Research and Teaching: A Case Study on Reflective Writingby: Xiang Huang and Calvin S. Kalman

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Reflective writing is a student-centered approach widely used in science and engineering courses that helps students develop a holistic scientific mindset. The authors present a multiple case study in two science courses in which students engaged in reflective writing. The authors found that students with higher scores on an epistemology survey tended to use reflective writing in a more effective way to enhance their learning of textual material.

Grades
  • College
Publication Date
9/1/2012

Community ActivitySaved in 21 Libraries

Reviews (4)
  • on Wed Aug 22, 2012 10:34 PM

The article demonstrates the importance of writing at all levels of science education. I suggest you read it regardless of the age level you teach (article is for college level) and think about how to apply the process of relfective writing at your current teaching assignment (regardless of age level).

Susan German  (Hallsville, MO)
Susan German (Hallsville, MO)

  • on Fri Oct 26, 2018 10:37 AM

This article challenged me. Typically, instead of taking notes, I have my students complete a summary over what we have read, watched, or discussed. While this is a skill upon which most of my students still need improvement, I am left wondering how to move my juniors and seniors to a more reflective form of writing so that they can begin to make connections between the different science disciplines that they have studied. The article has proven to me that reflective writing would be a beneficial skill. I appreciate that they do not grade the reflective portion on conventions, rather on the students' ideas and thought process.

Ruth Lehmann Hutson  (Westmoreland, KS)
Ruth Lehmann Hutson (Westmoreland, KS)

  • on Fri Oct 26, 2018 10:37 AM

This article challenged me. Typically, instead of taking notes, I have my students complete a summary over what we have read, watched, or discussed. While this is a skill upon which most of my students still need improvement, I am left wondering how to move my juniors and seniors to a more reflective form of writing so that they can begin to make connections between the different science disciplines that they have studied. The article has proven to me that reflective writing would be a beneficial skill. I appreciate that they do not grade the reflective portion on conventions, rather on the students' ideas and thought process.

Ruth Lehmann Hutson  (Westmoreland, KS)
Ruth Lehmann Hutson (Westmoreland, KS)

  • on Tue Aug 21, 2012 11:29 AM

Perhaps not unexpectedly reflective writing is correlated with higher performance. But how do we get students to write/think reflectively? While the data support the connection between reflective writing and student achievement, we are left wondering if this connection might be more than correlational. If students who do not write reflectively were taught to do so would their achievement increase?

Pamela A
Pamela A


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