Deborah Bronner

I am in the beginning of a program at Mount Saint Mary's University in Los Angeles to obtain a credential to teach elementary school special education students. Currently enrolled in a course with an emphasis on math and science, I am learning about the ways to engage elementary students in scientific inquiries.

Location

CA

Affiliation

Mount Saint Mary's University

Recent Posts by Deborah

Wed Jan 30, 2019 10:25 PM in Music in Science
Hi Jacquelyn, Music is always an effective way to engage students.  To start a science lesson, find music from a movie soundtrack that relates to a science topic and play it for the students at the beginning of the lesson.  The students will participate in a discussion about how the music makes them feel and how the music correlates to the science lesson.  Additionally, there are songs that have ...

Wed Jan 30, 2019 10:25 PM in Music in Science
Hi Jacquelyn, Music is always an effective way to engage students.  To start a science lesson, find music from a movie soundtrack that relates to a science topic and play it for the students at the beginning of the lesson.  The students will participate in a discussion about how the music makes them feel and how the music correlates to the science lesson.  Additionally, there are songs that have ...

Sun Jan 27, 2019 4:50 PM in Incorporating other subjects into science
Hi Natalie, When students are studying orbits of the moon around earth, I recommend: 1.  Include literature about the moon, such as poetry throughout the ages about the moon; 2.  Lessons on how different cultures incorporate the moon into religious practices; and 3.  How the moon would appear to people in different parts of the globe when they look at it at the exact same moment. 





Recent Reviews by Deborah


Sat Feb 02, 2019 8:27 PM
5 A Kids Inquiry Conference
Paula A. Magee, a clinical associate professor at Indiana University and Ryan Flessner, an assistant professor at Butler University in Indianapolis co-authored an article in which they presented a concept that is an alternative to a science fair. The KIC (Kids Inquiry Conference) is a concept that more closely aligned with the way that scientists share their ideas. A science fair typically requires students to follow a step-by-step experimental process in which they construct a hypothesis, collect data to support or disprove the hypothesis. Often the science fair includes prizes that are awarded to students for their projects. The KIC has a format that more closely tracks a professional science conference. In a KIC, students are encouraged to develop their own inquiry projects, carry out the projects using an inquiry-based model and prepare for a presentation. Participating in a KIC offers teachers a powerful professional development experience. At a professional science conference, scientists share their work, including work in progress, which provides the opportunity to obtain feedback from peers. The atmosphere is not competitive. The authors credit W. Saul, D. Dieckman and C. Pearce with creating the idea of the KIC in a 2005 article. The article details the ways to initiate and plan the process, with examples of projects, community involvement, a sample schedule as well as a section of what was learned from organizing a KIC. The article presents a valuable concept with a significant details of how to implement it.


Sat Feb 02, 2019 8:26 PM
5 A Kid's Inquiry Conference
Paula A. Magee, a clinical associate professor at Indiana University and Ryan Flessner, an assistant professor at Butler University in Indianapolis co-authored an article in which they presented a concept that is an alternative to a science fair. The KIC (Kids Inquiry Conference) is a concept that more closely aligned with the way that scientists share their ideas. A science fair typically requires students to follow a step-by-step experimental process in which they construct a hypothesis, collect data to support or disprove the hypothesis. Often the science fair includes prizes that are awarded to students for their projects. The KIC has a format that more closely tracks a professional science conference. In a KIC, students are encouraged to develop their own inquiry projects, carry out the projects using an inquiry-based model and prepare for a presentation. Participating in a KIC offers teachers a powerful professional development experience. At a professional science conference, scientists share their work, including work in progress, which provides the opportunity to obtain feedback from peers. The atmosphere is not competitive. The authors credit W. Saul, D. Dieckman and C. Pearce with creating the idea of the KIC in a 2005 article. The article details the ways to initiate and plan the process, with examples of projects, community involvement, a sample schedule as well as a section of what was learned from organizing a KIC. The article presents a valuable concept with a significant details of how to implement it.


Sat Feb 02, 2019 8:26 PM
5 A Kid's Inquiry Conference
Paula A. Magee, a clinical associate professor at Indiana University and Ryan Flessner, an assistant professor at Butler University in Indianapolis co-authored an article in which they presented a concept that is an alternative to a science fair. The KIC (Kids Inquiry Conference) is a concept that more closely aligned with the way that scientists share their ideas. A science fair typically requires students to follow a step-by-step experimental process in which they construct a hypothesis, collect data to support or disprove the hypothesis. Often the science fair includes prizes that are awarded to students for their projects. The KIC has a format that more closely tracks a professional science conference. In a KIC, students are encouraged to develop their own inquiry projects, carry out the projects using an inquiry-based model and prepare for a presentation. Participating in a KIC offers teachers a powerful professional development experience. At a professional science conference, scientists share their work, including work in progress, which provides the opportunity to obtain feedback from peers. The atmosphere is not competitive. The authors credit W. Saul, D. Dieckman and C. Pearce with creating the idea of the KIC in a 2005 article. The article details the ways to initiate and plan the process, with examples of projects, community involvement, a sample schedule as well as a section of what was learned from organizing a KIC. The article presents a valuable concept with a significant details of how to implement it.