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Heating and Warming: Sensitivity of Earth’s Climate to Atmospheric CO2

 
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[Science It Up!] Warm It!

Type: User Resource

Summary: We’ve got a great video about carbon dioxide and how it acts as a greenhouse gas to absorb and emit thermal radiation! Or, to put it in other words, we’ve got a video with hair dryers, big long equations, car exhaust, Captain Carbon himself, and a flight to the CSU power plant!

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Antarctic Sea Ice Extent Animation 2002-2008

Type: User Resource

Summary: This animation shows the annual variation of sea ice extent in the Southern Hemisphere. Throughout the winter the cold temperatures freeze more and more of the water in the Southern Ocean, gradually building up a layer of ice on the surface that covers millions of square kilometers. This ice pack generally reaches its maximum extent around September.

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Arctic Sea Ice Extent Animation 2002-2008

Type: User Resource

Summary: This animation shows the annual variation of sea ice extent in the Northern Hemisphere. Throughout the winter the cold temperatures freeze more and more of the water in the Arctic Ocean and surrounding bodies of water, gradually building up a layer of ice on the surface that covers millions of square kilometers. This ice pack generally reaches its maximum extent around March.

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Carbon Dioxide

Type: User Resource

Summary: Carbon dioxide is a colorless and non-flammable gas at normal temperature and pressure.

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Climate Sensitivity Calculator

Type: User Resource

Summary: The amount of carbon dioxide (CO2) in Earth's atmosphere has changed over time.

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Compare Maps of Antarctic Sea Ice Extent Side-by-Side

Type: User Resource

Summary: In the Southern Hemisphere (around the South Pole and Antarctica) the sea ice reaches its maximum extent in early spring, at the end of the long, cold winter. September is usually the month with the most sea ice.

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Compare Maps of Arctic Sea Ice Extent Side-by-Side

Type: User Resource

Summary: In the Northern Hemisphere (around the North Pole and the Arctic Ocean) the sea ice reaches its maximum extent in early spring, at the end of the long, cold winter. March is usually the month with the most sea ice.

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Earth's Energy Balance

Type: User Resource

Summary: Light from the Sun warms our planet. Earth radiates heat out into the frigid vacuum of space.

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Greenhouse Effect Movie - Scott Denning

Type: User Resource

Summary: Professor Scott Denning of Colorado State University explains how greenhouse gases in Earth's atmosphere warm our planet.

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Heating And Warming: Sensitivity Of Earth’s Climate To Atmospheric Co2

Type: User Resource

Summary: September 24, 2012, Web Seminar Recorded Archive

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Heating and Warming Sensitivity of Earth’s Climate to Atmospheric CO2.ppt

Type: User Resource

Summary: September 24, 2012, Web Seminar PowerPoint Presentation

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Infrared: More Than Your Eyes Can See

Type: User Resource

Summary: Dr. Michelle Thaller explains infrared light in this older video, produced by NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope (then known as the Space Infrared Telescope Facility) before it launched.

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Methane

Type: User Resource

Summary: Methane is gas that is found in small quantities in Earth's atmosphere.

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Vibrating Molecules Animation

Type: User Resource

Summary: Molecules vibrate. Molecules that have just two atoms vibrate by simply moving closer together and then further apart. The nitrogen (N2) and oxygen (O2) molecules in the animation are vibrating in this simple mode.