Elementary Science

Elementary Water Cycle 5E Lesson Plan

I am a college student at Penn State Harrisburg.  For my science methods course we are creating 5E lesson plans and I chose to teach the water cycle.  I will be in a 2nd grade classroom and would love to incorporate this lesson if the opportunity arises.  For young learners, I think hands-on lessons with visual demonstrations are best.  Are there any cost-efficient demonstrations I could create that would help teach the water cycle to students?

Adelynn Baker
Adelynn Baker
320 Activity Points

Hi Adelyn,

I don't know how your question got missed by so many of us in the community forums, but better late than never! A demonstration can always be a good way to begin the lesson (engage phase), but remember, the whole idea of the 5 Es is to provide opportunities for our students to interact with the content in a hands-on, minds-on manner.  So be sure your demo is one that will engage minds and not just entertain them. I love some version of making a cloud in a bottle to begin the weather unit and the water cycle.  There are a lot of instructions on how to do this.  Here's one from the internet: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=G70y90BVes4

There are gobs of ways to engage your future second graders in learning about the water cycle on a budget.  Most activities will cost nothing.  Since you are acquainted with the 5 Es, let's start there:

Christine Royce gives two 5 E lessons on water and the water cycle in her article, "Wonderful Water", Oct. 2015 at: https://common.nsta.org/resource/default.aspx?id=10.2505%2f4%2fsc15_053_02_24

Page Keeley shares one of her probes that happens to be on the water cycle in this article, "Uncovering Representations of the Water Cycle", Jan 2018 at: https://common.nsta.org/resource/default.aspx?id=10.2505%2f4%2fsc18_055_05_18

This article is "chalk" full of ideas to help students understand how water works: Round and Round the Water Cycle by B. Bradley, Feb. 2017 at: https://common.nsta.org/resource/default.aspx?id=10.2505%2f4%2fsc17_054_06_42

You'll see why I put "chalk" in quotes when you read the article :-)

These are just a few ideas.  Surely others will chime in with their favorite lessons on this very important and basic science concept.

Best wishes for a highly successful and effective teaching career!

Carolyn

 

 

Carolyn Mohr
Carolyn Mohr
84233 Activity Points

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