STEM

STEM for Girls

I ran a couple of robotic activities this year for middle schoolers and attracted very few girls. Does anyone have any ideas for getting girls more interested in STEM? I am thinking of creating a "girls only" club. Am also looking for ideas for mentors and funding.

Patty McGinnis
Patricia McGinnis
25580 Activity Points

STEM Think Tank and Conference... will be held at the Harpeth Hall School in Nashville, TN, July 18-20. This conference focuses on females in STEM. Our conference theme this year is Lessons Up and Down the Pipeline - K12 to University to Corporate. We've got over 60 presentations and workshops scheduled during six concurrent sessions along with some great speakers, pre-conference workshops, etc. Registration is only $250 before May 31. I hope that many of you will consider attending! Contact me if you need more information or have questions. http://www.harpethhall.org/podium/default.aspx?t=160024&goback=.gde_3391879_member_111852605

Pamela Auburn
Pamela Auburn
68525 Activity Points

A resource that may be of interest The Center for STEM Education for Girls http://stemefg.org/

Pamela Auburn
Pamela Auburn
68525 Activity Points

Patty, there has been a great deal of cognitive research done on how middle school girls learn best in science and math. Some of the research might seem dated but the general gist is to provide opportunities for girls to work together, but not necessarily to sequester them from middle school boys. I'll scroll through some of the research, but this site from TERC might be of some interest. http://etf.terc.edu/ Eyes to the Future has several objectives: Middle school girls... * creating an online magazine to tell other middle-school girls about science and technology * communicating with women role models in science and technology fields * developing relationships with high-school girls who have stayed involved in math and science in high school * engaging in enriched science activities "Eyes to the Future" is a multi-age mentoring program that supports middle-school girls as they make the transition to high school and make informed choices about the opportunities available to them in high school and beyond. "Eyes to the Future" uses the Web to link middle-school girls with high-school girls in their school districts who have stayed interested in math and science and with women who use science, math, and technology in their careers. The mentoring relationships that result help middle-school girls see how their work at school relates to "real life" -- before they have chosen or ruled out possible futures for themselves. Given your long term relationship with future female scholars in your district, you might consider a mentorship of this nature. Patty

Patricia Rourke
Patricia Rourke
45915 Activity Points

Thanks, Patty. I will check into the resources you provided. I think one place to start would be the local college---perhaps they can help provide some mentoring for a program.

Patty McGinnis
Patricia McGinnis
25580 Activity Points

I would conduct some secondary research and find out why girls seem to wane in scholastics at this grade level, then counter balance that. Also I would approach different informal groups such as Girls Scouts or Character Building societies or organizations, their values are usually quite strong and intact. Offer your classes to these groups. You will be doing them a tremendous service and you may greater response.

Jeri Hallberg Harmon de Tamez
Jeri Hallberg Harmon de Tamez
1730 Activity Points

Hi Patricia, I have also considered establishing an ALL Girls Robotics team after coaching robotics for two years. Here in Georgia, there is a RoboChix Conference geared toward all girl robotics teams. You can contact them @circuitrunners@gmail.com and inquire about their philosophies and resources to establishing a girl group. Hope this helps!

Bejanae Kareem
Bejanae Kareem
1020 Activity Points

Here are grant leads for funding to establishing your group.

Attachments

Bejanae Kareem
Bejanae Kareem
1020 Activity Points

That you for all the information and the great grant tips!

Patty McGinnis
Patricia McGinnis
25580 Activity Points

Patricia: I find and use with very good results a unique material: The DVD serial "The Ascent of Man" by Bronowsky, to stimulate my students. Eduardo Testart

Eduardo Testart
Eduardo Testart
135 Activity Points

Hi All: I found a great website called STEM for Girls. http://www.stemgirls.com/ It looks interesting and is career oriented. Adah

Adah Stock
Adah Stock
101510 Activity Points

Thanks, Adah. I just checked the site; it looks like they are just getting established.

Patty McGinnis
Patricia McGinnis
25580 Activity Points

Let's take it to the girls, Patty. Did you interview those who attended and perhaps some who did not to glean ideas from the source? I would be interested in your feedback and if you did talk with the girls, something about your techniques in talking with them or in eliciting ideas on how to attract more girls. Thanks a bunch for sharing.... ~patty

Patricia Rourke
Patricia Rourke
45915 Activity Points

Generation STEM is national research report investigating girls' perceptions, attitudes, and interests in the subjects and general field of science, technology, engineering and math (STEM) from the voices of girls themselves. The report consists of a literature review, as well as qualitative (focus group) and quantitative (survey) research with 1,000 girls across the country. The study finds that girls are interested in STEM and aspire to STEM careers, but need further exposure and education about what STEM careers can offer, and how STEM can help girls make a difference in the world. You can read the entire report here http://www.girlscouts.org/research/publications/stem/generation_stem_what_girls_say.asp

Pamela Auburn
Pamela Auburn
68525 Activity Points

The AAUW also has great resources for promoting STEM to girls http://www.aauw.org/stem/STEMcamps.cfm AAUW branches across the country sponsor math and science camps predominantly for young women in middle school to spark their interest and participation in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics. Tech Trek and Tech Savvy, two of our most successful branch events, are being taken national.

