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inquiry Based Lesson Plans | Posted in New Teachers

Hi Stephanie, 

There are a lot of ways to incorporate inquiry into a second grade classroom.  If you aren't very familar with inquiry, a good place to start is with this article from Science and Children (The Many Levels of Inquiry) that discusses the four types of inquiry. It gives some sample suggestions of how to use the four types of inquiry in your classroom.  

From there, I would look my curriculum and decide what types of inquiry I would want to use as I am teaching. What types of topics are you going to be covering in second grade?  What information do students need to know in third grade?  Knowing that information better helps in planning.  If you your state has adopted NGSS and you are unsure, you can always start by looking at the NGSS standards that can be found here. 

Another resource you might look at is an ebook, A Year of Inquiry, that the Learning Center has at a nominal fee.  

Respond back and we can brainstorm together.

 

 

 


Ruth Hutson

Periodic Table | Posted in Physical Science

I have used a few techniques that have really helped.   One of them is Periodic Table Battleship.   This was even fun for the Chemistry students.   I also have an interactive Periodic Table that they can log in with their cellphone and pull up realistic examples of the elements.  I have also found interactive tables online.  I also have written the elements out on index cards and they have to split into groups and the first team to lay them out correctly on the floor is the winner!


Raquel Dugan-Dibble

classroom management during experiments | Posted in Early Childhood

Hi Selena! I am currently a student teacher in a math and science classroom, and I get the chance to watch my mentor teacher enforce the most effective classroom management skills I have ever seen. She uses positive reinforcement constantly. The school I am at has a reward system where they give "merits" and "demerits" for behavior. These are backed up by a system where if students accumulate a certain amount of merits, they can choose to spend them in the classroom "store" or save them for a special privilege. My mentor says things out loud to the class like "I appreciate how ___ is following my instructions, I am going to give them a merit." or "These students are showing patience as they wait for the next activity quietly, I will give them a merit." Sometimes it is while some students are off tasks, so they will redirect their actions so that they can also receive merits. If it doesn't help, she will give demerits after fair warning. Another really great technique is giving access to science experiment materials after modeling and giving explicit instructions on what they are expected to do with them. First, tell them what to do, then tell them the voice level you expect them to be at. Showing appreciation for those that followed instructions constantly. I hope this helps! Good luck!


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