General Science and Teaching

middle school notebooking

Does anyone have any opinion about http://snemporium.com/? We use notebooking and have found great success. But we havent had a chacne to study this website. I would love some opinions.

Shannon Hudson
Shannon Hudson
2405 Activity Points

Science Notebooking Emporium is a software application, that when downloaded, places an icon on the desktop of your personal computer. A simple click on that icon opens the application and a vast array of content created specifically for science educators is at your fingertips. The Science Notebooking Emporium application provides educators with a variety of resources, such as, how to create and /or enhance science notebooks, tie-in common core standards and next generation science standards, assessments, literacy, classroom management skills and more direction for inquiry based learning. Simply put, it offers teachers one place for new insights and current educational trends and better yet it is updated monthly. The application is available to any educator nationwide. If you have questions or would like to hear more about specific elements contact- beth@snemporium.com

Beth Leffler
Beth Leffler
130 Activity Points

There are several articles about notebooking I would like to share.


Science Journals Collection
(14 items)

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Analyzing Children’s Science Journals
     -Journal Article
Exploring the Expedition
     -Journal Article

Adah Stock
Adah Stock
101510 Activity Points

I use an interactive notebook in my lesson planning. One of the most challenging tasks for my students is maintaing their notebook - not losing it. I am considering trying to work within a cloud based program, and I would love to try science notebooking using an app or within a technology based program. Does something like this exist already? Has anyone used it successfully? Suggestions?

Susanne Hokkanen
Susanne Hokkanen
79060 Activity Points

I think I like the idea of electronic notebooks, except for doodling. I require my students to illustrate their learning (with stick figures, if need be). And I don't see how I could make that work with an electronic notebook. I wish I could think of a workaround for that. I also struggle with students losing them. Even when I require that they stay in the classroom, they never fail to get picked up along with books and other materials and carried out the door. Ideas?

Kendra Young
Kendra Young
17180 Activity Points

Kendra,

they do sell small drawing tablets that students in a group could take turns using. My daughters have been using them for years and I noticed the last time I subbed in my old school that the technology teacher had one for each station (I was terribly jealous!).

I know there are also apps for tablet computers that do something similar and can be used with either finger or stylus. This article seems to be pretty recent and has information on both tablets specific to drawing and on computer tablets (like iPad) that can be used for drawing.

Or you might consider investing in digital pens where students can draw and the image gets translated into the computer. These might be harder to keep track of, though, but would allow them to draw on paper and the computer at the same time. An article on the benefits and drawbacks is here. I don't know that these are really any cheaper than a good graphics/drawing tablet, though.

Do you think any of these would help with your problem?

Tina Harris
Tina Harris
65805 Activity Points

Kendra, while I have my students take their notebooks with them each day because I just don’t have the storage room to keep them, a peer have come up with a solution that has cut the number of notebooks from wandering out of the room. DG has milk crates turned on their sides, one for each period with each being a different color. On the spine of the graphing composition notebook, students place a strip of duct tape that matches the color of their crate. This tape serves two purposes. One is the tape is neon so it stands out at a glance. The second is, if and when the notebook gets put in the incorrect crate, it stands out and is easily found. Tina, I have used both the digital pens and the tablets with my students. I use the Livescribe pens, http://www.livescribe.com/store/20070723002/c-101.htm?gclid=CJC674-Z4rcCFa9cQgodkVEAyw which work really well if you are taking notes that you want to have the audio to go along with the written notes. You do have to use special paper to capture the notes though. I find my paper through Amazon, or go to Fry’s or Best Buy. The drawing tablets from Wacom, http://www.amazon.com/Wacom-Bamboo-Splash-Tablet-CTL471/dp/B0089VGPII/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1371166664&sr=8-1&keywords=drawing+tablet are useful as well. I have to admit, the one drawback to the tablets is you don’t see what you are drawing except on the computer screen. These take a bit of getting used to especially for students with difficulties with eye hand coordination. I have to admit though adding the technology component has engaged student learning to a higher level than ever before. It’s definitely worth taking a look at.

Sandy Gady
Sandy Gady
43095 Activity Points

Hi Sandy! I already had separate crates, but hadn't thought of the duct taping idea. Will definitely try that out this year! Thanks! Kendra

Kendra Young
Kendra Young
17180 Activity Points

I checked out the science notebook emporium, I like the idea of science notebooking. Where would you start, go to for ideas, and where do you learn more about science note booking?

Michelle Lee
Michelle Lee
2030 Activity Points

Michelle, There is an excellent article on notebooking in the November 2011 issue of Science and Children. The title is "T'was the Start of Science Notebooking". Just put the title in the search engine and it will come right up. Betty

Betty Paulsell
Betty Paulsell
48550 Activity Points

If you are using iPads, there are a number of free drawing apps to allow students to make pictures. I found a discussion of three of them at http://www.educatorstechnology.com/2012/06/7-free-drawing-apps-for-your-students.html. Android users might want to take a look at the Google Play store, where Picasso has been my favorite so far.

Jennifer Rahn
Jennifer Rahn
67935 Activity Points

I would like to see more of the details and examples of SNE online. Also perhaps a free trial would be useful to see how it fits within the curriculum structure. I love the idea, but I think that the price tag of $8 per month per student will be difficult for most school districts to handle. It may be loaded on a single device at a time, so students wanting to access it from home will be unable to do so without a second subscription. It is currently available only for middle school.

Jennifer Rahn
Jennifer Rahn
67935 Activity Points

Very Interesting post thanks for this informative post with us.

Maria Leon
maria leon
50 Activity Points

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