NSTA RSS Feeds 

Search Results

 
Sort by:
Results: 1 - 10 of 2265 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 ... 227 Next
Teachers Supporting Teachers in Learning Book Chapter
Book Chapter
Teachers Supporting Teachers in Learning
By: Diantha Lay
Grade Level: Elementary School, High School, Middle School
Diantha Lay is principal of an elementary school in Montgomery County, Maryland. When she wrote this chapter, she was just starting a new position for the county as a staff development teacher. Earlier she had been a second- and a fourth-grade teacher with a passion for science. When her county decided to establish the new position of staff development teacher in every school, Diantha embarked on a new adventure. In this chapter, she describes the...  [view full summary]
Diantha Lay is principal of an elementary school in Montgomery County, Maryland. When she wrote this chapter, she was just starting a new position for the county as a staff development teacher. Earlier she had been a second- and a fourth-grade teacher with a passion for science. When her county decided to establish the new position of staff development teacher in every school, Diantha embarked on a new adventure. In this chapter, she describes the formation of teacher study groups as she began to engage colleagues in developing a professional learning community in their school.
[hide full abstract]
Member Price: $2.79      Nonmember Price: $3.49
TEAM Connections: Four Teachers’ Journeys Into Action Research Book Chapter
Book Chapter
TEAM Connections: Four Teachers’ Journeys Into Action Research
By: Judy Fix, Dianne Johnson, Norma Fletcher, and Janet Siulc
Grade Level: Elementary School, High School, Middle School
Judy Fix, Norma Fletcher, Dianne Johnson, and Janet Siulc—a group of teachers in the Buffalo Public School District—wondered what they could do that would go beyond talk and speculation about their teaching practices. They wanted to take action in their classrooms. This chapter is about the journey upon which the four teachers embarked as they hoped to find out if what they thought they were doing was really making a difference in their students’...  [view full summary]
Judy Fix, Norma Fletcher, Dianne Johnson, and Janet Siulc—a group of teachers in the Buffalo Public School District—wondered what they could do that would go beyond talk and speculation about their teaching practices. They wanted to take action in their classrooms. This chapter is about the journey upon which the four teachers embarked as they hoped to find out if what they thought they were doing was really making a difference in their students’ learning. It provides only a brief glimpse into the many places that their action-research journey led them.
[hide full abstract]
Member Price: $2.79      Nonmember Price: $3.49
How Can Playing With a Motion Detector Help Children Learn to Write Clear Sequential Directions?  Book Chapter
Book Chapter
How Can Playing With a Motion Detector Help Children Learn to Write Clear Sequential Directions?
By: Kathleen Dillon Hogan
Grade Level: Elementary School
Kathleen Dillon Hogan is a kindergarten teacher in the Calvert County, Maryland, public schools. When this paper was written, she was a first-grade teacher at Hyattsville Elementary School in Hyattsville, Maryland. Kathleen heard a colleague describe how her first-grade students were using motion detectors and computers to learn about line graphs (see Chapter 13). She interested her school’s reading specialist in trying this with her students, and...  [view full summary]
Kathleen Dillon Hogan is a kindergarten teacher in the Calvert County, Maryland, public schools. When this paper was written, she was a first-grade teacher at Hyattsville Elementary School in Hyattsville, Maryland. Kathleen heard a colleague describe how her first-grade students were using motion detectors and computers to learn about line graphs (see Chapter 13). She interested her school’s reading specialist in trying this with her students, and together they invented a new way to teach a language arts objective, writing clear sequential directions by using these devices. She documented her students’ learning by videotaping their actions and comments. She also made copies of their writings and drawings as they designed motions, predicted graphs, and tested their predictions. This free selection includes the Table of Contents, Foreword, Preface, and an About the Editors section.
