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Learning Science Concepts through Play | Posted in Early Childhood

In the last couple of years, I have learned just how important play is to students. Play is just as important in the elementary grades, as it is for students preschool and below. I have learned that allowing students to play through STEM activities, allows them to work out their problem solving skills, monitor their emotions, and enhance their social skills. I believe that as teachers we need to remember that we can't hover. We need to allow our students to have play time. They need this time to enhance their skills in multiple different areas. One of my favorite play activities that students can do is through clay. I have seen so many different students play with clay, but I have never seen the same creation from a different student. This play can be as simple as having clay on the table and letting them create whatever they want, or it can be as complex as asking them to create different structures to hold something or withhold wind or water. I really like the link that you added! I believe that it is so important to allow students to learn and socialize through play as well as different experiments, and these different experiments would be great in the classroom.


Tera Porter

Teaching for Conceptual Understanding in Science | Posted in Professional Learning

We used the book for our PLC - Middle School Science in New York in the spring. Teachers found the ideas very useful and opened possibilities for some of them, trying and implementing new strategies and forms of formative assessment. The main focus was to explore the Conceptual Change Instructional Model. The plan this year is for teachers coming to the PLC for the first time to read and explore during the year in both in-person and online sessions, and those who were in the PLC last year will deepen in the discussion of their topics of interest.


Adaliz Gonzalez

Inquiry-Based Learning in Elementary School | Posted in Elementary Science

Hi Kevin! I am currently taking a undergraduate course called "Methods of Teaching Science" and we also have a major focus on inquiry-based learning. Personally, I believe that inquiry-based learning is great for students because it gives them a chance to think for themselves instead of merely being told an answer. Furthermore, science is an ongoing investigation of the natural world so even professional scientists are in a continual process of reviewing and asking questions. One way to incorporate this type of learning is to follow the 5E model (Engage, Explore, Explain, Elaborate, Evaluate) which easily aligns with Next Generation Science Standards. I suggest becoming familiar with both of these, if you are not already! I cannot think of any cons of introducing inquiry-based learning to lower elementary grades. Journal Article that addresses your question: https://learningcenter.nsta.org/resource/default.aspx?id=10.2505%2f4%2fsc17_055_01_18  I hope some of this is useful to you! 


Brooke Tatz

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