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Energy: Thermal Energy, Heat, and Temperature Science Object
Science Object
Energy: Thermal Energy, Heat, and Temperature
Grade Level: Elementary School, High School, Middle School
Science Objects are two hour on-line interactive inquiry-based content modules that help teachers better understand the science content they teach. This Science Object is the third of four Science Objects in the Energy SciPack. It provides a conceptual and real-world understanding of the relationship between thermal energy, heat, and temperature. The thermal energy of a material consists of the disordered motion of its atoms or molecules. Thermal...  [view full summary]
Science Objects are two hour on-line interactive inquiry-based content modules that help teachers better understand the science content they teach. This Science Object is the third of four Science Objects in the Energy SciPack. It provides a conceptual and real-world understanding of the relationship between thermal energy, heat, and temperature. The thermal energy of a material consists of the disordered motion of its atoms or molecules. Thermal energy can be transferred through materials or from one material to another by conduction (the collisions of atoms), or across space by radiation. If the material is fluid, convection currents aid the transfer of thermal energy (convection). When thermal energy is transferred it is called heat. Temperature is a measure of the average kinetic energy of atoms and molecules in a material.
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Interdependence of Life: Population Balance in Biomes Science Object
Science Object
Interdependence of Life: Population Balance in Biomes
Grade Level: Elementary School, High School, Middle School
Science Objects are two hour on-line interactive inquiry-based content modules that help teachers better understand the science content they teach. This Science Object is the third of four Science Objects in the Interdependence of Life SciPack. It explores population balance in biomes.

Interdependent and fluctuating interactions among living organisms and populations and the abiotic components of their environment cause cyclical...  [view full summary]
Science Objects are two hour on-line interactive inquiry-based content modules that help teachers better understand the science content they teach. This Science Object is the third of four Science Objects in the Interdependence of Life SciPack. It explores population balance in biomes.

Interdependent and fluctuating interactions among living organisms and populations and the abiotic components of their environment cause cyclical changes in the overall ecosystem resource equilibrium.

Interactions among living organisms within a population and among organisms of different populations take place on an ever-changing environmental stage. The nonliving environment—including land and water, solar radiation, rainfall, mineral concentrations, temperature and topography—shapes Earth’s ecosystems. Because each species can tolerate a limited range of physical conditions, the diversity of physical conditions creates a wide variety of ecosystems. In all these environments organisms use vital, yet limited, resources; each seeking its share in specific ways that are limited by biotic and abiotic factors.

Learning Outcomes:
  • Explain why there are such diverse ecosystems on Earth.
  • Given a description of changes in abiotic factors defining an ecosystem (i.e. temperature, precipitation, soil composition, atmospheric composition, amount of available solar energy) and the tolerance of a few species to these factors, identify graphs that accurately predict their effects on size and growth rate of these species.
  • Identify and explain graphs that accurately represent examples of dynamic equilibrium.
  • Explain how the population sizes of predators and their prey maintain a balance over many generations.

