Elementary Science

student time management during experiments

What would be a good way to keep students concience of how much time they have to complete an experiment and how much time they need to dedicate to certain things without having to constantly remind them or model the experiments while they are doing it? 

Melissa Tamez
Melissa Tamez
50 Activity Points

Hi Melissa! I would suggest, if possible, to break up the experiment into sections. You may set a time limit on each section of the project while they are to focus one step at a time. If the experiment cannot be broken up and is somewhat lengthy, I would place a timer on the whiteboard so that they may look at how much time is being spent while completing the lesson. You may also alert them every 5 minutes or so for them to recognize the pace they are keeping. Hope this helps!

Taylor Bain
Taylor Bain
695 Activity Points

One thing that I have seen throughout being in classrooms was that the teacher would explain one part of the experiment. Then she would let the students go back to there areas to work on it and if they had questions they were able to ask then. She then repeated this for each step. At the end of the experiment when it was done she asked the students to play around with it and see if they remember each step. I think it's a great idea to get students to ask questions throughout it. You could stop and just ask or bring up different conversations that can get the students thinking.

 

 

Hannah Brumley
Hannah Brumley
2235 Activity Points

A good way could be telling the students that they have a certain time to finsh put a timer with that time in the projector so all students can see the time that they have for that experiment. 

Cindy Arenas
Cindy Arenas
85 Activity Points

A good way could be telling the students that they have a certain time to finsh put a timer with that time in the projector so all students can see the time that they have for that experiment. 

Cindy Arenas
Cindy Arenas
85 Activity Points

I teach third graders who have a very poor sense of time in general. I break activities into smaller tasks with preset time limits. When each task is done we review whole-class so those who didn't finish are back up to speed. If it's an actual experiment I am careful to support groups that are likely to struggle on each task. I also have students who struggle to transition from one task to another, so I generally give verbal cues for five minutes and two minutes to go. Occasionally on longer tasks I give them a halfway reminder as well.

Kathleen Stidham
Kathleen Stidham
350 Activity Points

Kathleen,

I too, like your third graders, have a very poor sense of time. The only difference is that I am a college student getting ready to become an educator! When I have taught lessons, time management has been my biggest obsticle. I have started to plan my lessons and break them down into smaller parts, very similar to your sugguestion of what you should do for students. I really like that idea for science lessons because it not only helps with time management but also allows students to really focus and reflect on each part of the experiment rather than rushing through to the end. I am glad you mentioned supporting groups of students who may struggle, that is so important. Even if you are pausing between each section to discuss with the entire class, if a group of students is constantly not able to finish their experiment it will likely affect their learning. I also like that you mentioned giving extra supports to students who struggle to transition from one task to another. One way that I have seen teachers help students keep track of time is by projecting a countdown timer onto the board. The students really got into keeping track of their time independently. They would also help remind other students of the time if they got done early. I think it helped me, as a teacher, when we used a timer during the lesson because I too could keep an eye on how much time we have left. It also kept me accountable because sometimes I have a tendancy to add a few extra mintues for students to finish up, but it ends up affecting the end of my lesson.

You had some great ideas that I cant wait to impliment in my own classroom.

Thanks,

Rebecca

Rebecca Hall
Rebecca Hall
1960 Activity Points

Maybe having a timer that goes off a couple of minutes before they're supposed to be done will be great to get them to transition early if their transitions tend to be slow.

Ramiro Rodriguez
Ramiro Rodriguez
670 Activity Points

Maybe having a timer that goes off a couple of minutes before they're supposed to be done will be great to get them to transition early if their transitions tend to be slow.

Ramiro Rodriguez
Ramiro Rodriguez
670 Activity Points

Hello, I am a student at FIU and I am required to complete field hours at different elementary schools. I've observed a 5E lesson being conducted with the students, and as mentioned by many above, the classroom teacher used a timer on the promeathan board. This allowed the students to glance at it throughout their experiments to know the amount of time they have left to write out observations/investigations. It was a great, organized strategy. 

Marissa Mendez
Marissa Mendez
500 Activity Points

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