General Science and Teaching

Rethinking Google Glass

I am at a conference today for CTE, (Career and Technical Education), teachers. We had a keynote speaker that totally blew my socks off – honestly, she said she would and she did. I am a technogeek. I love technology toys and can’t wait to get my hands on them. When Google Glass was first introduced, all I could think of was all of the negatives. Today, my perspective was changed. Corinne introduced us to the possibilities of how we could use Google Glass in our classrooms to change the learning environment for students. The first idea was virtual field trips. How powerful would it be for students to be sitting in a classroom while someone from NASA takes you on a tour of the facility or a new rocket engine, or an engineer working on a model, a doctor explaining a procedure … The list virtually is endless. Here is a YouTube video to give you an idea of the possibilities, http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yRrdeFh5-io Google Glass in veterinary medicine, http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nFQb9UOVgb0 ; healthcare and emergency medicine, http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jnEdaslPtEg I should say, tissue alert on the last video. After watching this, I have new hope as a teacher that I can make a difference by introducing my students to new technology that can be used in all careers and fields of interest.

Sandy Gady
Sandy Gady
42985 Activity Points

This is a new idea to me to use Google Glass in classroom and help learning, and it is a wonderful idea for teaching especially science. Thanks for sharing the videos!

Liang Guo
Liang Guo
1245 Activity Points

Sandy, This is so cool! I love how the one medical video calls Glass, Wearable Intelligence. Do we know how much a pair costs? Carolyn

Carolyn Mohr
Carolyn Mohr
80623 Activity Points

Hi Sandy, I took some time to view all three about the tour of CERNS, the vet treatment for a dog and the stroke patient. I thought of some of the applications I've seen about augmented reality. Certainly seems like a seamless way to integrate the web, data resources and video conferencing. I found the company logo 'Wearable Intelligence' of interest. I was intrigued with having this type of technology be so integrated so that you can take students on a virtual field trip. or have whole medical teams being able to diagnosis and treatment on the spot. Wondered, perhaps, if the last segment was staged as everything went so smoothly in this medical emergency. Maybe this would be an interesting way to be an attendee at an NSTA conference and take others with you? This certainly gets my interest going. Thanks so much for sharing!

Arlene Jurewicz-Leighton
Arlene Jurewicz Leighton
42080 Activity Points

The teaching possibilities are endless with this type of technology! It is exciting to be teaching in a time where kids can go on virtual field trips all over the world! It would be great to have a list of school/teachers around the world that could collaborate together in providing these virtual field trips using google glasses!

Adrienne Aviles
Adrienne Aviles
2145 Activity Points

Adrienne, what a wonderful idea! I hadn’t really had much time to think beyond the immediate use with my own students, but wow, what a powerful tool it could be. Recently my students have used “The Glass,” as my students refer to them to help with their robotics team robot. We tried to work with a Robotics Engineer using Skype and our webcam. While the Engineer could sort of see what we were doing with the camera, it was so much more beneficial for us when my students would wear the glass as they were trying to figure something out and their hands free. The created a short video of the problem area, explained what they had done and were able to show the part up close and personal so the Engineer could see it from their perspective. They sent the Engineer the video, who watched it through their perspective, then guided them on Skype in real time how to fix the problem. Our robot was up and running more efficiently than it would have even if the kids would have worked on it for weeks. The Engineer was able to help them trouble shoot and go down a much more meaningful, productive path. I can’t wait to see what else they come up with. Definitely have to love these digital natives that are not afraid of anything that is technology.

Sandy Gady
Sandy Gady
42985 Activity Points

Hello Sandy! I must say, I had never heard of the Google Glass before reading your post, but I'm on board now! Specifically in terms teaching science, using this resource is not only a fun and interactive way for students to retain curriculum, but to make what they are learning relevant and realistic in terms of their own experiences.

Rima Alsayed
Rima Alsayed
1315 Activity Points

I use "Glass" (great term) for all of my classes, but am certainly not using the full potential of the service. Thanks for the ideas. I'm looking forward to taking my students on a virtual tour. Linking a Google Form as an assignment has been very helpful with assessments. All the results are tallied and students have to log in. Easy grading and nice way to sort based on self-evaluation. For students that think they really understand a concept, I can see how they respond to a particular question/scenario.

George Reising
George Reising
10 Activity Points

I had never heard of Google Glass before seeing this post, but now I'm reading about it! I think it's very interesting. Thanks for sharing.