Pamela Auburn
Pamela Auburn
68525 Activity Points

The National Girls Collaborative Project http://www.ngcproject.org/ The National Girls Collaborative Project™ (NGCP) is designed to reach girl-serving STEM organizations across the United States. An intense recruitment and selection process began Fall 2005 to identify sponsoring organizations to lead local collaboratives. The organizations selected to host local collaboratives are impressive in their knowledge, experience, and diversity. As a group, the local collaboratives have an extensive network of organizations and individuals engaged in pursuing this common goal and the opportunity to share with and learn from each other. They vary in focus areas and populations served and include higher education institutions, community-based organizations, private non-profits, but all work to increase gender equity in STEM fields.

Pamela Auburn
Pamela Auburn
68525 Activity Points

A Statement from the White House on the next generation of STEM for girls http://www.whitehouse.gov/blog/2012/04/24/next-generation-girls-stem This is very inspiring

Pamela Auburn
Pamela Auburn
68525 Activity Points

http://www.greatscienceforgirls.org/resources-research/effective-stem-practices The Educational Equity Center (EEC) at FHI 360 through a grant from the National Science Foundation has developed Great Science for Girls: Extension Services for Gender Equity in Science through After School Programs (GSG), to provide inquiry-based, informal science learning programs that will stimulate girls’ curiosity, interest and persistence in STEM and break down the barriers of gender stereotyping. Working with intermediaries (organizations that provide training and technical assistance to afterschool programs in their region) around the country GSG delivers curricula, research, and professional development and consulting services to help promote the concept that science is, indeed, a “girl thing.” Great resources!

Pamela Auburn
Pamela Auburn
68525 Activity Points

Here is a small collection of resources on STEM for Girls


STEM For Girls Collection
(13 items)
Engineer Girl
     -User Uploaded Resource
Science Club for Girls
     -User Uploaded Resource
Tech Bridge
     -User Uploaded Resource

Pamela Auburn
Pamela Auburn
68525 Activity Points

This collection includes biographical information on women in STEM


Biographies of Women in Science Collection
(8 items)
Secret Lives of Scientists and Engineers
     -User Uploaded Resource
4000 Years of Women in Science
     -User Uploaded Resource
Biographies of Women Mathematicians
     -User Uploaded Resource

Pamela Auburn
Pamela Auburn
68525 Activity Points

http://forgirls.girlscouts.org/other-resources-stem/ For the past few years, USA Girl Scouts has been pushing the STEM initiative to get girls into science, technology, engineering and math. Have a look and maybe see if your local Girl Scout troop is willing to come in and partner with your girls.

Cindee Parker
Cindee Parker
320 Activity Points

PLEASE GO TO WAR EAGLES EDUCATION PAGE. THERE YOU WILL FIND A LIST OF SCHOLARSHIPS FOR YOUNG WOMEN. ALSO YOU CAN GO TO THE WOMEN IN AVIATION WEBSITE AND ALSO COPY AND DISTRIBUTE THE ENTIRE LIST OF 2013 SCHOLARSHIPS. PLEASE SHARE THIS VERY VALUABLE RESOURCE!!!

Jeri Hallberg Harmon de Tamez
Jeri Hallberg Harmon de Tamez
1730 Activity Points

I teach elementary and did an after school girls science club. I didn't define what would be learning though, I let the girls decide. After each session I asked what they wanted to do, let them what materials I had, and they went from there. I felt that if they were going to give their time after school than they should be able to deem how theyrevere going to spend it.I only took 8 girls since it was my first time doing this but also wanted to be able to have a small group. Also, I let the girls "play" more than anything with the task at hand. For example, we did marshmallow and toothpick bridges and We started out with the idea of shapes and observations and then I said "ok now you're turn, build" I didn't define rules or expectations because I wanted it to be a chance for them to explore. Girls whom are and are not confident with science in the regular structured classroom joined and they had fun while exploring with ideas and concepts. It's my idea that if we let girls play and gain confidence through their own exploration, including failures and reflection, we'd see more intrinsic confidence.

Diana Potts
Diana Potts
125 Activity Points

I am posting my collection of Girls in science. I hope you find something useful.


Girls in Science Collection
(18 items)
A Mentoring Program with Hands-on Laboratory Experiments: Bridging the Needs of Elementary School Students and Women Undergraduates in a Science Community Program
     -Journal Article
Turtle Girls
     -Journal Article
Teaching through Trade Books: The Science of Invention
     -Journal Article

Adah Stock
Adah Stock
101510 Activity Points

Science educators seeking a supplemental STEM program for girls can check out Byron Academy, a STEM initaitive for girls with an interest in a science, technology, engineering and math. The program exposes girls to role models, engages them in projects and supports them academically. http://www.byronacademy.org Creating an account at Byron Academy will provide you with access to information, courses, academic support, speakers and other STEM resources. Many of these services are free to our students with an account.

