Discovering Trees: Not Just a Walk in the Park! by: Louise Stivers

Journal ArticleDigital resources are stored online in your NSTA Library.

An urban classroom participates in a yearlong partnership sponsored by a local botanical garden. Through field trips and classroom activities students observe and learn about seasonal changes in trees and sketch their observations. This partnership shows teachers, students, and families the splendor of the natural world.

Grades
  • Elementary
Publication Date
4/1/2002

Community ActivitySaved in 105 Libraries

Reviews (5)
  • on Thu Nov 17, 2016 4:23 PM

This article was useful to me, in that it described something of a unit plan, allowing the reader to do a walk through in your mind as the group goes through the unit.

Cara Campbell  (Odenton, MD)
Cara Campbell (Odenton, MD)

  • on Thu Nov 17, 2016 4:23 PM

This article was useful to me, in that it described something of a unit plan, allowing the reader to do a walk through in your mind as the group goes through the unit.

Cara Campbell  (Odenton, MD)
Cara Campbell (Odenton, MD)

  • on Thu Nov 17, 2016 4:23 PM

This article was useful to me, in that it described something of a unit plan, allowing the reader to do a walk through in your mind as the group goes through the unit.

Cara Campbell  (Odenton, MD)
Cara Campbell (Odenton, MD)

  • on Thu Nov 17, 2016 4:23 PM

This article was useful to me, in that it described something of a unit plan, allowing the reader to do a walk through in your mind as the group goes through the unit.

Cara Campbell  (Odenton, MD)
Cara Campbell (Odenton, MD)

  • on Thu Nov 03, 2011 3:47 PM

If your classroom is in close proximity to a botanic garden, nature preserve, or wooded area, then this year-long project may be of interest to you. Teachers were invited to participate in a professional development workshop conducted by nearby Descanso Gardens in Los Angeles, California. They were led through the same inquiry activities in three days that their students would complete over the course of the school year. Students (and teachers) acted like scientists by making observations, collecting data, predicting changes, etc. Besides learning firsthand about the seasonal changes that occurred in various tree types, students engaged in inquiry activities allowing them to practice various science process skills. One extension involved inviting families to come on a Saturday where their children became tour guides for the excursion. Students were given an opportunity to share what they had learned as a result of their yearlong tree study. The article provides an example of how nearby science organizations can reach out to share their facilities and expertise with teachers, students and families in their area.

Carolyn Mohr  (Buffalo Grove, IL)
Carolyn Mohr (Buffalo Grove, IL)


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