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Universe: The Origin and Evolution of the Universe Science Object
Science Object
Universe: The Origin and Evolution of the Universe
Grade Level: Elementary School, High School, Middle School
Science Objects are two hour on-line interactive inquiry-based content modules that help teachers better understand the science content they teach. This Science Object, co-developed between NASA and NSTA, is the fifth of five Science Objects in the Universe SciPack. It provides understanding of how the universe formed, how it has changed over time, and how it continues to change today. The ‘big bang’ theory of universe formation is supported by recent...  [view full summary]
Science Objects are two hour on-line interactive inquiry-based content modules that help teachers better understand the science content they teach. This Science Object, co-developed between NASA and NSTA, is the fifth of five Science Objects in the Universe SciPack. It provides understanding of how the universe formed, how it has changed over time, and how it continues to change today. The ‘big bang’ theory of universe formation is supported by recent observations of the motion of galaxies, as well as observations of the energy left over from the formation of the universe. This evidence suggests that the origin of the universe occurred approximately 13.6 billion years ago, during a point in time when the state of the universe was much hotter and more dense. The fact that light seen from almost all distant galaxies has longer wavelengths than comparable light here on earth provides evidence that the whole universe has been expanding ever since the big bang (and continues to expand today).
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Nutrition: What are Nutrients? Science Object
Science Object
Nutrition: What are Nutrients?
Grade Level: Elementary School, High School, Middle School
Science Objects are two hour on-line interactive inquiry-based content modules that help teachers better understand the science content they teach This Science Object, co-developed between FDA and NSTA, is the third of four Science Objects in the Nutrition SciPack. It explores nutrients and the specific physiological functions associated with each nutrient. Carbohydrates, fats, and proteins provide energy for body movement and physiological processes;...  [view full summary]
Science Objects are two hour on-line interactive inquiry-based content modules that help teachers better understand the science content they teach This Science Object, co-developed between FDA and NSTA, is the third of four Science Objects in the Nutrition SciPack. It explores nutrients and the specific physiological functions associated with each nutrient. Carbohydrates, fats, and proteins provide energy for body movement and physiological processes; proteins provide building material for body tissue as well as substances for important physiological processes; and vitamins and minerals regulate body processes. Water carries nutrients, provides an environment for many physiological functions and is part of the composition of the body itself. Getting too much or too little of these nutrients can cause undesired effects; good nutrition involves getting the right amounts {and in the right combinations}. Other substances in food, including phytonutrients, may also have important health benefits that are not yet well understood.
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Nutrition: What Happens to the Food I Eat? Science Object
Science Object
Nutrition: What Happens to the Food I Eat?
Grade Level: Elementary School, High School, Middle School
Science Objects are two hour on-line interactive inquiry-based content modules that help teachers better understand the science content they teach. This Science Object, co-developed between FDA and NSTA, is the second of four Science Objects in the Nutrition SciPack. It discusses how the body makes use of foods’ nutrients, after food is digested into simpler substances. These simpler substances must then be absorbed through the lining of the small...  [view full summary]
Science Objects are two hour on-line interactive inquiry-based content modules that help teachers better understand the science content they teach. This Science Object, co-developed between FDA and NSTA, is the second of four Science Objects in the Nutrition SciPack. It discusses how the body makes use of foods’ nutrients, after food is digested into simpler substances. These simpler substances must then be absorbed through the lining of the small intestine and transported for use throughout the body for physiological processes. In cells, these nutrients and substances derived from them are taken in and react to provide the biochemical constituents needed to synthesize other molecules. Some cells store energy from the breakdown of some nutrients in specific chemicals that are used to carry out the many functions of the cell. The circulatory system moves substances to the cells and removes waste products. Lungs take in oxygen for metabolism and eliminate the carbon dioxide produced, excretory systems rid the body of dissolved and solid waste products, and the skin and lungs rid the body of excess heat energy.
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Nutrition: What is Food? Science Object
Science Object
Nutrition: What is Food?
Grade Level: Elementary School, High School, Middle School
Science Objects are two hour on-line interactive inquiry-based content modules that help teachers better understand the science content they teach. This Science Object, co-developed between FDA and NSTA, is the first of four Science Objects in the Nutrition SciPack. It demonstrates that all living organisms require food for functioning, renewal, and growth. Animals use both plants and other animals as food. Food provides the necessary energy for bodily...  [view full summary]
Science Objects are two hour on-line interactive inquiry-based content modules that help teachers better understand the science content they teach. This Science Object, co-developed between FDA and NSTA, is the first of four Science Objects in the Nutrition SciPack. It demonstrates that all living organisms require food for functioning, renewal, and growth. Animals use both plants and other animals as food. Food provides the necessary energy for bodily movement and physiological processes. It also provides substances needed to repair and create bodily structures and regulate physiological processes such as cellular activity or immune responses. Nutrients, the substances and elements in food that the body requires, are classified according to their composition. For humans, these nutrients include carbohydrates, proteins, fats, vitamins, minerals, and water. Carbohydrates, fats, and protein are present in foods in larger amounts. Vitamins and minerals are present in only small amounts. Water, an essential nutrient, is part of every body cell and contributes to all physiological processes.