Pamela Auburn
Pamela Auburn
68525 Activity Points

Has anyone looked at the following website: http://www.ngcproject.org/program/club-stemchicks It is called STEM Chicks. Check it out. Adah

Adah Stock
Adah Stock
101510 Activity Points

I think the idea for a STEM club for girls is a great idea. A workshop instructor in my Science Methods course just started his own after-school STEM club for girls at his daughter's middle school and he has been sharing his experiences with our class. Not only does this club encourage girls to develop their interests in the male-dominated science and technology fields, but it also gives them a safe and friendly environment to express ideas and ask questions without the fear of being embarrassed or overpowered by their male peers. One idea that I really liked from this club was the idea of having a volunteer club mentor. Their mentor is a prominent female scientist who can answer the girls' questions about being a woman in a STEM field. Here is a link from PBS that allows you to find a STEM club near you! You may be able to connect with some of these club leaders to find out more information. http://www.pbs.org/teachers/scigirls/club/

Katarina Lincalis
Katarina Lincalis
2340 Activity Points

Hi Katarina, I am actually starting a lunch and learn program and the first one will be targeted only for girls. We are going to discuss building self-confidence and getting over the fear of speaking up in class. Your post is making me think maybe I need an all-girls robotics club. Thanks for the resources.

Patty McGinnis
Patricia McGinnis
25580 Activity Points

I've taken middle school students to STEM for Girls events at the local university.
It was a wonderful day of science career exploration with experts in a wide variety of science fields.

Our local university also just started a separate STEM for Boys event (middle school). This is a terrific addition to their STEM career day options.

Great STEM career exploration activities for both genders!

Dorothy

Dorothy Ginnett
Dorothy Ginnett
28185 Activity Points

Here is a small collection of resources on Stem for Girls


STEM For Girls Collection
(13 items)
Engineer Girl
     -User Uploaded Resource
Science Club for Girls
     -User Uploaded Resource
Tech Bridge
     -User Uploaded Resource

Pamela Auburn
Pamela Auburn
68525 Activity Points

This piece was recently published in the Chronicle of Higher Education There have been many efforts in recent years to draw more women into STEM fields. While women have made gains, they are still far less likely than men to major in such fields, especially engineering and computer science. Why? We asked a group of scholars and experts to respond. http://chronicle.com/article/Why-STEM-Fields-Still-Dont/135302/?goback=.gde_3391879_member_180439874

Pamela Auburn
Pamela Auburn
68525 Activity Points

Listen to our latest R.Science podcast to find out what Professor Uta Frith FRS thought of the recent group edit-a-thon, in partnership with Wikimedia UK, to improve Wikipedia articles about women in science. http://blogs.royalsociety.org/inside-science/2012/11/07/scientific-heroines/?utm_source=feedburner&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=Feed%3A+inside-science+%28The+Royal+Society+-+Inside+Science%29 Podcast here http://downloads.royalsociety.org/audio/rscience/121031.mp3

Pamela Auburn
Pamela Auburn
68525 Activity Points

NAP press has several books on women scientists. Here is the list wit a link at the bottom. These would make wonderful gifts for a STEM Girl or her teacher. Bone Detective: The Story of Forensic Anthropologist Diane France Beyond Jupiter: The Story of Planetary Astronomer Heidi Hammel Forecast Earth: The Story of Climate Scientist Inez Fung Gene Hunter: The Story of Neuropsychologist Nancy Wexler Gorilla Mountain: The Story of Wildlife Biologist Amy Vedder Nature's Machines: The Story of Biomechanist Mimi Koehl People Person: The Story of Sociologist Marta Tienda Robo World: The Story of Robot Designer Cynthia Breazeal Space Rocks: The Story of Planetary Geologist Adriana Ocampo Strong Force: The Story of Physicist Shirley Ann Jackson The entire set is available here http://www.nap.edu/catalog.php?record_id=11572&utm_medium=etmail&utm_source=The%20National%20Academies%20Press&utm_campaign=Holiday+Mailer+2012&utm_content=Downloader&utm_term=

Pamela Auburn
Pamela Auburn
68525 Activity Points

I can appreciate the perspective of this physics teacher who discussed the need to go beyond the textbook in engaging girls is STEM http://www.ascd.org/ascd-express/vol8/804-liak.aspx

Pamela Auburn
Pamela Auburn
68525 Activity Points

The "FabFems Spotlight" highlights women from the FabFems Role Model Directory. There are more than 100 FabFems profiles in the database and entries are added daily. FabFems are enthusiastic about the science and technology work they do and want to inspire a future generation of FabFems. Encourage girls to visit FabFems to search profiles, connect with role models, and find resources on career pathways. http://www.fabfems.org/

Pamela Auburn
Pamela Auburn
68525 Activity Points

This site has done an outstanding job of including the biographies of a very diverse group of scientists and engineers http://www.usasciencefestival.org/2014-festival/2014-role-models-in-science-engineering.html

Pamela Auburn
Pamela Auburn
68525 Activity Points

Generation STEM: What Girls Say about Science, Technology, Engineering, and Math The Girl Scout Research Institute has released Generation STEM: What Girls Say about Science, Technology, Engineering, and Math (2012). http://www.girlscouts.org/research/publications/stem/generation_stem_what_girls_say.asp Generation STEM is a national research report investigating girls’ perceptions, attitudes, and interests in the subjects and general field of science, technology, engineering and math (STEM) from the voices of girls themselves. The report consists of a literature review, as well as qualitative (focus group) and quantitative (survey) research with 1,000 girls across the United States. The study finds that girls are interested in STEM and aspire to STEM careers, but need further exposure and education about what STEM careers can offer, and how STEM can help girls make a difference in the world.

