Forums & User Community

Most Active Users This Week

National Leader Boards Online Now Online Advisors Community Update

Most Active Users Last Month
#Science60 Contributors

Recent Posts

Learning Science Concepts through Play | Posted in Early Childhood

In the last couple of years, I have learned just how important play is to students. Play is just as important in the elementary grades, as it is for students preschool and below. I have learned that allowing students to play through STEM activities, allows them to work out their problem solving skills, monitor their emotions, and enhance their social skills. I believe that as teachers we need to remember that we can't hover. We need to allow our students to have play time. They need this time to enhance their skills in multiple different areas. One of my favorite play activities that students can do is through clay. I have seen so many different students play with clay, but I have never seen the same creation from a different student. This play can be as simple as having clay on the table and letting them create whatever they want, or it can be as complex as asking them to create different structures to hold something or withhold wind or water. I really like the link that you added! I believe that it is so important to allow students to learn and socialize through play as well as different experiments, and these different experiments would be great in the classroom.


Tera Porter

STEM and Fairy Tales | Posted in STEM

This is a great idea to getting STEM into the classroom. Since the idea of STEM is somewhat a new idea i'm glad this shows how easily it can be incorporated. I also like how this activity can be used with many different books or novels so as a teacher you don't have to struggle to get a specific book.


Olivia Meincke

Inquiry-Based Learning in Elementary School | Posted in Elementary Science

I believe that inquiry based learning is also extremely beneficial for students especially at the lower elementary grades. Like mentioned by others, this type of learning helps the students think for themselves. There are also different types of inquiry based learning, depending on how much direction you would like to give the students. If you are going to completely hand over the reins to the students this is called an open inquiry. In this inquiry the students will be in charge of coming up with a question/problem, procedure, and results/ analysis. This would be a great way to get the students to think creatively and problem solve. However, for the younger students it could be hard for them to come up with everything on their own. So, for this age group I would recommend a structured inquiry. For this, you as the teacher would come up with the question/problem, and the procedure for everyone to do. Then the students would have to analyze and reason as to why these things occurred. In my science methods class we did an experiment called "dancing raisins for our structured inquiry. We were given the question of, "Why do raisins, when added to a cup of sparkling water float to the top of the cup?" We were also given the procedure of putting five raisins in two cups with the same amount of liquid, one with sparkling water and one with regular water. Then it was our job to analyze why it was that the raisins floated in the sparkling water. I think that this would be a great idea of a structured inquiry for younger elementary grades. You can structure it, but still gets them thinking!


Kennedy Carber

Online Now (24)
Sidney Alvis, Kyli Bumbray, Heidi Burnett, Carrie Butler, Miranda Castellano, Tareen Chowdhury, Leah Colburn, Lydia Coley, Tessa Dall, Kathleen Delgado, Jeffery Edwards, Aaron Hansen, Sharia Jowers, Israel Medina, Alexandra Miree, Grace Molfenter, Joanne Park, Michele Shaffer, Julia Shepard, Noemi Silva, Laura Solache, Dario Soto, Azucena Velasquez, Christian Wilson

Forum content is subject to the same rules as NSTA List Serves. Rules and disclaimers