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Climate Change Here and Now: Coastal, Ocean and Atmospheric Impacts
All web seminar participants use online tools that allow them to mark-up presenter's slides or share desktop applications in addition to engaging in chat with others online and answering poll questions

Climate is an ideal interdisciplinary theme for learning about the scientific process and the ways in which humans affect and are affected by the Earth’s systems. Scientific observations and climate model results that human activities are now the primary cause of most of the ongoing increase in Earth’s globally averaged surface temperature. Climate change will bring economic and environmental challenges as well as opportunities, and citizens who have an understanding of climate science will be better prepared to respond to both.


Two Web Seminars will be presented featuring scientists and education specialists from NOAA. The seminars will focus on the concepts of climate change and the impact it has on various fauna. The presenters will share their science expertise, answer questions from the participants, and provided information regarding web sites that students can use in the classroom. These Web Seminars were designed for educators of grades 5-12.


Each web seminar is a unique, stand-alone, program. Archives of the Web Seminars and the presenters’ PowerPoint presentations will be available through the links on this web page. Learn more about the features of the Web Seminar and read answers to frequently asked questions from participants.


Schedule

Web Seminar I
Date: Tuesday April 20, 2010
Time: 6:30-8:00 p.m. Eastern Time
Topic: Climate Change and West Coast Mammals
Presenters: Siri Hakala and Dr. Mike Goebel

Web Seminar II
Date: Thursday, May 6, 2010
Time: 6:30-8:00 p.m. Eastern Time
Topic: Climate Change
Presenter: Jon Hare

To see more programs on Climate Change visit: http://learningcenter.nsta.org/products/
symposia_seminars/ClimateChange/webseminar.aspx




For more information contact webseminars@nsta.org


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Underwritten in part by: NOAA