Pamela Auburn
Pamela Auburn
68525 Activity Points

http://www.sparksummit.com/2012/07/18/an-alternative-to-the-lego-friends-collection-an-interview-with-limor-fried/ Limor Fried (AKA Ladyada), founder of Adafruit Industries is the first female engineer EVER to grace the cover of WIRED magazine - about time! And you can read here

Pamela Auburn
Pamela Auburn
68525 Activity Points

AAUW's just-released, new study, Graduating to a Pay Gap shows that engineering is an "equal pay" field! There is no significant difference in the pay received by men and women working as engineers one year after graduation. However, ONLY 39% of women who graduate as engineers enter the engineering workforce--compared with 57% of male engineering grads. Hear a full review of the Pay Gap study as well discussion of the steps employers, policy-makers, and individuals can take to achieve pay equity for women in the workforce. Two Distinguished Presenters from American Association of University Women Lisa Maatz, Director, Public Policy and Government Relations As AAUW's top policy adviser, Maatz works to advance AAUW's priority issues in our nation's capital. She is a sought-after speaker across the nation and in our nation's capital, and has a large and devoted following on Twitter. Maatz has a reputation for her strategic approach to legislation and advocacy. Christianne Corbett, Senior Researcher Corbett is a Senior Researcher at the AAUW where her focus is gender equity in education and the workplace. She holds a master's degree in cultural anthropology and bachelor's degrees in government and aerospace engineering. Prior to coming to AAUW, she worked on Capitol Hill as a legislative fellow and worked as a mechanical design engineer for eight years. Register for the webinar here https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/8752015047374589440

Pamela Auburn
Pamela Auburn
68525 Activity Points

I was reading through my email when I came upon this. A Cal Poly Pomona freshman has found a unique venue to promote engineering: beauty pageants. Mechanical engineering student Haley Amber Heiselt competed in the Miss California USA contest representing Riverside County. She didn’t win, but made the most of the chance to encourage more young women – particularly minorities and women – to pursue engineering http://blog.engineeringstudents.org/?p=1323

Pamela Auburn
Pamela Auburn
68525 Activity Points

I was wondering if anyone has thoughts on a recent article in the NYTImes providing data that girls lead i STEM most places in the world but not in the US http://www.nytimes.com/interactive/2013/02/04/science/girls-lead-in-science-exam-but-not-in-the-united-states.html?ref=hannahfairfield I find the discussion of the interplay of culture and gender roles interesting and not at all what I would have expected.

Pamela Auburn
Pamela Auburn
68525 Activity Points

I would love to create a STEM Girls program! Hmmm I think its a go! How awesome would that be to develop a program here in Hawaii for girls to excel in science, to increase higher number of females in the science industry.

Treena Pieper
Treena Pieper
440 Activity Points

This is really an interesting thread. I teach Design and Engineering at my middle school and have about 12% of the class roster being girls. One thing I have in my favor is they talk well amongst each other and each year my numbers grow. As to why they don’t sign up for the class or STEM after school projects was a mystery to me until I asked them. In school they love what I do, so once I have them hooked, they stay and then get their friends involved. Unfortunately, the other elective that tends to be really popular with girls is Leadership. At this age, they naturally are leaders amongst the school, so they tend to gravitate toward that elective. After school they are torn amongst the other things in life they love as well. Ballet, musical productions, sports teams, and of course there is always shopping. While the girls are genuinely interested, they really have a lot of diverse interests that they are trying out during the 7th and 8th grade formative years. The plus side is we are beginning to see more and more female role models that are showing our girls that it’s okay to be smart and grow up to be an Engineer, or Scientist, or Doctor … The opportunities are endless, now I just have to work on my patience.

Sandy Gady
Sandy Gady
43095 Activity Points

Sandy, Thank you for sharing your insightful comments on the many options open to young girls in middle school. I agree with your assessment and it is frustrating but understandable that young females want to test their abilities and taste from so many flavors on the smorgasbord of options available to them. This trend continues in high school and sports, band, drama, and cheer leading add their strong enticements to student options, both male and female. When I was teaching high school, I started a morning club. Quite a few students came, male and female, to work on design and construction projects as well as the physics Olympiad. I provided donuts, bagels, hot chocolate and tea in my office which adjoined the classroom. Transportation was a problem for some but those who really wanted to attend found a way to participate. The lab was also open after school and I used my office as an adjunct lab so that students could drop in during their library/study hall/ free periods to work on projects. I left the door open between the office and the classroom and the office and the hall so that I could listen in. If my classes were doing labs, the other students felt free to come in and talk with me about what they were doing. This also spread the interest among the classes. Again, thanks for taking this thread in your direction, Sandy. ~patty

Patricia Rourke
Patricia Rourke
45915 Activity Points

I think at this age (middle school) in order to attract more girls, the curriculum needs to be more appealing. At this age, girls surveyed said their highest rating of importance were friendship and acceptability. They seek a best friend, to be liked by their peers, seek acceptance and always concerned with like-ability. In this century, the generation of young females are influenced by the media to be accepted to what is mainstream beauty. (Size, shape and wardrobe).In order to draw in female students a curriculum will need to be created which will intrigue the science minds and interest of young girls but to also strengthen their character. Having a background in the area of pageantry and educational background in science I find that my students are interested in being liked and accepted by their peers and dont have a high a interest in science. They want to be like me, but dont know the first step. So I work twice as hard to inspire them daily, in self confidence, self direction, leadership & communication skills. I always work to push them by building character skills at the same time, so the feel confident in their decisions as well as their science knowledge. I am working on writing a grant for a self-esteem course which incorporates science. I hope i get funded one day. It is a continual work in progress, continual editing after editing.

