Start Young!by: Penni Rubin

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If we want to encourage children to enter into scientific fields in the future, we need to give them a helping hand while they are most open-minded and curious. In this article, the author shares anecdotal stories from the scientific community that reveal the importance of cultivating an early interest in science. Who knows? There may be a future scientist or two sitting in your classroom. Suggestions for incorporating early childhood career learning centers are also included.

Grades
  • Elementary
Publication Date
10/1/2002

Community ActivitySaved in 59 Libraries

Reviews (2)
  • on Thu Aug 21, 2014 2:07 PM

This article is a collection of anecdotal stories from the scientific community that highlight the significance impact of exposure to the natural world at a very young age. After interviewing practicing scientists many will say their interest in science started at very early ages with a trip to the beach for example. Included in this article is a layout for a science career centers activity that includes kitchen chemistry, oceanography, botany, earth science, paleontology, and zoology for early childhood students. Also within this article are three other very helpful suggestions on how to expose young children to science in a fun way.

Adah  (San Antonio, TX)
Adah (San Antonio, TX)

  • on Tue Jan 28, 2014 10:26 AM

Adults usually can think back to their childhood interests that frequently relate to what career they chose as adult. Children are naturally interested in science at an early age and should be given the opportunity to explore it in school at an early age….not wait until middle or high school!! The author of this article goes into more depth concerning this phenomenon. She also gives several ideas for science learning centers for young children.

Betty Paulsell  (Kansas City, MO)
Betty Paulsell (Kansas City, MO)


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