[hide full abstract]
Member Price: Free      Nonmember Price: Free
Becoming a Teacher Researcher: Giving Space, Finding Space Book Chapter
Book Chapter
Becoming a Teacher Researcher: Giving Space, Finding Space
By: Christopher Horne
Grade Level: Elementary School, High School, Middle School
Christopher Horne is a teacher specialist for elementary science for Frederick County, Maryland, public schools and an adjunct professor in the education department at Mount Saint Mary’s University in Emmitsburg, Maryland. He is pursuing a doctoral degree in elementary science education at the University of Maryland, College Park. As a science specialist, Chris frequently demonstrates inquiry-based instruction in elementary classrooms. Chris describes...  [view full summary]
Christopher Horne is a teacher specialist for elementary science for Frederick County, Maryland, public schools and an adjunct professor in the education department at Mount Saint Mary’s University in Emmitsburg, Maryland. He is pursuing a doctoral degree in elementary science education at the University of Maryland, College Park. As a science specialist, Chris frequently demonstrates inquiry-based instruction in elementary classrooms. Chris describes a process in which he uses students’ written responses during one session as the “text” for reading and discussion during subsequent sessions while he engages fourth-grade students in learning about space science. Then he steps back and reflects upon his experiences in learning to document student thinking.
[hide full abstract]
Member Price: $2.79      Nonmember Price: $3.49
Reading, Writing, Comprehension, and Confidence—Achieved in Science Contexts  Book Chapter
Book Chapter
Reading, Writing, Comprehension, and Confidence—Achieved in Science Contexts
By: Elizabeth Kline
Grade Level: Elementary School, High School, Middle School
When Elizabeth Kline wrote this, she was a fifth-grade teacher in Prince George’s County, Maryland. A desire to integrate scientific concepts in a curriculum dominated by reading, writing, and mathematics motivated her to change the way she taught the mandated unit on the Moon. She invited her students to make a book. She documented their learning, continually assessing students understanding in the process. The excitement in the class was palpable...  [view full summary]
When Elizabeth Kline wrote this, she was a fifth-grade teacher in Prince George’s County, Maryland. A desire to integrate scientific concepts in a curriculum dominated by reading, writing, and mathematics motivated her to change the way she taught the mandated unit on the Moon. She invited her students to make a book. She documented their learning, continually assessing students understanding in the process. The excitement in the class was palpable as students used their creativity while they integrated science and literacy. The next year, when the unit began, her new students often consulted the book and enjoyed reading other fifth graders’ interpretation of the subject matter. In this chapter, Elizabeth describes the process by which she engaged her students in literacy learning in a science context.
[hide full abstract]
Member Price: $2.79      Nonmember Price: $3.49
Fourth-Grade Scientists Investigate Electric Circuits Book Chapter
Book Chapter
Fourth-Grade Scientists Investigate Electric Circuits
By: Trisha Kagey Boswell
Grade Level: Elementary School
Trisha Kagey Boswell is a third-grade teacher at an elementary school in Montgomery County, Maryland, where she has taught for eight years. Her school is an art-integrated magnet school. When she wrote this chapter, she was a first-year teacher, teaching fourth grade. She reflects on trying to create in her own classroom the inquiry experiences she enjoyed in a physics course as part of her preservice program. She also describes her efforts at tracking...  [view full summary]
Trisha Kagey Boswell is a third-grade teacher at an elementary school in Montgomery County, Maryland, where she has taught for eight years. Her school is an art-integrated magnet school. When she wrote this chapter, she was a first-year teacher, teaching fourth grade. She reflects on trying to create in her own classroom the inquiry experiences she enjoyed in a physics course as part of her preservice program. She also describes her efforts at tracking the influence of such inquiry-based instruction by documenting changes in her students’ understandings of what scientists do. Writing in the middle of a unit on electric circuits, she comments upon what they had done so far, describes what they were in the process of doing, and anticipates an event in which the students would be communicating their findings.
