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Different levels of understanding | Posted in Elementary Science

One thing I have done is leveled puzzles...not hand outs but actual puzzles. If a student finishes their work, they can go to a side table and work on a puzzle of their choice. I started with simple puzzles but over the course of the year, I increased their difficulty. I used jigsaw puzzles or tangrams...I found one kind of puzzle where all the pieces were square with four different pictures on each side and the pieces fit together in only one way--these were extremely challenging and students took many days/weeks to complete (sorry I don't remember what they were called). Puzzles are quiet, independent activities. With only five students, they could collaborate on more difficult puzzles. If they are old enough, you could have them design a puzzle for their peers and let them actually print/cut the puzzle to give to the other students. Great way to engage them in  and teach about the design process.


Lisa Mitchell

1st Grade Activities | Posted in Early Childhood

Hello Kristina. In Texas children learn about clouds in first grade. I saw an activity that used shaving cream in a jar to represent the different types of clouds. I also think you need food coloring. You can find the exact materials on Pinterest. Basically it is a hands on way to provide students with a visual of various clouds. Also shaving cream is usually inexpensive. Another option is to teach moon phases with oreo cookies. Not sure what you are looking for but I hope that helps. I always check pinterest for fun ideas.


Naomi Bourrous

Implementing STEM in my classroom | Posted in STEM

Hello Leslie! I'm also currently working with kindergarteners for my student teaching. I think that one easy way to implement STEM in a classroom would be to start off small by using the kind of language you would hear in a science classroom. Using vocabulary such as "experiment, predict, and observation" are just small ways you could implement STEM. Additionally, you could think about the kinds of lessons that you are presenting to your students. You could think about which of your lessons could be presented as a problem or a question that students can explore. By doing this, your curious, little learners can think about problem solving and research.


Krystal Kennedy

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