Forums & User Community

Most Active Users This Week

National Leader Boards Online Now Online Advisors Community Update

Most Active Users Last Month
#Science60 Contributors

Recent Posts

Chem for those who do not like it | Posted in Chemistry

Hi! I think you have hit the reason for NGSS right on the head! The phenomenon approach to learning is what drives those students in the classroom. When teachers engage their students with phenomena they have a true curiosity or interest in the interest levels in the classroom drive up. Students are shifting from this rote memorization or even just learning content in isolation; to having a role and a mission of trying to figure something out. Chemistry is especially daunting in isolation. When you give students a task, then build a story around that task where now they need to know this information to complete the task. They will be more engaged. The hardest part is choosing a phenomenon that fits your students. You should figure out what are they interested in. What are things that would hook them? Once you get to know your students more you will know the types of phenomenon’s that will drive them.


Jessica Holman

First Day of School Science Activities | Posted in Life Science

Hello Lauren, A good beginning of the school year activity would be one that gets students thinking about the scientific progress to set the standard for the labs that would come for the rest of the year. Some ways to do this are setting up different stations that could be good for observation like, the characteristics of a flower, or even the way worms interact. You can have students make hypothesis based on their conceptions of the different stations. You can also do another exercise that can be done in perspective lab groups as a team building exercise. This consists of giving each group a handful of marshmallows and spaghetti sticks. They have to building a tower with the materials and see who's stands up the longest. Its quite a fun first day activity. Hope this helps!


Antonia Passalacqua

Animals in the classroom? | Posted in Life Science

In preparation to have my own classroom, considering the pros and cons of having a class pet is important. While I agree with past posts that having a pet is a great way to help students take ownership of their classroom, practice responsibility by caring for the animal, and inspire curiosity and research, I also appreciate everyone's advice on precautions and even possible downfalls of taking animals out of their natural environment. Ideally, it would be fantastic for kids to take lots of field trips to partake in learning experiences in the 'real world'. Logistically and financially this is not an efficient option most of the time. So its important to bring a variety of real artifacts and specimen into the classroom to enrich learning experiences. The ethics concern in respect to having animals caged in your class is something important to consider. I think should be a topic of discussion among students before getting a class pet. If students decide having a pet is unethical, I really like the bird feeder option. Bird watching can be done almost anywhere. Catching bugs and then returning them to their natural habitat may also be a good compromise to having a pet. I think its important to demonstrate critical thinking for students and will continue weighing the pros and cons of having animals in the classroom.


Jordan Hammerand

Online Now (31)
Jacqueline Allen, Cristy Bean, Cyndi Chambers, Jennifer Cleaves, Patricia Cook, Roger Cramer, Crystal Cuellar, Kaisha Davis, Loretha Daymon, Navdeep Dhindsa, Stewart Diffenderfer, Megan Doty, Kristen Dunn, Eric Eisaman, Eric Fatzinger, Sylvanus Golakai, Amanda Guardia, Kate Hannon, Melanie Hawkins, Lori Henrickson, Lauren Henry, Ann G. Hollenbeck, Gary Jones, Patricia Lamarca, Adolfo Martinez, Martha McIlveene, Flavio Mendez, Karen Myers, Elizabeth Shalhoup, Elizabeth Trevino, Luretha Wilson

Forum content is subject to the same rules as NSTA List Serves. Rules and disclaimers