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Journal Cover The Science Teacher

March 2019

Computer simulations have become essential to scientific investigation and engineering design, thanks to advances in mathematical modeling, game theory, and computing technology. Simulations now provide an indispensable tool for investigating the properties of natural and built systems in science, engineering, economics, and social science.


Add to Cart Career of the Month: An Interview With Atmospheric Scientist Shawn Urbanski
The Science Teacher, Mar 19
Atmospheric scientists study the chemical composition of the atmosphere. More specifically, they look at how atmospheric gases, liquids, and solids interact both with each other and with the earth's surface. This helps people understand such phenomena as air pollution, ozone depletion, and climate change. Shawn Urbanski is a research physical scientist at the U.S. Forest Service’s Rocky Mountain Research Station in Missoula, Montana. He studies wildfire smoke chemistry and the impact of wildfire smoke on air quality.
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Add to Cart Do Plants Breathe?
The Science Teacher, Mar 19
The idea that plants do photosynthesis but do not do cellular respiration is a common misconception among middle and high school students that often stems from an over-simplification of these processes in diagrams and formal science instruction. The activity presented here uses a conceptual change approach (Nussbaum & Novick, 1982) and an online simulation to facilitate high school students’ accurate conceptions of the relationship between photosynthesis and cellular respiration in plants.
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Add to Cart Editor's Corner: More than a Game
The Science Teacher, Mar 19
Computer simulations have become essential to scientific investigation and engineering design, thanks to advances in mathematical modeling, game theory, and computing technology. Simulations now provide an indispensable tool for investigating the properties of natural and built systems in science, engineering, economics, and social science.
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Add to Cart Focus on Physics: Quickly Teaching Speed, Velocity, and Acceleration—Part 2
The Science Teacher, Mar 19
In the February 2019 issue we looked at teaching speed and velocity. Now we’re ready to tackle acceleration.
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Add to Cart From Bean to Cup
The Science Teacher, Mar 19
Average User Rating:
Coffee comes to the science lab
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Add to Cart Right to the Source: Envisioning the Possibilities of Educational Gaming with Carl Sagan
The Science Teacher, Mar 19
In the late summer of 1983, when video games were relatively new, astronomer, cosmologist, and science communicator Carl Sagan recognized their potential value as he imagined “how to design a home video game which would teach a great deal of astronomy in a context as exciting as most violent video games.” His typed notes reflected his interest in creating a game that would include a hundred thousand stars in its model galaxy and take place over stellar evolutionary events.
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Add to Cart Spicing Up Your Classroom With Games
The Science Teacher, Mar 19
Games allow teachers to interact with their students in a different way than they normally do. They also have the potential to challenge and assess students’ understanding of content. Games allow me to “play” with my students in ways that other learning activities do not (Kirkland and O’Riordan 2010). I can be silly, competitive, cooperative, lenient, creative, and supportive alongside my students in a way that I cannot during lab activities, assessments, or even project work time.
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Add to Cart Teaching With Simulations
The Science Teacher, Mar 19
Teachers use simulations for student motivation, content learning, and engagement in science practices.
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