Treena Pieper
Treena Pieper
440 Activity Points

Thanks to everyone who has posted so many great ideas for getting young girls interested in STEM career fields. In addition to all of the great ideas already presented, I'd also like to suggest two fantastic programs from PBS. First is Design Squad. The Design Squad program is geared toward upper middle and high school aged students. The second is SciGirls. Which is geared for girls ages 8-12. Both of these programs are fantastic and help inspire girls in science by introducing them to students who are their age and young women who are actively participating in science endeavors. They are both fantastic programs!

Maureen Stover
Maureen Stover
41030 Activity Points

Sunday morning NPR featured a piece on the new book "Girls of Atomic City" covering the work women did in Oak Ridge to purify uranium for the atomic bomb http://www.girlsofatomiccity.com/ http://www.npr.org/2013/03/03/172908135/secretly-working-to-win-the-war-in-atomic-city

Pamela Auburn
Pamela Auburn
68525 Activity Points

The new museum of mathematics is open in NY City. Heidi Blum offers support in an advertisement http://momath.org/

Pamela Auburn
Pamela Auburn
68525 Activity Points

Patty, When I taught in middle school, my focus was on girls’ interest in science. We had several meetings during the day where invited girls were excused from their classes to attend a presentation/speaker by a female scientist in the field. We had refreshments like a reception to make it special. Since my dissertation was on variables that correlated with girls going into STEM, I was very cognizant of encouraging the girls I had in (science) class to focus on science careers, e.g., notes to girls attached to assignments, encouragement when I signed their yearbooks, etc. Middle school is a great age to inspire girls. However, Treena makes a good point. Girls need to be encouraged to be self-confident and supported in their proclivities to science. They need to have a role model that they want to emulate. When I moved to the high school, I started a Women in Science Club. We met after school once a month. I would have a female scientist in the field come in and speak with the girls, e.g., veterinarian, physician, etc. at each meeting. I remember one year the university was sponsoring an all-day event of women in science/medical professions that was set up like a conference. The attendees would select which sessions (which careers) they wanted to learn about. I had 20 girls that attended. I remember one of the girls who attended, ended up in the career that she had learned about that day. Here is a great website for promoting engineering for girls. http://www.engineeryourlife.org/

Kathy Sparrow
Kathy Sparrow
46710 Activity Points

I just started looking through this discussion line. As a middle school science teacher, I have had and after school science program for many years. At my current school, I refer to it as STEM club and it is for 5-8th grade one day a week after school. Most of my students are girls. This is the years that they are interested and the key is to keep them interested. At a previous school I ran a similar program. Many of the girls in that initial program are currently in college in the science field. We can encourage them, but we must also give them the opportunities to explore science in all forms. For my afterschool program, I ask them what they want to explore- some want to design and build with KNEX, some what to program robots, some what to carry out experiments for local science competiton, some want to use microscopes and other basic equipment. The bottom line is to give them the opportunities. Something i started this school year in my classes is to do some type of monthly design challenge. They work in groups of their chosing and must meet the criteria for the challenge. I wasn't sure how well this was going to work. Everyday I get students whne they walk in "How much time are we getting for Junk Box?" or "Are we doing Junk Box today?" I asked last week my 6th and 7th graders- what they thought of Junk box and whether I should do it next year. It was and overwhelming YES. When I asked why- One of my female students said- because it makes us think and have to figure things out. That sums up what science is.

Theresa Rabogliatti
Theresa Rabogliatti
16990 Activity Points

The bottom line is to give them the opportunities. Something i started this school year in my classes is to do some type of monthly design challenge. They work in groups of their chosing and must meet the criteria for the challenge. I wasn't sure how well this was going to work. Everyday I get students whne they walk in "How much time are we getting for Junk Box?" or "Are we doing Junk Box today?" I asked last week my 6th and 7th graders- what they thought of Junk box and whether I should do it next year. It was and overwhelming YES. When I asked why- One of my female students said- because it makes us think and have to figure things out. That sums up what science is.

Theresa -Thanks for this post. Hope that you continue with Junk Box !

Arlene Jurewicz-Leighton
Arlene Jurewicz Leighton
44543 Activity Points

STEM Technovation For Women The Technovation Challenge — funded by ONR to introduce girls to science, technology, engineering and math (STEM) careers — provides an opportunity for girls from around the country to design and pitch mobile phone apps to leaders in computer science and business. The challenge spans 12 weeks and ends May 1 at the World Pitch event in San Francisco. During the challenge, teams of high school girls are mentored in design, computer coding and business; nearly every mentor is female. http://science.dodlive.mil/2013/03/21/stem-technovation-for-women/

Pamela Auburn
Pamela Auburn
68525 Activity Points

Hello,
I try to spend 15 minutes a week instruction time identifying and briefly visiting a new STEM related website. This week I turned to our monthly April 2013 NSTA Reports newspaper for inspiration!

