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Pushes and Pulls Book Chapter
Book Chapter
Pushes and Pulls
Grade Level: Elementary School
Students have early childhood experiences with basic force concepts well before they encounter the word force in the science classroom. For example, it doesn’t take long for a child to figure out that pushing or pulling on a toy will cause it to move in the direction of the push or pull. From a very early age, children push and pull on the objects they play with. The way the word force is used in everyday language affects students’ understanding of...  [view full summary]
Students have early childhood experiences with basic force concepts well before they encounter the word force in the science classroom. For example, it doesn’t take long for a child to figure out that pushing or pulling on a toy will cause it to move in the direction of the push or pull. From a very early age, children push and pull on the objects they play with. The way the word force is used in everyday language affects students’ understanding of force in a science context. When the concept of force is first taught in the elementary curriculum, it is usually introduced as a push or a pull.

This article was specifically written to illustrate how a formative assessment probe, often combined with a FACT, is used in a K–6 classroom. It provides extensive descriptions of how the probe is used, actual examples of student work or transcripts of students talking about their ideas, or illustrative examples of instructional decisions made by elementary teachers. It provides this information specifically for elementary teachers, giving deeper insight into the formative assessment process and complementing the teacher notes.

In addition, a link is provided at the end of the chapter to a website where teachers can download a copy of the probe to use with their students. The chapter also includes a Reflection and Study Guide. These guides include a set of questions designed to help the reader reflect on what they learned after reading the chapter. Even if your state has not adopted the NGSS, the links provided will help you clarify the content in your own standards and provide a lens to focus on what effective teaching and learning in science involves when using the formative assessment probes.

This free sample chapter also includes Table of Contents, Foreword, Introduction, and Index.
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An “HOLA” Approach to Learning Science Book Chapter
Book Chapter
An “HOLA” Approach to Learning Science
By: Theodora Pinou, Marjorie Drucker, and Elizabeth Studley
Edited by: Robert E. Yager
Grade Level: College, Elementary School, High School, Middle School
Implementing classroom instructional strategies that lend themselves to both unidimensional assessments and alternative assessments provide evidence of proficiency that can satisfy both school and student learning evaluations. Barnard Environmental Magnet School’s collaboration with Solar Youth offers one such learning and assessment opportunity. Solar Youth’s Hands-On Outdoor Learning Adventure (HOLA) method of instruction uses hands-on inquiry strategies...  [view full summary]
Implementing classroom instructional strategies that lend themselves to both unidimensional assessments and alternative assessments provide evidence of proficiency that can satisfy both school and student learning evaluations. Barnard Environmental Magnet School’s collaboration with Solar Youth offers one such learning and assessment opportunity. Solar Youth’s Hands-On Outdoor Learning Adventure (HOLA) method of instruction uses hands-on inquiry strategies in combination with kinesthetic-based cognitive questioning and is the basis for this chapter. The HOLA approach is an example of how kinesthetic assessment can help improve student experiences with multiple-choice test-taking skills while also engaging students with socially important scientific issues. This learning strategy retains student engagement inasmuch as the student is actively presenting and thinking about what is being discussed.
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Tahoma Outdoor
Academy: Learning About Science and the Environment Inside and Outside the Classroom Book Chapter
Book Chapter
Tahoma Outdoor Academy: Learning About Science and the Environment Inside and Outside the Classroom
By: Oksana Bartosh, Amy E. Ryken, Margaret Tudor, and Jolie Mayer-Smith
Edited by: Robert E. Yager
Grade Level: College, Elementary School, High School, Middle School
Taking students outside of the classroom is recognized as a valid and important pedagogical practice; however, teachers at all levels feel challenged when faced with integrating informal, outdoor, and community settings with subject-specific curricula and mandated learning outcomes (Falk and Balling 2001; Michie 1998; Price and Hein 1991; Simmons 1998; Smith and Williams 1999). There is a need for models of integration that also address engaging students...  [view full summary]
Taking students outside of the classroom is recognized as a valid and important pedagogical practice; however, teachers at all levels feel challenged when faced with integrating informal, outdoor, and community settings with subject-specific curricula and mandated learning outcomes (Falk and Balling 2001; Michie 1998; Price and Hein 1991; Simmons 1998; Smith and Williams 1999). There is a need for models of integration that also address engaging students in field investigations and civic participation. In this chapter, the authors describe a high school program that uses the environment as an integrating context for science, language arts, health and fitness, and service-learning. They explore how the program influences students’ understanding of science, environmental concepts, and inquiry skills,and inquiry skills.
