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inquiry Based Lesson Plans | Posted in New Teachers

Hi Stephanie, 

There are a lot of ways to incorporate inquiry into a second grade classroom.  If you aren't very familar with inquiry, a good place to start is with this article from Science and Children (The Many Levels of Inquiry) that discusses the four types of inquiry. It gives some sample suggestions of how to use the four types of inquiry in your classroom.  

From there, I would look my curriculum and decide what types of inquiry I would want to use as I am teaching. What types of topics are you going to be covering in second grade?  What information do students need to know in third grade?  Knowing that information better helps in planning.  If you your state has adopted NGSS and you are unsure, you can always start by looking at the NGSS standards that can be found here. 

Another resource you might look at is an ebook, A Year of Inquiry, that the Learning Center has at a nominal fee.  

Respond back and we can brainstorm together.

 

 

 


Ruth Hutson

Teaching a Topic against one's belief | Posted in General Science and Teaching

Our courses all have curriculum maps (required) that are posted to the district website for parent review. So, there is no further burden on the teacher to inform parents of any "troubling" topics. Science provides the framework and model for understanding our world is not about anyone's beliefs. If a parent does complain, they can be informed that the curriculum maps - which reflect the curriculum as approved by the local school,board - are available for their review.


Cris DeWolf

Field Trips | Posted in General Science and Teaching

Hi Jessica! I am currently a student teacher in 2nd grade. We recently took a field trip to our city's Children's Museum. There were tons of different hands on activities for them to engage in over a broad subject matter. However, they did have some wonderful areas for science specifically. One part of our Children's museum has a place called "force works" where the children can use basically a large cauldron that rushes water through the entire exhibit! The children can see how the force of the waves move whatever the put in the cauldron. In addition to this, there were areas where the children were able to see the life cycle of certain animals, specifically chicks. These are just a few of the science-related exhibits there are, but it was a great way to get the students more engaged and interested in how science works!


Rachel Steadman

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