I was not disappointed, in the Science Teachers' Grab Bagpull-out section I located a new website from L'Oreal USA that is geared to young women and highlighting possible STEM related careers.

Although the site offers many similar activities (career requirements, sample pay scales, videos, interviews and a personality quiz), there were a few unique spins to this site as well. L'Oreal, being a health and beauty industry, highlights Health & Beauty STEM related careers! ** A major plus to my fashion conscious Middle School young ladies. The site also has a current list of weekend and summer camps being offered in the USA.

This site is worth a glance and definitely one you may want to forward to your parents/guardians for rainy summer day viewing!

Enjoy your day, Alyce

Alyce Dalzell
Alyce Dalzell
64075 Activity Points

An additional Women in STEM site that was highlighted in April 2013's NSTA Reports monthly newspaper is sponsored by Teaching Tolerance, an excellent resource for all levels of education and disciplines that encourages and supports conversation for those who care about diversity, equal opportunity and respect for differences in schools. Teaching Tolerance's site inlcudes an area that discusses Legislating Equal Access.

Enjoy your day, Alyce

Alyce Dalzell
Alyce Dalzell
64075 Activity Points

The National Alliance for partnership in Equity. Lots of great readings to help with equity issues .

Kathy Wright
Kathy Wright
100 Activity Points

Thank you for the great resources you all have added to this website. I will research the opportunities and keep you posted on our success. Girls Rock!!

Ronnda Cargile
Ronnda Cargile Hughes
3610 Activity Points

The Huffington Post is hosting a blog on Girls in Stem. I thought some of you following this thread would be interested. http://www.huffingtonpost.com/news/girls-in-stem/?goback=.gde_3391879_member_234155384

Pamela Auburn
Pamela Auburn
68525 Activity Points

This piece from Scientific American advocates more story telling to attract girls to STEM http://blogs.scientificamerican.com/budding-scientist/2013/04/16/to-attract-more-girls-to-stem-bring-storytelling-to-science/?goback=.gde_1146517_member_234667434 There are specific suggestions on fiction to include and a link to a recent report on the status on girls in stem http://www.news.pitt.edu/women_STEM

Pamela Auburn
Pamela Auburn
68525 Activity Points

Hi, I have found that girls really enjoy engineering projects.

Janice Novello
Janice Novello
6985 Activity Points

The issue of how to attract and retain women in science can get me a bit carried away. Today I read a post from the Royal Society of Chemistry that lead me to a number of other sources. FOr those who are equally invested, I am posting links and details here First here is the link to to RSC post regarding getting more women involved in RSC events http://blogs.royalsociety.org/inside-science/2013/04/29/ensuring-diversity-at-royal-society-events/?utm_source=feedburner&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=Feed%3A+inside-science+%28The+Royal+Society+-+Inside+Science%29 Referenced in this post is an article in PNAS "Science faculty’s subtle gender biases favor male students" found here. http://www.pnas.org/content/109/41/16474 This is a classic study where subjects are asked to evaluate resumes of male and female candidates. These are in fact identical resumes with male and female names attached. This got me looking at Stereotyped: Investigating Gender in Introductory Science Courses indicating that problems start much earlier than hiring decisions I am also planning to add this blog to the few that I follow http://www.feministe.us/blog/archives/2012/09/24/why-arent-there-more-women-at-stem-conferences-this-time-its-statistical/

Pamela Auburn
Pamela Auburn
68525 Activity Points

I did a thesis on this topic and have a program at my school. These two resources helped! Leopold, C., & Jean, K. (2011). Guess what? This experiment is "sick"!: Girls understanding and exploring STEM stuff. ATEA Journal, 38(2), 16-18. Molina, B. (2012, October 16). Teaching for the Future: Steering girls to science. USA TODAY: Latest World and US News - USATODAY.com. Retrieved April 8, 2013, from http://www.usatoday.com/story/news/nation/2012/10/15/teaching-for-future-steering-girls-science/1630391/


Brandy Whitney
405 Activity Points

We are looking at using http://www.ngcproject.org/ to help us get more girls interested in STEM :-)

Shannon Hudson
Shannon Hudson
2405 Activity Points

Mystery of the Missing Women in Science New York Times Science Club for Girls' executive director offered some ideas on the conundrum of why girls still don't choose science [url=http://www.wtop.com/1226/3433874/Steering-girls-toward-STEM-Statistics-and-solutions-] Steering Girls Toward STEM: Statistics and Solutions Rachel Nania,[/url] WTOP Research from the U.S. Department of Commerce shows more men than women have STEM degrees. Some industry leaders, such as Karen Purcell, electrical engineer and founder, owner and president of PK Electrical, say outreach to girls must begin earlier. Purcell recommends increasing girls' exposure to STEM through after-school activities and clubs and making them more aware of STEM career options

Pamela Auburn
Pamela Auburn
68525 Activity Points

The STEM Gender Gap NPR
The number of girls and women studying the sciences has steadily increased each year, but there is still a gender gap in higher education and the work force. Researchers Andresse St. Rose and Catherine Riegle-Crumb and Linda Kekelis, executive director of Techbridge, discuss the social and environmental factors that contribute to this disparity

Pamela Auburn
Pamela Auburn
68525 Activity Points

For Girls from Displaced Families, an Introduction to Engineering Devin Kelly, Los Angeles Times
Cal State Long Beach recruited 29 girls from a transitional housing community to live on campus and study engineering for a week. 'It's giving her hope,' one mother said.

