Guest Editorial: The BSCS 5E Instructional Model: Personal Reflections and Contemporary Implicationsby: Rodger Bybee

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A widely used instructional model, the BSCS 5Es, has helped teachers approach instruction in a meaningful way that enhances student learning. The author, lead developer of the 5Es, provides an overview of the model and answers commonly asked questions on how it’s best used and how it has relevance for lessons connected to the Next Generation Science Standards.

Grades
  • Elementary
Publication Date
4/1/2014

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Reviews (23)
  • on Fri Sep 22, 2017 7:13 PM

I have used the 5E model for my Integration Arts class This is a pretty simple and easy model to follow with the 5 E phases. This article is also great at explaining how each phase works with details on how to twerk the lesson to your specific needs.

Jessica Philipp  (Waterloo, IA)
Jessica Philipp (Waterloo, IA)

  • on Mon Jun 26, 2017 11:50 PM

This article is very informative. I have used the 5E model in the past to write lesson plans but somehow it disappeared off my radar after 18 years of teaching.This article has re-energized me to dust off my 5E mindset and begin using it again. I'm not sure that I ever fully understood how to use the 5E model until I read this article. I would recommend this article to new teachers and to more seasoned professionals who need to jump-start their lesson plan mindset.

Teresa Hall  (TX)
Teresa Hall (TX)

  • on Mon Jun 26, 2017 11:49 PM

Since I started my teaching career in 1997....I've seen MANY interpretations and models of lesson plans, but never have I seen the 5E's! Now this MAKES SENSE! Thank you so much for putting our thoughts and teaching strategies into an applicable and understandable model. Kudos EXXONMOBIL, NSTA, & Math Solutions! Finally, teachers have a tool that's user friendly and meaningful.

Brandy T  (Meraux, LA)
Brandy T (Meraux, LA)

  • on Tue Jul 19, 2016 3:12 AM

It is interesting to realize that the 5E model of 'engage, explore, explain, evaluate & elaborate', adapted by BSCS, was originally described by J. Myron Atkin and Robert Karplus, and has been in existence even before 1962. I had initially thought it was a relatively new concept. I like, in the article, the way BSCS restates that the origin of the 5E model's focus was first start as research based . I tend to wonder how, why and when our education system, skipped the first two 'e's and jump to starting with explanation most times. Knowing the why and how' will help avoid a recurrence over time , I presume.

Aisha Ashiru  (Mandeville, LA)
Aisha Ashiru (Mandeville, LA)

  • on Mon Jun 13, 2016 10:34 PM

The Egg Drop lesson was a great example of the 5E model. The engage activity with the penny really helped develop a system for the egg. Also going through the other steps in the helped clarify the content. This article

Yolander  (Beaumont, TX)
Yolander (Beaumont, TX)

  • on Mon Jun 13, 2016 10:14 PM

The exploration step is key when building confidence in students. Once they have that, they are ready to engage. This article affirms how effective the 5E Plan is,when it is implemented with fidelity.

Barbara Stinnett  (Addison, TX)
Barbara Stinnett (Addison, TX)

  • on Mon Jun 13, 2016 7:35 PM

The 5E model is a great way to promote facilitation of learning versus lecture and test methods previously used in past teaching styles. This encourages student commitment to learning and makes them confident in discussing and brainstorming content. Allowing the students to build knowledge through trial and error helps them work through their own misconceptions. The process causes them to make real-life connections that will extend pass the classroom activities.

Aisha Jones  (Houston, TX)
Aisha Jones (Houston, TX)

  • on Tue Jul 28, 2015 12:02 AM

The 5E model is the basis for best practices science although I find i need to be prepared to repeat the explore and explain segments to small groups or individuals due to those students not fully participating or just following along with their team members and not being able to show mastery individually while the rest go on to elaboration phase.

Jennifer Sutton  (Barry, TX)
Jennifer Sutton (Barry, TX)

  • on Mon Jul 27, 2015 10:24 PM

I found the article to be a great source of review for previous concepts discussed. It is important to start your lesson with a question instead of front loading all of the key information. By using inquiry students retain the information better and can explore the concepts showing greater understanding. Hence in this positive environment future scientists flourish and excel.

Dawn Johnson  (Darlington, MD)
Dawn Johnson (Darlington, MD)

  • on Mon Jul 27, 2015 9:52 PM

The article was concise and informative. 5E task engages students in simple activities. It helps teachers evaluate student knowledge and teachers can clear up any misinformation.

Theresa  (Mobile, AL)
Theresa (Mobile, AL)

  • on Tue Jul 14, 2015 7:06 PM

A great standard for planning out your science lessons.

Elizabeth  (Austin, TX)
Elizabeth (Austin, TX)

  • on Tue Jul 14, 2015 4:54 PM

This article explains the 5_e model in a concise manner. It hits the questions most teachers have and clarifies misconceptions about the model.

Frieda Lamprecht  (Austin, TX)
Frieda Lamprecht (Austin, TX)

  • on Mon Jun 15, 2015 10:46 PM

The 5 E task helps students become engaged in a new concept through the use of short activities that promote curiosity. It provides experiences to students with a common base of activities within which current concepts, processes, and skills are identified. Also, it presents teachers with the opportunity to informally determine misconceptions expressed by the students.

