Deborah Bronner

I am in the beginning of a program at Mount Saint Mary's University in Los Angeles to obtain a credential to teach elementary school special education students. Currently enrolled in a course with an emphasis on math and science, I am learning about the ways to engage elementary students in scientific inquiries.

Location

CA

Affiliation

Mount Saint Mary's University

Recent Posts by Deborah

Sat Mar 09, 2019 12:02 AM in Review of "The Early Years: The Nature of Science in Early Childhood," by Peggy Ashbrook
It is important for a young student to understand the difference between observing and doing.  Teaching the scientific method in a consistent way will help to instill in students how to think like a scientist.  Thank you for sharing the information contained in this article. 

Fri Mar 08, 2019 11:37 PM in Future educator advice
A couple of ideas:  integrate science with subjects such as social studies or literature that you are more familiar with, and which your students may be more familiar with; look for hands on activities that you design that will get your students engaged.

Fri Mar 08, 2019 11:28 PM in Ideas for Science Lessons/Activities
I suggest looking at a website called Voice Thread. Youtube has a wealth of videos from teachers giving lessons.





Recent Reviews by Deborah


Sat Feb 02, 2019 8:27 PM
5 A Kids Inquiry Conference
Paula A. Magee, a clinical associate professor at Indiana University and Ryan Flessner, an assistant professor at Butler University in Indianapolis co-authored an article in which they presented a concept that is an alternative to a science fair. The KIC (Kids Inquiry Conference) is a concept that more closely aligned with the way that scientists share their ideas. A science fair typically requires students to follow a step-by-step experimental process in which they construct a hypothesis, collect data to support or disprove the hypothesis. Often the science fair includes prizes that are awarded to students for their projects. The KIC has a format that more closely tracks a professional science conference. In a KIC, students are encouraged to develop their own inquiry projects, carry out the projects using an inquiry-based model and prepare for a presentation. Participating in a KIC offers teachers a powerful professional development experience. At a professional science conference, scientists share their work, including work in progress, which provides the opportunity to obtain feedback from peers. The atmosphere is not competitive. The authors credit W. Saul, D. Dieckman and C. Pearce with creating the idea of the KIC in a 2005 article. The article details the ways to initiate and plan the process, with examples of projects, community involvement, a sample schedule as well as a section of what was learned from organizing a KIC. The article presents a valuable concept with a significant details of how to implement it.


Sat Feb 02, 2019 8:26 PM
5 A Kid's Inquiry Conference
Paula A. Magee, a clinical associate professor at Indiana University and Ryan Flessner, an assistant professor at Butler University in Indianapolis co-authored an article in which they presented a concept that is an alternative to a science fair. The KIC (Kids Inquiry Conference) is a concept that more closely aligned with the way that scientists share their ideas. A science fair typically requires students to follow a step-by-step experimental process in which they construct a hypothesis, collect data to support or disprove the hypothesis. Often the science fair includes prizes that are awarded to students for their projects. The KIC has a format that more closely tracks a professional science conference. In a KIC, students are encouraged to develop their own inquiry projects, carry out the projects using an inquiry-based model and prepare for a presentation. Participating in a KIC offers teachers a powerful professional development experience. At a professional science conference, scientists share their work, including work in progress, which provides the opportunity to obtain feedback from peers. The atmosphere is not competitive. The authors credit W. Saul, D. Dieckman and C. Pearce with creating the idea of the KIC in a 2005 article. The article details the ways to initiate and plan the process, with examples of projects, community involvement, a sample schedule as well as a section of what was learned from organizing a KIC. The article presents a valuable concept with a significant details of how to implement it.


Sat Feb 02, 2019 8:26 PM
5 A Kid's Inquiry Conference
Paula A. Magee, a clinical associate professor at Indiana University and Ryan Flessner, an assistant professor at Butler University in Indianapolis co-authored an article in which they presented a concept that is an alternative to a science fair. The KIC (Kids Inquiry Conference) is a concept that more closely aligned with the way that scientists share their ideas. A science fair typically requires students to follow a step-by-step experimental process in which they construct a hypothesis, collect data to support or disprove the hypothesis. Often the science fair includes prizes that are awarded to students for their projects. The KIC has a format that more closely tracks a professional science conference. In a KIC, students are encouraged to develop their own inquiry projects, carry out the projects using an inquiry-based model and prepare for a presentation. Participating in a KIC offers teachers a powerful professional development experience. At a professional science conference, scientists share their work, including work in progress, which provides the opportunity to obtain feedback from peers. The atmosphere is not competitive. The authors credit W. Saul, D. Dieckman and C. Pearce with creating the idea of the KIC in a 2005 article. The article details the ways to initiate and plan the process, with examples of projects, community involvement, a sample schedule as well as a section of what was learned from organizing a KIC. The article presents a valuable concept with a significant details of how to implement it.