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Teaching about observable features of animals | Posted in Early Childhood

Hi Guys!

I am a preservice teacher who is trying to plan some lessons out about how to explain to students about grouping plants and animals according to observable features. I have a few activites planned, but I am struggling to think of different activities to do to help with teaching them. Providing reasons for them is really difficult for me to think of how to come about that.

Thanks!


Victoria Wang

STEM programs | Posted in STEM

STEM stands for science, technology, engineering, and mathematics. I don’t believe that this should be thought of as a new concept because we teach students science and math almost every day, and they encounter these subjects every day. Students walk outside, and there’s science all around them. Students use math every day to pay for drinks or food, simple addition or subtraction, and counting. They use technology every day too with cell phones, laptops, Ipads, etc. These topics aren’t hard for the students to learn because they already know things about them and encounter them every day. We just need to turn them into an educational teaching that promotes higher thinking.

I would implement STEM within my class by having my Kindergarten students work on simple yet, challenging experiments. For example, my students need to build a bridge for 21 elephant counters. All of my students know how to count to 100, and they all know how to make and build things like bridges, towers, cutouts, etc. Now they need to use trial and error to see if what they think works (science). They would then need to count how many elephants they can fit (math) on the bridge they built (engineering).  In the end, the teacher can help the students record their finding on video or add the audio to a picture using an Ipad (technology).


Lindsey Huynh

Guest Speakers in the Middle School Classroom | Posted in Next Generation Science Standards

Aloha! I teach 7th grade life science from 8:40a-2:20p and have about 8 guest speakers a year. I have found that most guest speakers are willing to stay all day and repeat themselves!! I usually provide them with water and lunch/snacks. I have found that most guest speakers do not provide notes for students to take, so I ask for their PowerPoint before they come in order to create a student handout. My students are much more engaged when they have something to follow and take notes on. Go for it! Guest speakers enrich the unit and experience! Kimberly


Kimberly Tangaro

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