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Linking Science, Technology, and Society by Examining the Impact of Nanotechnology on a Local Community Book Chapter
Book Chapter
Linking Science, Technology, and Society by Examining the Impact of Nanotechnology on a Local Community
By: Joseph Muskin, Janet Wattnem, and Barbara Hug
Edited by: Robert E. Yager
Grade Level: College, Elementary School, High School, Middle School
Goal 3 of the National Science Education Standards (NSES) calls for students to “engage intelligently in public discourse and debate about matters of scientific and technological concern” (NRC 1996, p. 13). The unit described in this chapter, “Clean—At What Cost?” focuses on addressing this goal through a series of activities that allow students to develop an understanding about the use of nanotechnology that has potentially direct effects on their...  [view full summary]
Goal 3 of the National Science Education Standards (NSES) calls for students to “engage intelligently in public discourse and debate about matters of scientific and technological concern” (NRC 1996, p. 13). The unit described in this chapter, “Clean—At What Cost?” focuses on addressing this goal through a series of activities that allow students to develop an understanding about the use of nanotechnology that has potentially direct effects on their lives. The unit was developed for middle and high school students for integration into the science curriculum at a variety of possible locations (such as in lessons on microbiology, properties of matter, or impact of science and technology). This free selection includes the Table of Contents, Foreword, and Index.
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Applications of Biology as Part of a Preservice Program for Science
Teachers Book Chapter
Book Chapter
Applications of Biology as Part of a Preservice Program for Science Teachers
By: Hakan Akcay
Edited by: Robert E. Yager
Grade Level: College, Elementary School, High School, Middle School
The Applications of Biology course provides students with the opportunity to apply scientific information in making decisions about real-world issues. Within the context of the course, students are introduced to an applications approach, with as many class examples as students. With such examples, students discuss instructional strategies needed to implement such a new instructional approach effectively in the teaching and learning of science. The...  [view full summary]
The Applications of Biology course provides students with the opportunity to apply scientific information in making decisions about real-world issues. Within the context of the course, students are introduced to an applications approach, with as many class examples as students. With such examples, students discuss instructional strategies needed to implement such a new instructional approach effectively in the teaching and learning of science. The applications course promotes scientific literacy and helps students to see science teaching and learning in a new way—one that encompasses all aspects of learning. When science is addressed in this way, preservice science teachers become facilitators who assist students in investigating possible answers to their own questions. Science becomes not just a subject that is taught, but is seen as an all important subject that can be incorporated into every aspect of the curriculum.
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“Who Ate Our Corn?” We Want to Know and So Should You! Book Chapter
Book Chapter
“Who Ate Our Corn?” We Want to Know and So Should You!
By: Craig Wilson, Timothy P. Scott, and Juan D. López, Jr.
Edited by: Robert E. Yager
Grade Level: College, Elementary School, High School, Middle School
“Who ate our corn?” sounds like a simple enough question but is designed to intrigue students and launch them on a quest to find answers and to ask more questions. That is the goal of the Future Scientists Program featured in this chapter. The Future Scientists Program is built around a question, but with the larger goal of reawakening the scientist in all of us. Society will be better served by a scientifically literate population, not only able...  [view full summary]
“Who ate our corn?” sounds like a simple enough question but is designed to intrigue students and launch them on a quest to find answers and to ask more questions. That is the goal of the Future Scientists Program featured in this chapter. The Future Scientists Program is built around a question, but with the larger goal of reawakening the scientist in all of us. Society will be better served by a scientifically literate population, not only able to explore science, but to be in a position to question it. It establishes a collaborative community of teachers, students, parents, and research scientists.
