The Art of Reviewing Science Journalsby: Daniel P. Shepardson and Susan Jane Britsch

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Science journals are wonderful tools. They offer a glimpse into children’s science understandings, and they are both diagnostic and pedagogically informative to teachers. Examining and reflecting on children’s journal work lets teachers embed assessment in curriculum and instruction; however, effectively analyzing children’s journal writing and drawing takes practice. In this article, the authors describe ways to look at children’s journal work as intellectual and reflective practice and list questions to keep in mind when planning and assessing students’ journal entries.

Grades
  • Elementary
  • Middle
Publication Date
11/1/2004

Community ActivitySaved in 89 Libraries

Reviews (3)
  • on Fri Nov 09, 2012 10:36 AM

Using science journals is a great idea. Grading them can be a real chore however. Deciding what to look for to evaluate student understandings about concepts can be challenging. One needs to look for possible misinterpretations, grade level responses, illustrations that support the concept and more. This article helps the educator to sort out what might be useful to the educator that might require reteaching and or reinforcement and it can also drive future directions to student learning.

Adah  (San Antonio, TX)
Adah (San Antonio, TX)

  • on Fri Nov 09, 2012 10:36 AM

Using science journals is a great idea. Grading them can be a real chore however. Deciding what to look for to evaluate student understandings about concepts can be challenging. One needs to look for possible misinterpretations, grade level responses, illustrations that support the concept and more. This article helps the educator to sort out what might be useful to the educator that might require reteaching and or reinforcement and it can also drive future directions to student learning.

Adah  (San Antonio, TX)
Adah (San Antonio, TX)

  • on Mon Aug 29, 2011 5:33 PM

This article goes over some strategies and concepts that teachers need to keep in mind when they decide to use science journals. They provide some general guidance on ways teaching styles might affect student journal entries and typical entries teachers might expect to see. What I was unhappy to note was that they do not really provide is any guidance on how to assess student journals, except in a vague formative fashion. Information on how to take the information provided and use it to some purpose after noting it was not a part of this article, would have been helpful, especially to teachers just starting out. Still, the list of things to be mindful of is useful, especially for those starting out with journals and seeking information on why they might want to use them and how they might interact with instruction.

Tina Harris  (Fairmount, IN)
Tina Harris (Fairmount, IN)


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