Earth and Space Science

Engaging Students in the Classroom

Keeping students motivated and engaged in the classroom is essential. Engaging students makes all students want to participate and learn the lesson.  Start the lesson with a bang; you can start the lesson with a fun video about the topic, a video of other students doing the project their going to do, a game, etc. This captures the students attention and makes them look forward to the lesson. Try sharing some cool and interesting facts/stories about the topic. For example, if you are doing an experiment that involves Alker Seltzer tablets and putting them into water to show how high they explode, show a video of rockets or create a classroom discussion if anyone has ever made a rocket and how.

Nicole Miranda
Nicole Miranda
350 Activity Points

I agree having the students engaged is the essential tool for a successful lesson. I like the idea of building their curiosity and interest with a video. I love the game idea as well, I am currently in a elementary science course where my professor gives us amazing engagement without teaching the content. This was it gets the student curious at was the lesson/ activities they will do. Some great ideas such a book that you think they will enjoy is also a great engagement. Some non-fiction books from the NSTA website seem really interesting and very informative. Check them out you will find amazing books for all grade levels which is amazing.

Luz Alonzo
Luz Alonzo
380 Activity Points

Hi Nicole, Thank you for this post. It is true that engagement is the key if we want our students to learn. There are some topics that can be challenging when thinking of how to engage students. (For example, when students have to learn about rocks. It is hard to think of something on the spot that can get students excited about learning about rocks). However, technology can help us with different ideas and things we can do to help create that engagement. We need to use the resources that are available to us and keep up with the times!

Claudia Quiroz
Claudia Duca
780 Activity Points

Great idea about the video. I do that now in class. I teach High School and sometimes their focus is on else, other then the topic we are discussing in class. I think using a video to introduce a topic helps set the stage. I also agree there are some topics that are hard to demo or produce in class. A Supernova is one that I can think of, I usually use something from Sci Channel to help explain this. And it doesn't have to be the whole video, you could just use a minute. Whatever works for that topic. I know some good sources of short video can be found on YouTube. There are tons of sources out there like National Geographic, Bill Nye, and NASA these are just some I have used.

Diane Ripollone
Diane Ripollone
2525 Activity Points

Engagement is critical to student's developing a sustained interest in what we teach in our classrooms. With NGSS, phenomena are key. Here is a resource of shared phenomena that you may find useful: https://www.georgiascienceteacher.org/phenomena

Cris DeWolf
Cris DeWolf
11925 Activity Points

Engagement is very important for students while learning, especially in the science class where students may experience confusion with concepts. Being hands- on in the science classroom is always helpful in learning because often times, we have to "do" the project before we can understand project's concepts. Being someone who has rarely had easy experiences in learning scientific concepts, it has always proven more beneficial to me having done activities and labs and then after understanding what was done in the process, learning about the facts behind experiments. As I am in a course for teaching science, I have also participated in experimenting without having had instruction. Doing activities at first will give students the opportunity to work through and exploring the science and then being taught the concepts allows for a more sound understanding. 

Nadirah McCray
Nadirah McCray
3815 Activity Points

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