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Journal Cover The Science Teacher

January 2009

Now, more than ever before, the Arctic and Antarctic have moved to the forefront of public attention. Read this issue to learn more about events in these polar regions. As part of the current International Polar Year, get your students involved in the future of our Earth, which is intimately connected to polar science research.


Add to Library Arctic Research and Writing
The Science Teacher, Jan 09
Recently, senior-level physics students joined thousands of scientists from over 60 nations to examine a wide range of physical, biological, and social research topics as part of the International Polar Year (IPY). Through a National Science Foundation (NSF)–funded research project, these students applied physics concepts to the study of Arctic sea ice. They participated in an authentic proposal writing contest focused on dramatic changes observed in the Arctic environment and developed a research question to examine why these changes are occurring. This article describes their participation in this exciting hands-on project.
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Add to Library Editor’s Corner: Today’s Polar Science
The Science Teacher, Jan 09
The Earth’s polar regions once seemed a remote realm, accessible only through the compelling tales of intrepid explorer-scientists. Accounts of these polar explorers have long fascinated our imagination. Today, Earth’s polar regions are perhaps more accessible now than in the time of Ernest Shackleton and the other early explorers, but they continue to have a vivid impact on the human imagination. More than ever before, we are becoming aware that the future of Earth is intimately connected to events in the Arctic and Antarctic. Our students need to understand and appreciate these remarkable places.
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Add to Library Health Wise: January 2009
The Science Teacher, Jan 09
I have a lot of competitive athletes in my classes. If they decide to use steroids, what effect will this have on their health?
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Add to Library Safer Science: Personal Protective Equipment—It’s the Law!
The Science Teacher, Jan 09
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In addition to the Occupational Health and Safety Administration (OSHA) personal protective equipment (PPE) standard—OSHA Laboratory Standard 29CFR 1910.132—and other professional prudent practices, many states have protective eye devise statutes. PPE is third in the hierarchy approach to dealing with safety. In this priority list, the employer must first evaluate the feasibility of engineering controls and administrative procedures before considering the use of PPE. This month’s Safer Science column includes components that reflect the body of the PPE assessment that should be addressed by teachers, students, and supervisors in science laboratories or field experiences.
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Add to Library The Prepared Practitioner: Understanding Heat and Temperature
The Science Teacher, Jan 09
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Since this issue of The Science Teacher has a polar theme, the author thought this would be a particularly appropriate time to examine research about students’ preconceived ideas about heat—or the lack thereof. Heat and temperature are difficult, abstract concepts. Because the concepts are difficult to grasp yet important for understanding the general nature of matter and other concepts (e.g., the science behind phase changes, enthalpy), extensive research literature exists that discusses misconceptions.
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