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Nature of Light: So, What is Light? Science Object
Science Object
Nature of Light: So, What is Light?
Grade Level: Elementary School, Middle School
Science Objects are two hour on-line interactive inquiry-based content modules that help teachers better understand the science content they teach. This Science Object is the final of four Science Objects in the Nature of Light SciPack. It provides an understanding of how sometimes the nature and behavior of electromagnetic radiation such as light can be best described using a wave model, but at other times it can be best described by using a particle...  [view full summary]
Science Objects are two hour on-line interactive inquiry-based content modules that help teachers better understand the science content they teach. This Science Object is the final of four Science Objects in the Nature of Light SciPack. It provides an understanding of how sometimes the nature and behavior of electromagnetic radiation such as light can be best described using a wave model, but at other times it can be best described by using a particle model. Particles of light called photons contain discrete amounts of energy. The energy that a photon carries is directly proportional to its frequency. The energy of a photon is inversely proportional to the wavelength of the electromagnetic radiation. Each kind of atom or molecule can only gain or lose energy only in discrete amounts so they can absorb and emit light only at frequencies and wavelengths corresponding to these amounts. These combinations of wavelengths or spectra can be used to identify the substance.
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Nature of Light: Light and Color Science Object
Science Object
Nature of Light: Light and Color
Grade Level: Elementary School, Middle School
Science Objects are two hour on-line interactive inquiry-based content modules that help teachers better understand the science content they teach. This Science Object is the third of four Science Objects in the Nature of Light SciPack. It provides conceptual and real world understanding of how the wavelengths of electromagnetic radiation affect the way they interact with different materials. We perceive differences of wavelength within the visible...  [view full summary]
Science Objects are two hour on-line interactive inquiry-based content modules that help teachers better understand the science content they teach. This Science Object is the third of four Science Objects in the Nature of Light SciPack. It provides conceptual and real world understanding of how the wavelengths of electromagnetic radiation affect the way they interact with different materials. We perceive differences of wavelength within the visible part of the spectrum as differences in color. Shorter wavelengths of light (blue) are scattered more by air molecules than longer wavelengths of light (red). When the atmosphere scatters sunlight—which is a mixture of all wavelengths—short-wavelength light (which gives us the sensation of blue) is scattered much more by air molecules than long-wavelength (red) light is. The atmosphere, therefore, appears blue and the sun seen through it by un-scattered light appears reddened. Also, materials that allow one range of wavelengths to pass through them may completely absorb others. For example, some gases in the atmosphere, including carbon dioxide and water vapor, are transparent to much of the incoming sunlight but absorb the infrared radiation from the warmed surface of Earth.
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Nature of Light: Light as Waves Science Object
Science Object
Nature of Light: Light as Waves
Grade Level: Elementary School, Middle School
Science Objects are two hour on-line interactive inquiry-based content modules that help teachers better understand the science content they teach. This Science Object is the second of four Science Objects in the Nature of Light SciPack. It provides conceptual and real world understanding of the idea that waves (including sound and seismic waves, waves on water, and light waves) have energy and can transfer energy when they interact with matter....  [view full summary]
Science Objects are two hour on-line interactive inquiry-based content modules that help teachers better understand the science content they teach. This Science Object is the second of four Science Objects in the Nature of Light SciPack. It provides conceptual and real world understanding of the idea that waves (including sound and seismic waves, waves on water, and light waves) have energy and can transfer energy when they interact with matter. Wave behavior can be described in terms of how fast the disturbance propagates, and of the distance between successive crests or troughs of the wave (the wavelength). Accelerating electric charges produce electromagnetic waves which can be organized into a spectrum of varying wavelengths (and frequencies): radio waves, microwaves, radiant heat or infrared radiation, visible light, ultraviolet radiation, x-rays, and gamma rays. These wavelengths vary from radio waves (the longest) to gamma rays (the shortest). Human eyes only respond to a narrow range of wavelengths of electromagnetic radiation—what we call visible light. In empty space, electromagnetic waves of all wavelengths move at the same speed—the "speed of light."
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Nature of Light: Characteristics of Light Science Object
Science Object
Nature of Light: Characteristics of Light
Grade Level: Elementary School, Middle School
Science Objects are two hour on-line interactive inquiry-based content modules that help teachers better understand the science content they teach. This Science Object is the first of four Science Objects in the Nature of Light SciPack. It establishes the concept that electromagnetic waves can interact with materials in different ways. For example, they can reflect off a material’s surface. We can see an object when light waves that are emitted or...  [view full summary]
Science Objects are two hour on-line interactive inquiry-based content modules that help teachers better understand the science content they teach. This Science Object is the first of four Science Objects in the Nature of Light SciPack. It establishes the concept that electromagnetic waves can interact with materials in different ways. For example, they can reflect off a material’s surface. We can see an object when light waves that are emitted or reflected by the object enter the eye. Electromagnetic waves can also pass through materials, sometimes slowing down or changing direction as a result of entering and leaving the material. Or, electromagnetic waves may be absorbed or scattered within the material. Electromagnetic waves and other waves diffract around corners, and interfere with one another in predictable ways.
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