Polar Science, Global Discoveries: IPY Research Update for Teachers
All web seminar participants use online tools that allow them to mark-up presenter's slides or share desktop applications in addition to engaging in chat with others online and answering poll questions

Dr. Mary Albert, the presenter for two web seminars on the International Polar Year (IPY) for the National Science Foundation (NSF), the National Oceanic Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), and NASA presented factual scientific information on how climate change affects the environment and our public policies. The first seminar took place on May 1, 2008 from 6:30 pm-8:00 pm Eastern and focused on the science of Ice Cores and what they tell us about global warming and climate change. Dr. Albert showed in her presentation what ice cores look like, and how scientists determine what they tell us. The second seminar took place on May 22, 2008 from 6:30 -8:00 pm Eastern and focused on the how climate change affects world peace, can affect public policies and how the atmosphere is affected by climate change and what that means for communities. Dr. Albert also presented resources for teachers to assist them in teaching this information in the classroom and ways they could get involved in this research. These seminars are designed for educators of grades 5-12.


Each web seminar is a unique, stand-alone, program. Archives of these web seminars and the presenters’ PowerPoint presentations will be available on this web page. Learn more about the features of the Web Seminar and read answers to frequently asked questions from participants.


Schedule

Web Seminar I
Date: Thursday, May 1, 2008
Time: 6:30-8:00 p.m. Eastern
Topic: International Polar Year
Presenters: Dr. Mary Albert

Web Seminar II
Date: Thursday, May 22, 2008
Time: 6:30-8:00 p.m. Eastern
Topic: International Polar Year
Presenters: Dr. Mary Albert



Underwritten in part by NSF, NASA, and NOAA.   National Science Foundation logo National Aeronautics and Space Administration logo National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration logo