Attracting Student Wonderingsby: Judith Kur and Marcia Heitzmann

Journal ArticleDigital resources are stored online in your NSTA Library.

As the authors approached a unit on magnets with their first-grade students, they decided to incorporate more inquiry into their district’s learning module, Magnets: Elementary Science and Technology Module for Primary Grades (State College Area School District 1993). By restructuring their lessons, using science talks, and listening carefully to their students, they were able to transform students’ surprises and wonderings into testable questions and meet district learning objectives. As a result, the unit had a magnetic effect on students, allowing them to use scientific inquiry to think and act like real scientists.

Grades
  • Elementary
Publication Date
1/1/2008

Community ActivitySaved in 269 Libraries

Reviews (2)
  • on Wed Sep 04, 2013 9:56 AM

The authors of this article stated the following..."By restructuring our lessons, using science talks, and listening carefully to our students, we were able to transform students’ surprises and wonderings into testable questions ...." This statement is very important to teaching younger students. They need time to explore or wonder about a science concept. Then following this up with questions gives the teacher an idea on where to go next and also to discover what the student has learned.

Betty Paulsell  (Kansas City, MO)
Betty Paulsell (Kansas City, MO)

  • on Thu Apr 14, 2011 3:20 PM

Two first grade teachers wrote this article on how to increase student engagement, and the activities can be modified for use at any elementary grade level. Teachers at this elementary school wanted to incorporate more inquiry into their district’s learning module on magnets and have students behave like scientists as they explored their wonderings about magnetism. The teachers discovered that by having their students engage in science talks and by listening to them as they explored, they empowered their students to become scientists. This is an intriguing article and is an example of how powerful the inquiry model can be in order to increase student learning and thinking.

Carolyn Mohr  (Buffalo Grove, IL)
Carolyn Mohr (Buffalo Grove, IL)


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