Cells and Chemical Reactions

SciPackDigital resources are stored online in your NSTA Library.

SciPacks are self-directed online learning experiences for teachers to enhance their understanding of a particular scientific concept and its related pedagogical implications for student learning. Unlimited expert content help via email and a final assessment both facilitate and document teacher learning.

The Cells and Chemical Reactions SciPack explores the chemical reactions that take place in plant and animal cells. The SciPack takes a close look at the process of photosynthesis in plant cells and cellular respiration in plant and animal cells. Additionally, this SciPack looks at how the rates of these reactions can be affected by temperature, pH, hydration levels, and enzymes.

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Reviews (14)
  • on Sat Feb 04, 2017 9:46 PM

I know that throughout my education I have learned about Cells and Chemical Reactions but I can tell you after so many years there was much I did not know. I chose this SciPack in hopes of refreshing my memory. It did not let me down. I was not only reminded of what I had forgotten but learned so much more valuable information. I really enjoyed the videos and interactive layout of the SciPack and now have a better understanding of the concept due to it!

Amanda Acker
Amanda Acker

  • on Wed Feb 11, 2015 11:55 PM

I remember having to learn photosynthesis and cellular respiration, but I don't remember understanding as much as I do now. I'm not an expert by any means, but this SciPack helped me wrap my mind around these hard topics.

Jessica Minton  (Collierville, TN)
Jessica Minton (Collierville, TN)

  • on Tue Aug 19, 2014 8:14 PM

The structure of the SciPacks really help me understand the underlying concepts that surround each topic. Initially, I was unsure how well I'd grasp scientific concepts in a self-paced, online format, but the carefully sequenced topics, interactive activities and simulations, in addition to the explanations work well together to help deepen understanding. Especially valuable are the pedagogical implications and common student misconceptions. I feel a lot more confident in the areas after using a SciPack, and I highly recommend SciPacks to anyone needing to learn more about scientific topics!

Naomi Beverly  (Marietta, GA)
Naomi Beverly (Marietta, GA)

  • on Tue Aug 20, 2013 11:05 PM

I used this resource extensively during my review just prior to the PA Keystone Tests with great results! Thank you!

James Johnson  (Custer City, PA)
James Johnson (Custer City, PA)

  • on Sun Nov 04, 2012 5:11 PM

The cells and chemical reactions was a very enjoyable resource. Biochemistry is my favorite field and while I knew most of this information, going over it in a systematic way helped to solidify the topics in my mind.

Rebecca F  (Elizabeth, WV)
Rebecca F (Elizabeth, WV)

  • on Thu Nov 01, 2012 8:56 PM

I was challenged by this Scipack. I struggled with the chemical processes and reactions but the material was presented very effectively and at a challenging level for my use. I worked hard on this but I also learned a lot.

James Johnson  (Custer City, PA)
James Johnson (Custer City, PA)

  • on Tue Mar 13, 2012 6:40 PM

At first I thought this SciPack was going to be largely redundant with other SciPacks that discuss cell growth and functions, and at one level it is, because there is nothing fundamental in it that isn't addressed somewhere else. That said, this SciPack goes into much more chemical detail as to the "how's" of energy generation and consumption, giving specific details as to the chemicals and mechanisms involved, as well as the energy balance sheet (what you put into the system and what you get out). This SciPack is the place where biology meets chemistry, so if you are ever interested in knowing the mechanisms of cellular function (instead of just glossing over it and saying "that's just how it is"), this is the SciPack that will take you there. Alternatively, as a chemist, it's your chance to see chemistry played out on its most exciting stage: life.

Eric Carlson  (Royal City, WA)
Eric Carlson (Royal City, WA)

  • on Wed Oct 26, 2016 10:57 AM

This scipack included a ton of useful information. It was a great review for me because I had forgotten a lot of what I had learned about cells in school. However, I do think some of the information varies from what is being taught in the schools. Overall, I learned a lot and it was very interesting.

Hannah Allen
Hannah Allen

  • on Sun Oct 23, 2016 9:22 PM

I thought that the SciPack had a great deal of useful information. The questions that were embedded in the text helped me to better understand some of the ideas. Having said all of that, the SciPack did contain some information that conflicted with what is being taught in some classrooms today. Overall, the SciPack was helpful and useful.

Trenton Lowe
Trenton Lowe

  • on Wed Mar 06, 2013 9:14 PM

While I appreciate the depth of this SciPack I did feel that it delved deeper into the topic than is necessary even for HS students.

Andrea Gouldy  (Granbury, TX)
Andrea Gouldy (Granbury, TX)

  • on Thu Jun 18, 2015 12:20 PM

This provide sufficient back ground knowledge, but not entirely aligned to our curriculum & TEKS. Could be very beneficial for another state.

Kevin Wrobleski  (Crosby, TX)
Kevin Wrobleski (Crosby, TX)

  • on Thu Jun 18, 2015 12:20 PM

This provide sufficient back ground knowledge, but not entirely aligned to our curriculum & TEKS. Could be very beneficial for another state.

Kevin Wrobleski  (Crosby, TX)
Kevin Wrobleski (Crosby, TX)

  • on Thu Jun 18, 2015 12:20 PM

This provide sufficient back ground knowledge, but not entirely aligned to our curriculum & TEKS. Could be very beneficial for another state.

Kevin Wrobleski  (Crosby, TX)
Kevin Wrobleski (Crosby, TX)

  • on Tue Dec 04, 2012 2:29 PM

I still do not understand why some scientists say that plants do not move! When infact plants do move in response to an observed stimulus like sun, water or gravity - what we term as irritable movements like tropism, nastism and taxis. Yet plants also move even when there is no observed/ apparent stimulus -and that is called Spontaneous movement. Growth movements in plants are called tropisms - geotropism, phototropism,and so on. This Science Object has a question that states that plants do not move; hence they do not need energy for movement since they do not move!!!!????

Olukayode Banmeke  (Riverdale, MD)
Olukayode Banmeke (Riverdale, MD)


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