TTU English Instructor Investigates Communication Issues in Engineering
TTU English instructor Beth Powell is conducting research to discover if women are dropping out of engineering fields because of differences in speech styles and interpersonal communication habits gained almost subconsciously through experience, or tacit knowledge.

Pamela Auburn
Pamela Auburn
68525 Activity Points

The Importance of STEM Education for Latina Mothers Maria T. Cardona, Mamiverse
Bipartisan immigration reform legislation passed by the U.S. Senate includes a national fund for states to dedicate to enhancing their STEM education programs.This fund would be created by a new fee on employers in the U.S. who hire foreign workers for currently unfilled high-skilled jobs

Pamela Auburn
Pamela Auburn
68525 Activity Points

According to a study by the Business Higher Education Forum, 60 Percent of students lose interest in science and mathematics between 1st and 8th grade with a precipitous drop in 5th grade.

Pamela Auburn
Pamela Auburn
68525 Activity Points

If you live in Houston, this is a great STEM opportunity October 12 https://sallyridescience.com/events/festivals

Carmen Cruz
Carmen Cruz
2125 Activity Points

Now this was a surprise

The number of female STEM workers has increased since the 1970s, Landivar notes, but women are still underrepresented in engineering and computer occupations, which account for more than 80 percent of STEM employment. In fact, since the 1990s, women’s participation in computer science careers has declined.

There is an infographic here

Pamela Auburn
Pamela Auburn
68525 Activity Points

The most common question from young women engineers? What to wear
"When a young physicist asks me what to wear to work, she's not asking for fall-fashion trends. She's actually asking: 'How do I fit in at my office, where everyone else is a man?'

Pamela Auburn
Pamela Auburn
68525 Activity Points

Teen job interest survey shows STEM skills decline
The U.S. Department of Labor forecasts strong job growth in STEM fields, but a new study indicates teenagers may think those careers aren't as cool as they were even a year ago. A national sample of teenagers ages 14 to 18 found a 17 percent drop off in interest in jobs in the STEM or medical field. The big new category: "I don't know."

Pamela Auburn
Pamela Auburn
68525 Activity Points

98% of women find engineering rewarding

Survey finds early influence vital to career choice
Female engineers are still in a minority in the UK but a new survey led by engineering giant Atkins has found that 98% of them find it a rewarding and satisfying profession to be in.

Pamela Auburn
Pamela Auburn
68525 Activity Points

[url=http://www.fastcoexist.com/3018313/these-teenage-girls-are-some-of-the-most-promising-scientists-of-the-future] These Teenage Girls Are Some Of The Most Promising Scientists Of The Future[/url] Girls made up more than half of the finalists at Google's Science Fair, the largest in the world. From turning banana peels into plastic to diagnosing skin cancer, here were a few of our favorite projects.

Pamela Auburn
Pamela Auburn
68525 Activity Points

I thought it would be interesting to see how many NSTA Learning Center Resources there were with the term "girl" in them. I was pleasantly surprised to find over 40. Anyone else wanting to puruse thoat resources may do so by using the advanced search feature of the Learning Center. Just type the word girl for the keyword and hit the search tab.
There are several interesting career choice articles.
Carolyn

Carolyn Mohr
Carolyn Mohr
86423 Activity Points

I would try and incorporate some STEM projects that are focused on a project that is specifically tailored to girls. This way you could keep the STEM club co-ed but hopefully attract more girls once they find out about the activity.

Kaitlyn Quinn
Kaitlyn Quinn
1465 Activity Points

How Harvey Mudd Transformed Its Computer Science Program — And Nearly Closed Its Gender Gap http://techcrunch.com/2013/10/10/how-harvey-mudd-transformed-its-computer-science-program-and-nearly-closed-its-gender-gap/

Pamela Auburn
Pamela Auburn
68525 Activity Points

Why Tech’s Hottest Companies Want To Hire More Female Engineers http://techcrunch.com/2013/10/06/why-tech-companies-hiring-female-engineers/

Pamela Auburn
Pamela Auburn
68525 Activity Points

WOMEN'S INITIATIVE INSPIRING TOMORROW'S ENGINEERS TODAY There are approximately 16 million female students enrolled in middle schools and high schools in the United States today. Of these girls, only about 1% will go on to receive a degree in engineering, while 8% of the boys they go to school with will receive engineering degrees. http://web.mit.edu/wi/

Pamela Auburn
Pamela Auburn
68525 Activity Points

The Feminist Press at CUNY presents Under the Microscope, which collects stories from women involved with STEM with the goal of publishing a survival guide for young women in science. http://www.underthemicroscope.com/

Pamela Auburn
Pamela Auburn
68525 Activity Points

Why Are Girls Not Pursuing Computer Science Degrees? In elementary school, girls and boys like computer science almost equally (68% boys, 66% girls) Girls and boys score equally on the AP computer science exam When girls are told that boys are naturally better at computer science, their test scores were 75% lower than boys. If they were not told this ahead of time, they scored the same http://www.edudemic.com/girls-computer-science-degrees/

Pamela Auburn
Pamela Auburn
68525 Activity Points

I have a few girls in my class that I can see have an interest in STEM related careers. I try my best to fuel this interest. I recently offered my girls the chance to participate in a competition next year that is available only for females involved in STEM. They are excited and eager to compete.