Porfirio Alvarez  (Mesquite, TX)
Porfirio Alvarez (Mesquite, TX)

  • on Mon Jun 15, 2015 10:46 PM

The 5 E task helps students become engaged in a new concept through the use of short activities that promote curiosity. It provides experiences to students with a common base of activities within which current concepts, processes, and skills are identified. Also, it presents teachers with the opportunity to informally determine misconceptions expressed by the students.

Porfirio Alvarez  (Mesquite, TX)
Porfirio Alvarez (Mesquite, TX)

  • on Mon Jun 15, 2015 10:46 PM

The 5 E task helps students become engaged in a new concept through the use of short activities that promote curiosity. It provides experiences to students with a common base of activities within which current concepts, processes, and skills are identified. Also, it presents teachers with the opportunity to informally determine misconceptions expressed by the students.

Porfirio Alvarez  (Mesquite, TX)
Porfirio Alvarez (Mesquite, TX)

  • on Mon Jun 15, 2015 6:41 PM

The Five E's approach is a great way to engage students in active learning. Using this approach, students won't even realize when the lesson begins. Students will feel that they are engaged in an activity, but not realize that they are actively learning through inquiry. I also feel that this approach will get the students interested in discussing their ideas and questions with each other, getting all students actively engaged and excited about learning.

Samuel Adams  (Ardmore, OK)
Samuel Adams (Ardmore, OK)

  • on Mon Jun 15, 2015 5:52 PM

Engage-grab the student's attention and get them interested in the topic. Explore-give students the opportunity to come up with their own explanations and try new things. Explain-using student work, discuss the key concept of the unit you are working on. Use multiple formats for explaining. Elaborate-challenging activities that help them with new situations. Evaluate-give students quality feedback on their work. The article recommends that all of the pieces of phases be used to increase the effectiveness of the model. This should take multiple lessons and be used in the sequence recommended by the team that created it. Interesting article with a good place to start back in my own classroom.

Rebecca Baxter
Rebecca Baxter

  • on Mon Apr 28, 2014 8:43 PM

I have been using the 5 E learning cycle in science for a long time and I have to say I am happy to be able to use it as I begin to help teachers transition to NGSS. Reading this article helped me pause and really reflect on this instructional model , what do each of the Es really mean? How should i be using them as I plan instruction or as I help teachers plan instruction. Writing this review caused me to read this article for the 3rd time after I discussed it with colleagues. It is such a good article by such a wise man that I sent out email recommendations about the article to some more colleagues. Definitely worth your time.

Kathy Renfrew  (Barnet, VT)
Kathy Renfrew (Barnet, VT)

  • on Tue Oct 03, 2017 2:34 PM

The BSCS 5Es is a widely used instructional model, which has helped teachers approach instruction in a meaningful way that enhance student learning. In this article, the author provides an overview of the 5E model and answers some questions to improve the application of the model. According to this article, the BSCS 5Es instructional model has 5 phases, engagement, exploration, explanation, elaboration and evaluation. In the first phase, the educators catch students’ attention and help them engage in a new concept by short activities. In the second phase, teachers provide students time and opportunity to pursue their questions, observe patterns, investigate and analyze phenomena.In the third phase, teachers allow students to analyze their exploration and explain their understanding. In the fourth phase, teachers expand students’ thinking, which stimulate students to develop a deeper and broader understanding. In the last phase, teachers give students feedback to help students correct or enhance their work. The author also give some recommendations for teachers to promote their application. The author suggests that the best choice of duration to teach a unit is 2-3 weeks. Using the model of entire program can increase the effectiveness. When teachers using this model, the most effective choice is that teachers had better not omit any phase or shift the sequence of phases. If necessary, teachers can add or repeat some phases to develop a better teaching efficiency. It is also important that the 5Es can help to incorporate the multi-dimensions of NGSS in the classroom. In conclusion, the 5E model provide 5 sequence for teaching and learning. However, it is not just a rigid model. As a teacher, we should apply this model flexibly.

Iris
Iris

  • on Mon Jul 18, 2016 11:46 PM

Great Article! Although I already follow this method somewhat, the article opened my eyes to how easy it can be to plan such an engaging and fun lesson. Reflecting back on today's Egg Drop lesson, I can see how it was planned and taught using this method. Being able to "see" how the lesson was performed from both a teacher and students' perspective really helped. This is definitely something to take back home to my colleagues.

KINTA ATKINS  (West Point, MS)
KINTA ATKINS (West Point, MS)

  • on Mon Jul 18, 2016 9:54 PM

Not being familiar to the 5E approach the article was very helpful in explaining the concept. My first concern was the amount of time that would be necessary in doing a lesson, but after reading my misconceptions were cleared and the Egg drop experiment was a good example of teaching utilizing the 5E approach.

Douglas  (Toms  RIver, NJ)
Douglas (Toms RIver, NJ)

  • on Mon Jul 27, 2015 11:46 PM

Basic, to the point, and hits what teachers need to know to construct 5 E lesson plans. My HUGE 'aha' was that there are multiple lessons for the points of the 5 E's..... huh. Not intended for a day lesson really, but a unit.

Christi Marquardt  (Cascade, CO)
Christi Marquardt (Cascade, CO)

  • on Mon Jul 11, 2016 11:26 PM

I have to stick with a pacing guide so following and not skipping any phases could be a conflict. This is helpful tool to use when designing an elaborate lesson but I always encounter gaps in learning so adjusting the phases is important. I would think that the elaboration phase might get cut short if a concept is not understood by the students.

Kyle  (Midland, TX)
Kyle (Midland, TX)


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