[hide full abstract]
Member Price: $2.79      Nonmember Price: $3.49
Learning About Motion: Fun for All Book Chapter
Book Chapter
Learning About Motion: Fun for All
By: Deborah L. Roberts
Grade Level: Elementary School, High School, Middle School
Deborah Roberts is a fifth-grade teacher in Phoenix, Arizona. At the time she wrote this chapter, she was a middle-school science teacher in a high-poverty suburban school in Maryland. An earlier version of this paper was presented at the University of Pennsylvania 21st Annual Ethnography in Education Research Forum in March 2000 and published in The Oregon Science Teacher. Deborah begins her story by reflecting on an undergraduate physics...  [view full summary]
Deborah Roberts is a fifth-grade teacher in Phoenix, Arizona. At the time she wrote this chapter, she was a middle-school science teacher in a high-poverty suburban school in Maryland. An earlier version of this paper was presented at the University of Pennsylvania 21st Annual Ethnography in Education Research Forum in March 2000 and published in The Oregon Science Teacher. Deborah begins her story by reflecting on an undergraduate physics course in which she learned how to ask questions and seek answers while using devices such as motion detectors and computers. Next she relates experiences when, as a beginning teacher, she brought her first-grade students to the physics lab so they could play with these devices. She also describes a seminar at her school during which she enticed several colleagues into learning about motion with these devices. She concludes with reflections upon engaging middle school students and student teachers in motion detector explorations.
[hide full abstract]
Member Price: $2.79      Nonmember Price: $3.49
Reflections on Fostering Teacher Inquiries Into Science Learning and Teaching Book Chapter
Book Chapter
Reflections on Fostering Teacher Inquiries Into Science Learning and Teaching
By: Emily Hanke van Zee
Grade Level: Elementary School, High School, Middle School
Emily van Zee is an associate professor of science education at Oregon State University and co-organizer of Teacher Researcher Day at National Science Teachers Association (NSTA) national conferences. She has been a middle school science teacher, scout leader, physics instructor, and science teacher educator. While a faculty member at the University of Maryland, College Park, she initiated and facilitated the Science Inquiry Group with graduates of...  [view full summary]
Emily van Zee is an associate professor of science education at Oregon State University and co-organizer of Teacher Researcher Day at National Science Teachers Association (NSTA) national conferences. She has been a middle school science teacher, scout leader, physics instructor, and science teacher educator. While a faculty member at the University of Maryland, College Park, she initiated and facilitated the Science Inquiry Group with graduates of her courses and their colleagues. As a university professor, Emily found that collaborating with K-12 teachers prompted major shifts in her roles as a teacher and as a researcher. Both she and the teachers faced challenges in negotiating new perspectives on their relative status, modes of discourse during meetings, time required for collaboration, and ways to communicate the knowledge generated. In this chapter, she reflects upon these challenges and the personal history that underlies her commitment and approaches to fostering teacher research.
[hide full abstract]
Member Price: $2.79      Nonmember Price: $3.49
Session 9 Book Chapter
Book Chapter
Session 9
By: Bernie Zubrowski, Vivian Troen, and Marian Pasquale
Grade Level: Middle School
In this session, participants identify a mentoring situation that has been challenging for them and explore ideas about how to become more effective mentors. They learn about different conflict management styles, identify their own, and consider the potential uses and limitations of each style. They make mini-pond environments to explore ecological and environmental concepts. They create concept maps and brainstorm various contexts that potentially...  [view full summary]
In this session, participants identify a mentoring situation that has been challenging for them and explore ideas about how to become more effective mentors. They learn about different conflict management styles, identify their own, and consider the potential uses and limitations of each style. They make mini-pond environments to explore ecological and environmental concepts. They create concept maps and brainstorm various contexts that potentially would support development of the mini-ponds.
[hide full abstract]
Member Price: $2.79      Nonmember Price: $3.49
Session 3 Book Chapter
Book Chapter
Session 3
By: Bernie Zubrowski, Vivian Troen, and Marian Pasquale
Grade Level: Middle School
In this session, you introduce participants to the second phase of the inquiry protocol—investigation and data collection. They have an opportunity to delve deeply into the specifics of that phase through a virtual classroom observation. In this video segment, a teacher works with her students on the same investigations as those in which participants engage in the science section of this session. In the science section, participants explore cooling...  [view full summary]
In this session, you introduce participants to the second phase of the inquiry protocol—investigation and data collection. They have an opportunity to delve deeply into the specifics of that phase through a virtual classroom observation. In this video segment, a teacher works with her students on the same investigations as those in which participants engage in the science section of this session. In the science section, participants explore cooling hot water with three different solutions: cold water, ice water, and ice-salt water.
[hide full abstract]
Member Price: $2.79      Nonmember Price: $3.49
Results: 1 - 10 of 2265 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 ... 227 Next