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Students as Scientists: Guidelines for Teaching Science Through Disciplinary Inquiry Book Chapter
Book Chapter
Students as Scientists: Guidelines for Teaching Science Through Disciplinary Inquiry
By: Kanesa Duncan Seraphin and Erin Baumgartner
Edited by: Robert E. Yager
Grade Level: College, Elementary School, High School, Middle School
Teaching Science as Inquiry (TSI) provides a foundation for engaging both teachers and students in disciplinary inquiry. This chapter describes a framework of teaching and learning developed to help overcome the difficulty in teaching the disciplinary inquiry of science. The framework comes from the Teaching Science as Inquiry (TSI) program developed at the University of Hawaii’s Curriculum Research and Development Group (CRDG).
Teaching Science as Inquiry (TSI) provides a foundation for engaging both teachers and students in disciplinary inquiry. This chapter describes a framework of teaching and learning developed to help overcome the difficulty in teaching the disciplinary inquiry of science. The framework comes from the Teaching Science as Inquiry (TSI) program developed at the University of Hawaii’s Curriculum Research and Development Group (CRDG).
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Project-Based After-School Science in New York City Book Chapter
Book Chapter
Project-Based After-School Science in New York City
By: Kabba E. Colley and Wesley B. Pitts
Edited by: Robert E. Yager
Grade Level: College, Elementary School, High School, Middle School
In this chapter, the authors report on how inner city high school students learn science through participation in an after-school science program called Explore! Project-based science instruction (PBSI) was used as the main method of instruction in which students had the opportunity to plan, implement, and present their own scientific investigations of urban ecosystems in Queens, New York City. The authors are convinced that with proper funding and...  [view full summary]
In this chapter, the authors report on how inner city high school students learn science through participation in an after-school science program called Explore! Project-based science instruction (PBSI) was used as the main method of instruction in which students had the opportunity to plan, implement, and present their own scientific investigations of urban ecosystems in Queens, New York City. The authors are convinced that with proper funding and support, project-based after-school science programs such as the one described in this chapter could bridge the science achievement gap, particularly among underrepresented groups.
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Issues-Based Learning
and Inquiry in Environmental Science:
Meeting the Third Goal of the National Science Education Standards Book Chapter
Book Chapter
Issues-Based Learning and Inquiry in Environmental Science: Meeting the Third Goal of the National Science Education Standards
By: Jason Pilot, Doug Jones, Wayne Melville, and Anthony Bartley
Edited by: Robert E. Yager
Grade Level: College, Elementary School, High School, Middle School
As in many other education jurisdictions, environmental education in Ontario is infused throughout the science curriculum. This infusion requires students to not only understand the science behind environmental issues, but also be provided with “meaningful contexts for applying what has been learned about the environment, for thinking critically about issues related to the environment, and for considering personal action that can be taken to protect...  [view full summary]
As in many other education jurisdictions, environmental education in Ontario is infused throughout the science curriculum. This infusion requires students to not only understand the science behind environmental issues, but also be provided with “meaningful contexts for applying what has been learned about the environment, for thinking critically about issues related to the environment, and for considering personal action that can be taken to protect the environment” (Ontario Ministry of Education 2008, p. 38). In this chapter, the authors share the experiences of one secondary school and its community in developing these “meaningful contexts.”
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Communic–Able: Writing to Learn About Emerging Diseases Book Chapter
Book Chapter
Communic–Able: Writing to Learn About Emerging Diseases
By: Andrew J. Petto
Edited by: Robert E. Yager
Grade Level: College, Elementary School, High School, Middle School
High school students in a seven-week writing-intensive project at the University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health serve as research apprentices. This project focuses on students in need of additional development in communication, computation, or scientific background, and creates a research group that carries out original research on a mock epidemic. The project uses a problem-based learning (PBL) approach (Chin and Chia 2008; Massa...  [view full summary]
High school students in a seven-week writing-intensive project at the University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health serve as research apprentices. This project focuses on students in need of additional development in communication, computation, or scientific background, and creates a research group that carries out original research on a mock epidemic. The project uses a problem-based learning (PBL) approach (Chin and Chia 2008; Massa 2008), applying research and writing skills to the problem of the emergence of a mock communicable disease on the University of Wisconsin campus. Students in this project form an epidemiological task force called U-WHO (University of Wisconsin Health Organization) and design their own projects to study the spread of this imaginary disease, based on research approaches that they have explored in the scientific literature.
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Results: 1 - 10 of 2288 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 ... 229 Next