Distance Learning

Remote Learning and Active Engagement

Being an undergraduate teacher candidate, what are some tips/strategies that would promote active engagement for students that would be useful or helpful during this uncertain time of remote learning? 

Justin Mingle
Justin Mingle
315 Activity Points

What is the age range? Have you seen the NSTA's Daily Do? This is a really neat new resource that is quite engaging. 

Emily Faulconer
Emily Faulconer
4660 Activity Points

Justin,

I recently had an honest video conversation with my students about how much they are learning right now. They explained and agreed that they are just completing the tasks to get the grades and not actually learning. We came to an agreement that if I held "required" class meetings and discussion boards, students may pay closer attention to the material. Also, my students mentioned something about paper. Perhaps requiring them to take notes and then upload a picture? My students mentioned that they missed the organizational aspect of our class notebooks (which stay in the classroom and are still there, unfortunately). So far, the following have worked for me: Edpuzzle videos, virtual classes, and required discussions.

Camillia Ledbetter
Camillia Ledbetter
785 Activity Points

I currently teach physical science and have found my students really enjoy whenever they are sent on a sort of scavenger hunt around their house to find examples of simple machines or even post a video of themselves demonstrating work. I have been using Flipgrid for these sorts of activities, and it seems that most of my students really enjoy these sort of activities becuase it gets them moving and away from just simply doing work at the computer. I am sure this can be fun for other areas of science as well. 

Charissa Barnhill
Charissa Barnhill
1514 Activity Points

Great question, Justin.

I suppose if we answer “What reduces active engagement?” we may get an idea of what we can do to promote it.

I think the main reason that students disengage from learning is because they feel the content is irrelevant to them. Another reason may be that few students actually like work.  Most work out of obligation, expectation, necessity, and in many cases…fear.  They fear facing up to parents, teachers, risking their futures, failure and so on.  Is fear the best way to learn something?  Other reasons may be that students don’t get a chance to use their strengths.  I once had a student who was considered almost illiterate by his English teacher, but he would take home software manuals and come back a few days later as a guru of that program.  He didn’t see relevance in literature, poetry or prose, but he saw relevance in learning every nuance of a computer program. 

There are many avenues to get to the big ideas of any curriculum.  Ask students to tell you their passions and interests and you will likely find some path that may engage them in what you are teaching.  Provide students choices in topics they can pursue to reach the end result and both the student and you may learn something.  As well, allow students to demonstrate their understanding in a way in which they excel: video, music, art, animation, story, and so forth.  

In essence, be flexible by providing flexibility in your lessons.  Consider your students first, then your curriculum.

Hope this helps!

Gabe Kraljevic
Gabe Kraljevic
4164 Activity Points

Hello! I am graduating this year. We were transferred to distance learning three months ago. Now we will defend the dissertation online. But, unfortunately at home, I cannot concentrate on books and other materials. The only thing that brings some benefit in preparing for the dissertation is video tutorials. Therefore, I will be glad if you advise any online resources.

Clement Rudder
Clement Rudder
10 Activity Points

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