Kaycee Valcourt
Kaycee Valcourt
7815 Activity Points

Join us for the webinar to learn about SciGirls, award-winning DVDs and educational activities that feature real girls and will energize your science, technology and engineering classes. The NEW Season 2 Collection has just been released, drawing on cutting-edge research about what engages girls in STEM learning and careers. How do you get your students, female and male, excited about science, technology, engineering and math (STEM)? Are you familiar with the differences in male and female learning styles and how that impacts your classrooms? In this webinar you will: * Learn about differences in female and male learning styles, and how this impacts your classrooms. * Hear the proven strategies for engaging girls in STEM. * Get tips to apply SciGirls Seven principles in your classes. * See sneak previews of the exciting, engaging SciGirls videos! ******************************************** Register now to reserve your spot: http://www.iwitts.org/training/free-webinar ******************************************** Join me on Wednesday, December 11 at 11 AM PT / 2 PM ET Space is limited, so be sure to register right away. See you there! Presented by: Donna Milgram, Executive Director of the Institute for Women in Trades, Technology & Science (IWITTS)

Pamela Auburn
Pamela Auburn
68525 Activity Points

Project-based learning could help attract and retain women in STEM, study suggests | Inside Higher Ed insidehighered.com

When researchers at Worcester Polytechnic Institute began surveying alumni to assess how their project-based curriculum impacted their students in the long term, they simply hoped to see that students did well after graduating. That appeared to be true.

Pamela Auburn
Pamela Auburn
68525 Activity Points

Sharing a short video commercial and article if you have not seen it yet. http://bits.blogs.nytimes.com/2013/11/20/a-viral-video-encourages-girls-to-become-engineers/?src=me&ref=general&_r=0

Eileen LaTorre
Eileen LaTorre
845 Activity Points

Special Issue of the International Journal of Gender, Science and Technology titled Gendered Pathways Towards (and away from) STEM Fields
Special Issue: Gendered Pathways Towards (and away from) STEM Fields

Editorial: Gendered Pathways Towards (and away from) STEM Fields Abstract PDF
Helen Watt, Noortje Jansen, Gertje Joukes 178-183

Keynote - Gender and STEM: Opting in versus dropping out Abstract PDF
Jacquelynne S. Eccles 184-186

(How) Does Gender Matter in the Choice of a STEM Teaching Career and Later Teaching Behaviours? Abstract PDF
Helen M. G. Watt, Paul W. Richardson, Christelle Devos 187-206

Mathematics Interest and Achievement: What Role Do Perceived Parent and Teacher Support Play? A Longitudinal Analysis Abstract PDF
Rebecca Lazarides, Angela Ittel 207-231

The Role of Peer Support for Girls and Women in STEM: Implications for Identity and Anticipated Retention Abstract PDF
Rachael Robnett 232-253

Gender-related Values, Perceptions of Discrimination, and Mentoring in STEM Graduate Training Abstract PDF
Amy Roberson Hayes, Rebecca S. Bigler 254-280

Is the Brain the Key to a Better Understanding of Gender Differences in the Classroom? Abstract PDF
Jeffrey Derks, Lydia Krabbendam 281-291

Gender and STEM in Germany: Policies Enhancing Women's Participation in Academia Abstract PDF
Kathinka L. Best, Ulrike Sanwald, Susanne Ihsen, Angela Ittel 292-304

Long Term, Interrelated Interventions to Increase Women’s Participation in STEM in the Netherlands Abstract PDF
Noortje Jansen, Gertje Joukes 305-316

The Influence of a Two-Day Recruitment Event on Female Upper Secondary Students’ Motivation for Science and Technology Higher Education Abstract PDF
Fredrik Jensen, Maria Vetleseter Bøe

Pamela Auburn
Pamela Auburn
68525 Activity Points

[url=http://changetheequation.org/half-empty]Half Empty As Men Surge Back into Computing, Women Are Left Behind[/url] Jobs in computing have been a ray of light in a gloomy economy. In fact, demand for talent is outsripping supply. Change the Equation’s new data on degrees and certificates in computing shows that the U.S. faces a major challenge in meeting this demand. Men have surged back into computing in the past five years, but women have not recovered from last decade’s slump. We cannot afford to leave half the nation's population untapped

Pamela Auburn
Pamela Auburn
68525 Activity Points

Pamela Auburn
Pamela Auburn
68525 Activity Points

Former NASA astronaut Mae Jemison, the first woman of color to go to space, delivered the keynote address at the "STEM Saves Lives" conference at the National Press Club on Wednesday, Jan. 22, 2014. She urged teachers, professors and parents to make STEM more exciting

Pamela Auburn
Pamela Auburn
68525 Activity Points

Contact the organization Girls in Tech. I met members of the local chapter in Minnesota and they came out to talk with my students about tech careers and schooling.

Matt Nupen
Matthew Nupen
585 Activity Points

I'm a student at FIU and just wanted to say how much I look up to all of you women for choosing to teach! I'm determined to become a teacher and feel so grateful to have women like you to admire and look up to.

Elizabeth Ferrari
Elizabeth Ferrari
2445 Activity Points

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