Kimberly Armstrong

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Recent Reviews by Kimberly


Mon Nov 27, 2017 11:54 PM
4 Thanks for sharing!
Scott, I am all in. Global climate change has always been a topic of interest for me. What is global climate change? Does global climate change exist? Can global climate change be reversed? These are questions that I have been asked and often asked myself. It's funny how often we have heard from people who are very important and somewhat knowledgeable of climate change that try to dispel its existence and affects. In this article, prior knowledge is once again very important and our responsibility as sciene teacher educators is put into question. I wonder at times if you have to believe in global climate change to be able to teach it effectively. Is there room in the curriculum or are we in complete denial for not adding it sooner? This article is quite detailed in its focus, prior physics course, or current physics (table 1) entries. At times the information is quite complex and requires alot of focus. In the Curriculum modification section, a teacher is mentioned that is faced with students bound by stereotypes against science and negative prior knowledge and/or experience. This section caught my eye because global climate change is something that affects us all. The example your gave regarding our societal priveledge being a cause and effect element in global climate change was right on target. When teaching science or the nature of science, helping students make a connection (no matter what the age) with science and their everyday lives is effective way of teaching science. Beginning with the focus question "what happens to water in the world?"is definitely a way to encourage participation and keep students engaged. Using inquiry-based instruction seems to be a common thread for effectively teaching concepts in science. Although the article was very technical and in a higher level of education than the K-12 students that we will be liscensed to instruct, I found the article very interesting and thought provoking. I would love to introduce this to students under my care and instruction. Thanks Scott.


Mon Nov 27, 2017 10:58 PM
4 Help Please!
Shandi, For most people, asking for help is not as easy as it may seem. Once in the classroom the likely hood of a new teacher feeling comfortable enough to ask for help and call upon any available support may not come until it is too late. Fortunately, this article has made that support available without anyone having to ask. Teaching is a learning process for both the teacher and the student and can be hard to manage for both. Being given information that includes effective pegagody, innovative strategies, methods of differentiated instruction and ways to implement and assess that learning, is what makes teaching more effective. Middle school brings about a fear that may take years for any teacher to overcome. It is not easy for anyone to deal with students who are "discovering who they are and their roles in the world". Resistance can be high and acceptance at an all time low. So when given the opportunity to read about ways to reach middle school students and keep them engaged is available, everyone should at least give it a good read. I especially like the intoduction of field trips and the reference to use the National Science Education Standards for a more effective way to reach their goals. With middle school students, survival is a great trait that both the teacher and students to hold onto and having a personal survival guide makes the transition more than bearable.


Mon Nov 27, 2017 10:35 PM
4 "What about the rest of the year?"
Shandi, The importance of engagement has been stressed throughout this entire semester. Finding ways to "draw students in" and "keep students interested" is not as easy as one might believe. Classrooms are not chosen by the teachers. They are given to them each and every year. The time teachers and students spend together is usually calculated and scheduled without their input. In science, the difficulty lies in overcoming the stereotype of what science is not. Most students shy away from science and resist any type of introduction to science other what they "are required to do". So when presented with information that can offer tips and techniques for creative teaching becomes available, I am all ears. In "The Idea Bank", the author Harry Wong provides procedures that are the foundation for student achievement and examples of what to do to "start the year off right". For special education teachers, it is very relevant to note that science teachers today must set the goals abiding by laws and guidelines established by the No Child Left Behind Act and the state and national standards. With the addition of students with special needs, the article makes it clear how valuable time is in any student's life. Starting off the year by stating the rules and the consequences of breaking those rules provides the students with boundaries and the classroom with the opportunity to maintain order. The importance of "taking control" of your class the first week of school seems like a very effective way to create and encourage routines. The classroom remains under the teacher's care and offers the students a chance to reach their higher order goals of deep understanding, inclusion, inquiry and critical thinking. "Starting the Year Off Right" can be a win, win situation if done right. I just wished he had talked about what to do for the rest of the school year.






Recent Public Collections by Kimberly


Kimberly Armstrong: "Being Scientific"

4 Resources

Ideas for differentiated instruction within the classroom that give teachers insight on how to manage a classroom without "managing the student's learning". Classroom management is a strategy that alot of teachers struggle to master and facilitate effective learning. These three collections of journal articles and book chapter provide valuable insight on how to manage a classroom, facilitate student investigations and use technology to explore a subject that they struggle to find accessible and fun.



Tech Trek: Technologies for special needs students
Type: Journal Article
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Success with Investigations: Strategies for facilitating student science investigations
Type: Journal Article
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Kimberly Armstrong: "Science As It Should Be..."

3 Resources

What do you know about the nature of science? What do you think about technology? "How would you combine nature and technology? Did you know that there is power in science? Learning about how we exist in the world and how our existence affects others and nature is something that should be taught effectively within each and every classroom. Students by nature, are inquisitive and the nature of science is about knowing. In the NSTA Preamble it states that "all those involved with science teaching and learning should have a common, accurate view of the nature of science." Do you agree? Disagree? Let's see..



The Power of Educational Robotics as an Integrated STEM Learning Experience in Teacher Preparation Programs
Type: Journal Article
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Light Students' Interest in the Nature of Science
Type: Journal Article
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"Kimberly Armstrong: Science Related"

13 Resources

Here is an exciting collection of journals, articles and science related readings. These readings are composed of a variety of strategies and methods of providing students with concepts of science that are presented in an engaging and scientic way that helps to dispel the stereotypes that we all may have had about science.



The Power of Educational Robotics as an Integrated STEM Learning Experience in Teacher Preparation Programs
Type: Journal Article
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Using Interactive Science Notebooks for Inquiry-Based Science
Type: Journal Article
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