM

I really enjoyed this article. I am familiar with the KWL and have used that several times, but I have never heard of the THC chart. I love how the THC chart expands on the KWL chart. I think that it is a great way to really get students to think scientifically. After reading the article, I can fully see how when using the THC chart, it allows for the teacher to be able to integrate cross-curricular activities into the classroom.

Katherine White
Katherine White

  • on Fri Nov 18, 2016 1:53 PM

I feel that I gained a lot from this article. I love the idea of allowing students to contemplate a topic before they delve into the assignment. This will help them focus in on the ideas that they are not familiar with and build off of the knowledge that they already have on the subject. When students are given the T-H-C chart it allows them to be inquiry based learners.

Acathea Peterson  (Jenks, OK)
Acathea Peterson (Jenks, OK)

  • on Fri Nov 18, 2016 1:49 PM

This article has the potential to revolutionize the way many teachers do assessments. It provides teachers with an innovative way to improve upon the standard “KWL” chart. After reading this article I found that this tool could be implemented within a science classroom or lesson successfully. I enjoyed how the article showed the KWL chart to be a great pre-assessment tool that can reveal what students already know as well as what they want to know

Stella Carr
Stella Carr

  • on Wed Oct 26, 2016 8:09 PM

This article talks about how science classrooms can organize their thoughts on a THC chart. Everyone knows about the KWL charts as a reading comprehension strategy. This article introduces the THC strategy. It takes the K(now) of the KWL chart to a T for think. It takes the W(onder) to a H for how. Finally, it converts the L(earn) to a C for conclude. The THC chart is unique and individual for science learning as it it can be used for any inquiry learning classroom. It takes away the fear of kids having the starting point of doubting what they know about a concept, and changes it to what they desire to learn. Instead of writing what they learn immediately they first have to think critically on how they can fired an answer to their question. Lastly, it helps them collect their evidence and report their findings. Through this, teachers can assess students by looking at what they have concluded from looking at the chart. This is an awesome strategy and I highly would encourage teachers to implement this strategy in the science classrooms.

Mariana
Mariana

  • on Tue Oct 25, 2016 10:44 PM

This article is about switching from a KWL chart which is what students know, want to know, and have learned about a specific topic - to a THC chart which is what students think, how they can find out, and what they conclude about a specific topic. I think this chart would be much more useful in a inquiry based science classroom. It gives students more opportunity to explore their thinking in the H column, and also makes it more clear in the T column that they do not necessarily have to have the right answer for what they know but rather now look at it for what they think. This chart also allows for more inquiry based topics and is more appropriate for a science classroom.

Hailey
Hailey

  • on Thu Aug 18, 2011 11:07 AM

The traditional KWL chart is challenged and a new chart T.H.C. is introduced. T is for Think, H is for How and C is for conclusions. When this new chart was tested in a first grade class students’ wrote more for the Think than when the chart was the K for Knowing. As the authors point out it was less confrontational. This new twist is linked to research and the authors talk about other twists on the KWL chart. This is an interesting idea for younger students.

Adah  (San Antonio, TX)
Adah (San Antonio, TX)

  • on Mon Dec 04, 2017 6:01 PM

I like K-W-L strategy and T-H-C strategy. Both of them connect their prior knowledge to the new information and are applied into a wide rang of subjects. From your article review, I was informed of T-H-C strategy which makes modifications based on K-W-L strategy. By this strategy, students will consider three questions:“What do you think?,“How can we find out? and“What do we conclude?”The two strategies are perfect for literature reading and science learning.

Jingjing Heng
Jingjing Heng

  • on Fri Oct 20, 2017 12:26 PM

This article takes a familiar, long standing strategy and twists it into an inquiry based strategy best for science learning. The article (and most of the reviews) refers to just shifting the KWL strategy into the THC strategy, but I believe that the THC strategy would work best if you also incorporated the KWL into usage with the THC strategy. I appreciate the changing of the term know into think, which I agree relieves students fear of being wrong. But when you ask student to tell/write what they think, encourage them to draw on previous knowledge they have on the topic, therefore using what they know to help form what they think will occur. Students should also include ideas of what they want to learn about a topic while forming their thoughts. (Example: if a student wants to know if the classroom leopard gecko will eat dead crickets their think could be “I think leopard geckos will eat both live and dead crickets.”) Finally, to make a proper conclusion you must incorporate what you learned from the experiment or activity. Using both strategies in tandem will help students understand the goals while also encouraging inquiry without the fear of wrong answers.

Hollie Whalen
Hollie Whalen

  • on Tue Dec 27, 2011 8:19 PM

From the Know-Want to know- Learn, we have a transformed graphic organizer T-H-C (Think- How-Conclusions). Like the authors, I believe this chart to be less threatening or confrontational; and great for primary grade levels. It would have been nice to see research conducted using this chart in the secondary classroom; in the middle school setting; I would definitely want my scholars to be challenged more (perhaps with a combination of the traditional and the modern charts). Overall, it was a nice read, and definitely made me ponder how I could create my own chart (putting a new spin on the THC chart), in hopes of activating scholars’ prior knowledge, while challenging them to work in their zones of proximal development.

Lorrie Armfield  (Laurel, MD)
Lorrie Armfield (Laurel, MD)

  • on Tue Dec 27, 2011 7:14 PM

This article details how the kwl chart can be modified for the science classroom. This article just gave a first grade example of how this strategy works. I would have liked to read about more than one example.

Jennifer Primrose
Jennifer Primrose


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