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Journal Cover The Science Teacher

April 2019

This issue is our 24th consecutive annual issue devoted to the theme, “Science for All.” Each year this special issue presents ideas and teaching strategies for helping all learners find success in their science classes. The primary goal is to provide instructional methods that can help narrow persistent academic achievement gaps associated with ethnicity, socioeconomic status, gender, physical disabilities, limited English-language proficiency, and learning differences. All students need access to rigorous, high-quality science education to prepare for the demands of work and citizenship in the modern world. But too many young people are getting an education that falls far short: youth who are disproportionately African American, Latinx, Native American, English learners, and those from low-income families.


Add to Cart A Web of Ideas
The Science Teacher, Apr 19
Fostering scientific discourse with spider web discussions
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Add to Cart Career of the Month: Ecologist
The Science Teacher, Apr 19
Ecologists are biologists who study entire ecosystems and the interactions among their living and non-living components. Ecology can be applied in areas such as conservation biology, natural resource management, and even economics. Todd Elliott, who grew up in North Carolina, has been working as a freelance ecologist, photographer, and educator, and is currently working on his PhD in ecology in Australia.
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Add to Cart Editor's Corner: Science For All
The Science Teacher, Apr 19
This issue of The Science Teacher marks our 24th consecutive annual issue devoted to the theme, “Science for All.” Each year this special issue presents ideas and teaching strategies for helping all learners find success in their science classes. The primary goal is to provide instructional methods that can help narrow persistent academic achievement gaps associated with ethnicity, socioeconomic status, gender, physical disabilities, limited English-language proficiency, and learning differences.
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Add to Cart Exit Tickets
The Science Teacher, Apr 19
Understanding students, adapting instruction, and addressing equity
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Add to Cart Focus on Physics: Refraction
The Science Teacher, Apr 19
Exploring light as it moves from one medium to another with the intriguing result of different speeds—the bending of light we call refraction.
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Add to Cart Investigating Urban Trees
The Science Teacher, Apr 19
Mobile geospatial technologies enable high school students to engage in authentic scientific data collection and analysis that promote spatial-thinking and reasoning skills, as well as problem-solving in a school’s local environment. We developed and implemented an Ecological Services investigation aligned to the Next Generation Science Standards in an urban high school with a large population of economically disadvantaged students. The investigation includes local field data collection with mobile devices and classroom data analysis using a freely available Web Geographic Information System or GIS. The field investigation focuses on observation skills and uses a dichotomous key to identify local tree genus and species. Student data analysis focuses on spatial patterns of tree species surrounding the school and exploration of the geospatial relationship between percent tree canopy cover and crime statistics in the city. Students were actively engaged with using geospatial technologies to investigate relevant socio-environmental issues in their community. Students thought critically about the costs and benefits associated with urban trees and proposed changes to their community that will have a positive impact on their local natural and built environment.
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Add to Cart Letter to the Editor
The Science Teacher, Apr 19
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Add to Cart Right to the Source: Science for All—19th Century "Edutainment"
The Science Teacher, Apr 19
In 19th-century America, one popular way people obtained new scientific information was through traveling lectures and science demonstrations, sometimes held in large halls called “lyceums.” Before the advent of radio and television, these were large public events designed to both educate and entertain. Often, such scientific demonstrations were great spectacles—as much or more about marketing and entertainment as they were about education.
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Add to Cart The Perfect Match
The Science Teacher, Apr 19
A lesson that focuses on the intricate co-evolution of flowers with their pollinators is one way to help students learn the delicate balance in nature and help ensure that our actions do not upset this balance. In this lesson students use the engineering design process to engineer a flower that is a perfect model for its chosen pollinator. Next, they construct an explanation of the coevolution process that occurs between flowers and their pollinators. The lesson addresses HS-LS4-4 Biological Evolution: Unity and Diversity from NGSS and covers Common Core Writing Standard CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.WHST.11-12.1.B. The various activities in this lesson allow for individual work, whole class discussion, and group work consisting of groups of 2-3 students. This lesson is a great way to use plants as the model for teaching evolutionary concepts in a biology class, can be done in conjunction with other lessons on floral reproductive anatomy, or as a stand-alone lesson as long as attention is given to new vocabulary. At the conclusion of this lesson, students will have a model of a flower that they will use as an aid in constructing an argument on the coevolution of flowers and their pollinators.
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