Bonnie Irwin
Bonnie Irwin
1520 Activity Points

My students are going to be using “Glass” at next week’s FTC Robotics competition. They want to see if they will be able to be able to capture more of the real time movement of the robot as well as making comments on its performance in real time. This of course is possible with any video capturing device. It’s just Glass is so cool they want to use it. It will be interesting to see whether the level of observation and detail raises to a higher level. Today I discovered “Real Student Innovation in Action,” Vicki Davis with Don Wettrick. This is a podcast on “Google Class in the Classroom: Possibilities and Challenges Ahead,” http://www.bamradionetwork.com/index.php?option=com_content&view=article&id=1227:teaching-teachers-with-technology&catid=91:every-classroom-matters&Itemid=259

Sandy Gady
Sandy Gady
42985 Activity Points

I found a new use for Glass today with my middle school students. Traditionally I would bring out my Flip video cameras and video tape students doing a hands-on lab. Generally I would do it so students could see themselves performing the lab and sharing the tape with those that might be absent. Instead, out came Glass. Of course those students on my robotics team automatically knew what Glass was and couldn’t wait to teach others how to use them. I was not at all surprised at the heightened interest. What did surprise me was the level of focus my students had on the lab when they realized if they were wearing Glass, whatever they saw the camera would see. I experimented across the periods and here is how I had the best luck. Students were given the lab to do and one of the participants wears the Glass during the lab. They have to stay focused on what is happening in the lab, following each step with their head so the video is capturing each step as it is performed. The obvious advantage is it is a privilege to be the “Glass,” so with it comes the understanding whatever you are looking at is what the viewer will see and hear. Another advantage is the conversation and discussion that naturally arises out of the use of Glass during the lab. Students were aware what they said was being recorded, so they were a little shy at first with their sharing. When the novelty of them thinking they had to stop and think before speaking wore off otherwise “I might sound stupid,” the level of discourse and conversation was extremely focused and on track. Students were making sense of what they saw by talking about it with each other. Everything is caught in real time and can be saved, posted to a website and become instantly accessible to students. It’s not as good as being there because you miss out on the hands-on part of the lab, but it is the next best thing because you at least get to experience the lab the same way someone in your group/school does. This allows students that are absent for whatever reason to be able to participate in Science if they are missing. This would definitely replace the YouTube video or reading that used to be handed out to those that were not in school. One benefit I inadvertently discovered was the students will do anything to be “Glass.” Some kids that would normally struggle focusing are having to constantly think about staying on task and looking at the lab. They also tend to be more thoughtful in what they are contributing verbally to the class because now everything they say is recorded for everyone to hear. Initially that makes some kids do the opposite and be quiet and not share. After the novelty wears off, they go right back to being sharing what they think. The discourse has improved greatly because students want to “sound smart.” All I have to do is play back their video a couple of times for them to review the lab and they realize how often they have been off task or off topic. I am still learning. Still discovering what works and what doesn’t. But the students are all over Glass like stink on a skunk. They are more accountable for their learning, having higher level conversations and absenteeism is cut way back. Another interesting benefit is students are coming in during their lunches to make videos with Glass so they can share their work with other students that are struggling. Students that are normally shy and not wanting to be heard are stepping up to become a Glass expert. What used to be the “nerdy little kid,” is all of a sudden a hero to the student that doesn’t understand and inevitably may be the football star who is afraid to ask for help because they are “too cool.” What is interesting is when Glass has become a tool to connect students with each other in a meaningful way. It is pretty hard to bully the “little nerdy kid,” when he/she is the one that is helping you, the “cool one,” stay eligible for football.

Sandy Gady
Sandy Gady
42985 Activity Points

Carolyn, great question. One way to get hooked up with Glass is to become a “Glass Explorer.” http://www.google.com/glass/start/how-to-get-one/ will take you to the initial web page where you can either sign up for more information if you are not ready to take the plunge. If you choose to pursue Glass, click on “Become an Explorer.” This will take you to the page where you can purchase Glass directly from Google. As you click through the screens, there are a bunch of options. Glass itself brand new from Google is $1,500. If you go to Amazon, there are a variety of prices ranging from $1,989 to $1,300. Personally, I went to eBay. I like to use the “Buy it Now” option more than bidding, but have been known to lurk and snipe at the last minute. When I do bid on an item, I always enter as my bid the very most amount of money I am willing to spend on the item. Nowadays you can put in the maximum bid and eBay only increases the amount as someone bids against you. I have gotten them is inexpensively as $800.00 What you have to be careful of is you want to get the Explorer XE-C version Google Glass because it has the larger capacity for recording photos and video. The B edition is not too bad either. The earlier Glass editions are available for significantly less, but are a great deal if you are not hung up on the amount of memory. Really, it comes down to whether or not you are willing to download video and photos more often. I have not been able to see much difference other than that.

Sandy Gady
Sandy Gady
42985 Activity Points

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