Chemistry

Halloween Demos

Simple and safe Halloween demos , Can anyone help

Sulekha Bhasin
Sulekha Bhasin
2525 Activity Points

This activity is very exspensive. Did you by chance purchase this?

Micola Mitchell
Micola Mitchell
975 Activity Points

There is an active discussion on this topic currently on the listserve. The recommendation there is a resource from Flynn http://www.flinnsci.com/store/Scripts/prodView.asp?idproduct=14574 Just a personal note. When I use demonstrations, I do my best to connect these to science. I think too often we use demonstrations to get attention without taking the next step to connect the demo. I agree that demos are a great way to engage students but I often have trouble myself connecting the demo to the science. Somethings students are just too distracted with the spectacle and forget that there is science going on.

Pamela Auburn
Pamela Auburn
68515 Activity Points

In keeping with Pam's comment about the science behind these Halloween demos here is some information about What’s the chemistry behind eerie Halloween lighting?

http://www.newsobserver.com/2014/10/26/4256007/whats-the-che...eerie.html

Arlene Jurewicz-Leighton
Arlene Jurewicz Leighton
42070 Activity Points

Of course, dry ice demonstration (phases of matter)from solid to gas.
http://www.stevespanglerscience.com/lab/experiments/awesome-dry-ice-experiments

Joni Ingram
Joni Ingram
1705 Activity Points

I know I'm late here, but I like Flinn's Reappearing Pumpkin and I tie it to oxidation-reduction reactions with my AP students....

http://www.flinnsci.com/store/Scripts/prodView.asp?idproduct=16235

Rebecca Falin
Rebecca Falin
71400 Activity Points

Thank you for this suggestion.  I have always liked this demo and the seasonal element makes it even more engaging.  Having a link to all the necessary materials was also helpful.

Michael Roche
Michael Roche
105 Activity Points

The dry ice demonstration is one of my favorite ones. It is a great demo to introduce to children and also great visual for gatherings. If you don't mind the mess you can change it up a bit by carving a pumpkin and adding soap and water to the bottom. Then you can add the dry ice and see the bubbles come out of the pumpkins mouth. I have done this with my nephew and he loves it.

Jorge Ramos
jorge ramos
2140 Activity Points

I love this pumpkin dry ice demonstration idea. It sounds like fun, and I know kids would really enjoy this demonstration. I would like to try this out sometime either with my future students or just on my own with my younger cousins.

Michaela Aiello
Michaela Aiello
330 Activity Points

that sounds like a great way to get attention, and make a fun connection to science

Elizabeth Epstein
elizabeth epstein
370 Activity Points

Arielle Gutierrez
Arielle Gutierrez
995 Activity Points

http://creeksidelearning.com/halloween-science-experiments/#_a5y_p=2476019 found a few Halloween inspired science fun!

Rudi Luna
Rudi Herrera
2200 Activity Points

I find the brain pop website has such amazing and fun experiments for elementary!!!

Kourtney Fyffe
Kourtney Fyffe
1185 Activity Points

I agree especially for the younger children it is a great tool to integrate to a lesson for a hook!

Johana Montoya
Johana Montoya
1345 Activity Points

Najah Hijazi
Najah Hijazi
1365 Activity Points

This activity is very exspensive. Did you by chance purchase this?

Zulaika Reyes
Zulaika Reyes
2615 Activity Points

Hi. there is an activity called melting candy. I think will be great to do with an experiment because it allows them with the opportunity to see what candy can melt with depending on what solution the students are using. http://lemonlimeadventures.com/dissolving-candy-pumpkins-halloween-science-kids/

Jessica Pacheco
Jessica Pacheco
1370 Activity Points

I like the idea of using the candy as one of the experiment to discover which one can melt. I have done something like this back in my elementary days, where we get to use marshmallow as one of the experiment.

Linda Ngo
Linda Ngo
2735 Activity Points

My favorite is the "Exploding Pumpkin" or also called the "Self-Carving Pumpkin" You take a pumpkin and carve it in a very simple pattern (triangles and rectangles). After you're done, put all of the pieces back into their holes to make the pumpkin "look" like it's not carved. In the back where nobody can see, make a small hole large enough for a lit match to fit through (do not plug that one back). To make the pumpkin "carve itself", put an empty soda can with approximately 30 mL of water in it inside the pumpkin. Drop a small piece of calcium carbide into the can and replace the lid of the pumpkin. After about 30 minutes, place a lit match (8" stem or larger) in the back. As soon as the gas gets ignited, the pumpkin will explode from pressure buildup and all of the pieces that you carved before will fall out. This leaves you with a magic pumpkin! We do this every year at Halloween for the new classes and it's the most exciting part of the day!

Alison Lambright
Alison Lambright
170 Activity Points

My favorite is the "Exploding Pumpkin" or also called the "Self-Carving Pumpkin" You take a pumpkin and carve it in a very simple pattern (triangles and rectangles). After you're done, put all of the pieces back into their holes to make the pumpkin "look" like it's not carved. In the back where nobody can see, make a small hole large enough for a lit match to fit through (do not plug that one back). To make the pumpkin "carve itself", put an empty soda can with approximately 30 mL of water in it inside the pumpkin. Drop a small piece of calcium carbide into the can and replace the lid of the pumpkin. After about 30 minutes, place a lit match (8" stem or larger) in the back. As soon as the gas gets ignited, the pumpkin will explode from pressure buildup and all of the pieces that you carved before will fall out. This leaves you with a magic pumpkin! We do this every year at Halloween for the new classes and it's the most exciting part of the day!

Alison Lambright
Alison Lambright
170 Activity Points

My favorite is the "Exploding Pumpkin" or also called the "Self-Carving Pumpkin" You take a pumpkin and carve it in a very simple pattern (triangles and rectangles). After you're done, put all of the pieces back into their holes to make the pumpkin "look" like it's not carved. In the back where nobody can see, make a small hole large enough for a lit match to fit through (do not plug that one back). To make the pumpkin "carve itself", put an empty soda can with approximately 30 mL of water in it inside the pumpkin. Drop a small piece of calcium carbide into the can and replace the lid of the pumpkin. After about 30 minutes, place a lit match (8" stem or larger) in the back. As soon as the gas gets ignited, the pumpkin will explode from pressure buildup and all of the pieces that you carved before will fall out. This leaves you with a magic pumpkin! We do this every year at Halloween for the new classes and it's the most exciting part of the day!

Alison Lambright
Alison Lambright
170 Activity Points

I have no idea how I posted this three times, so I'm sorry! I don't know how to delete it.

Alison Lambright
Alison Lambright
170 Activity Points

The magical pumpkin project sounds amazing. I think that will be a fun project for my preschool kids to watch. I would like to practice it at home before doing it with the kids. Cool idea:)

Ingrid Alvarado
Ingrid Alvarado
120 Activity Points

Pre-Cut a jack-o-lantern, have a small reaction happen within the pumpkin that is quick and flashy. The reaction will pop the eyes, mouth, and nose out of the pumpkin! Better to do it in the dark!

Kyler Berg
Kyler Berg
130 Activity Points

Excellent ideas all around. I would want to do something like disprove the possibility a popular spooky halloween mainstay... but I wonder if disproving something fun would be more of a buzzkill than and exciting holiday treat...

Zeben Gorman
Zeben Gorman
375 Activity Points

Yes, the Steve Spangler Science Resources are very good and are extremely safe for students to handle.

Steven Autieri
Steven Autieri
844 Activity Points

Steven, this is a good resource. I subscribe to his site so I get emails throughout the year with cool experiments.

Pamela Dupre
Pamela Dupre
86174 Activity Points

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