Lindsey Cooper

My name is Lindsey Cooper. I am an Interdisciplinary Studies major EC-6 at the University of Texas in Tyler. I will graduate December 2020. I enjoy teaching and plan to teach lower elementary grades. I love animals, especially my own. I have 4 dogs, a cat, and 40 chickens. I love to read, explore, and go on road trips.

Location

TX

Recent Posts by Lindsey

Fri Feb 07, 2020 8:38 PM in Creatively Engaging Students
What are some good ideas/activities that could engage elementary science learners with hands on experiences that facilitate learning? Any ideas with creativity or arts incorporation would be great!





Recent Reviews by Lindsey


Sun Mar 22, 2020 8:43 PM
5 Article Review #3
Collection: Earth and Space Article: “The Moon in Children’s Literature” by Kathy Cabe Trundle 1. Why did you choose to put this article in your collection? Be specific...."because it looked interesting" is not sufficient. I chose this article because I love to incorporate literature into all content areas when I teach. This article is all about how to avoid the pitfalls of introducing misconceptions when reading about the moon. The moon is familiar to all of us but is the most commonly misunderstood. It is important that we know what we are teaching to our students. If we plan to incorporate children’s literature in our lessons, we need to be sure they are teaching the facts! 2. What new information did you learn? I learned that many people struggle with their knowledge of the moon (something I often find a little confusing), including Harvard professors and graduates. I learned that the book, Papa Please Get the Moon for Me by Eric Carle, was a book that was deemed “educationally sound” had many misrepresentations of the moon. Several things in this book would present misconceptions in students. I also learned how to address the concerns of the misconceptions as a teacher. The article goes step by step to remedy this problem as a teacher. It also provides advice on how to choose the right books for your classroom. 3. What TEKS would it go with and how could you use this information in your classroom? A good, applicable TEK would be the fourth grade standard: §112.15.b (8) Earth and space. The student knows that there are recognizable patterns in the natural world and among the Sun, Earth, and Moon system. The student is expected to: (C) collect and analyze data to identify sequences and predict patterns of change in shadows, seasons, and the observable appearance of the Moon over time. I would use this information in the classroom like the article discussed. I could continue to use the popular books integrating them into inquiry-based instruction on Moon phases. In this method, students first make methodical explanations of lunar phases, then follow up with a comparison of their observations to a book’s illustrations. Students will realize that the illustrations differ from real world, which can lead to further discussion. 4. Based on your experience, is there anything in the article that you agree with? Disagree with? Have questions about? I agree with much of the information in this article. This is a topic that even I struggle with. I agree with the concept that children’s literature should be integrated into instruction. I do not necessarily agree with the statement that non-fiction books are the BEST resource. I wonder how many books I may have read believing they were fact, when they might have not been (as seen by the examples in the article)?


Sun Mar 22, 2020 8:41 PM
4 Article Review #2
Collection: Force, Motion, and Energy Article: “Objects in Motion” by Peggy Ashbrook 1. Why did you choose to put this article in your collection? Be specific...."because it looked interesting" is not sufficient. I chose this article because I thought it was an interesting take on how energy can be applied to children of all ages. There are a variety of ordinary things that can be used to teach the laws of motion to young children. Tops, magnifiers, tweezers, and pipettes are all good options for teaching young students. The article describes how teaching the laws of motion can extend to other areas of learning such as safety. The article also has a lesson in it that provides experience using models to explore motion and force. 2. What new information did you learn? I learned that even two-year-old’s can learn the laws of motion from simple experiments such as spinning tops. I also learned some good open-ended questions to ask about this topic to deepen student understanding. 3. What TEKS would it go with and how could you use this information in your classroom? A good, applicable TEK would be the kindergarten standard: §112.11.b. (6) Force, motion, and energy. The student knows that energy, force, and motion are related and are a part of their everyday life. I would use this information in the classroom much like discussed in the article. Students at this age could experiment with everyday tools and objects and relate their motions with their own lives. They could discuss directions and location when experimenting as well. 4. Based on your experience, is there anything in the article that you agree with? Disagree with? Have questions about? There were many things I agreed with in this article. I do believe objects in motion attract children. This is why it important to teach them all about it! There was not anything discussed that I disagreed with. I did wonder what other simple, everyday things we could use to teach motion to young children and how those things could be applied to other areas of learning (like the safety example).


Sun Mar 22, 2020 8:41 PM
4 Article Review #2
Collection: Force, Motion, and Energy Article: “Objects in Motion” by Peggy Ashbrook 1. Why did you choose to put this article in your collection? Be specific...."because it looked interesting" is not sufficient. I chose this article because I thought it was an interesting take on how energy can be applied to children of all ages. There are a variety of ordinary things that can be used to teach the laws of motion to young children. Tops, magnifiers, tweezers, and pipettes are all good options for teaching young students. The article describes how teaching the laws of motion can extend to other areas of learning such as safety. The article also has a lesson in it that provides experience using models to explore motion and force. 2. What new information did you learn? I learned that even two-year-old’s can learn the laws of motion from simple experiments such as spinning tops. I also learned some good open-ended questions to ask about this topic to deepen student understanding. 3. What TEKS would it go with and how could you use this information in your classroom? A good, applicable TEK would be the kindergarten standard: §112.11.b. (6) Force, motion, and energy. The student knows that energy, force, and motion are related and are a part of their everyday life. I would use this information in the classroom much like discussed in the article. Students at this age could experiment with everyday tools and objects and relate their motions with their own lives. They could discuss directions and location when experimenting as well. 4. Based on your experience, is there anything in the article that you agree with? Disagree with? Have questions about? There were many things I agreed with in this article. I do believe objects in motion attract children. This is why it important to teach them all about it! There was not anything discussed that I disagreed with. I did wonder what other simple, everyday things we could use to teach motion to young children and how those things could be applied to other areas of learning (like the safety example).






Recent Public Collections by Lindsey


Safety (Your Choice)

42 Resources



Hands-On Thunderstorms: Activities to help students and teachers understand thunderstorms and severe weather
Type: Journal Article
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Inquiry Made Easy
Type: Journal Article
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Assessments

22 Resources



Beyond Paper and Pencil Assessments
Type: Journal Article
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"A" Is for Assessment
Type: Journal Article
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Poetry and the Environment: Poetry enhances children's study of the environment and provides a link with science and the language arts
Type: Journal Article
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"Clued In" to Their Environment
Type: Journal Article
Grade: