Methods and Strategies: "Inquirize" Your Teachingby: Richard Moyer and Susan Everett

Journal ArticleDigital resources are stored online in your NSTA Library.

The basic elements of inquiry include: ask a question, conduct an investigation, make observations and collect data, use data to develop an explanation, and communicate results. The 5E learning cycle model is very useful for designing lessons that include the above inquiry abilities. The learning cycle includes five phases, an engage that focuses students on a question, an explore where that question is investigated, an explain where the data from the investigation are analyzed and interpreted, an extend and apply where concepts are connected to other concepts as well as to the real world, and finally, an evaluate where the understandings are assessed. This article describes how to “inquirize” a demonstration activity with steps that can be applied to any activity.

Grades
  • Elementary
  • Middle
Publication Date
3/1/2007

Community ActivitySaved in 1573 Libraries

Reviews (7)
  • on Sat Apr 19, 2014 11:07 PM

The Journal article, "Methods & Strategies", provides examples of the basic elements of inquiry. This article describes inquiry methods such as asking questions, conducting investigations, using data to develop an explanation, and communicating results. Content discussed is essential to teachers of all grade levels. The 5E learning cycle is thoroughly discussed and provides valuable information on how to include inquiry in lesson plans. The 5 cycles included are, engage, explore, explain,extend and apply, and evaluate. Clear representation and examples were used to describe how apply inquiry to lesson plans. Overall, this article contains invaluable information that will be useful for all classroom settings.

Katie Marco
Katie Marco

  • on Sat Apr 19, 2014 11:06 PM

The Journal article, "Methods & Strategies", provides examples of the basic elements of inquiry. This article describes inquiry methods such as asking questions, conducting investigations, using data to develop an explanation, and communicating results. Content discussed is essential to teachers of all grade levels. The 5E learning cycle is thoroughly discussed and provides valuable information on how to include inquiry in lesson plans. The 5 cycles included are, engage, explore, explain,extend and apply, and evaluate. Clear representation and examples were used to describe how apply inquiry to lesson plans. Overall, this article contains invaluable information that will be useful for all classroom settings.

Katie Marco
Katie Marco

  • on Tue Mar 29, 2011 10:10 AM

This article describes how to make a demonstration activity into an inquiry activity for students by applying the 5E model of learning. The authors used a traditional cloud formation demonstrate to illustrate the ten steps used to determine if this demo can be modified into an inquiry activity. This is an excellent how-to article that would be very useful to teachers who want more inquiry in their classroom.

Adah  (San Antonio, TX)
Adah (San Antonio, TX)

  • on Thu Jan 20, 2011 9:38 PM

I love the way she incorporates hands-on activities with guided learning. The 5 E's are a brilliant way to compose LP's for experiential learning.

Shayla B
Shayla B

  • on Wed Nov 17, 2010 10:20 PM

This article provides practical advice on how to modify an activity to make into an inquiry activity. It follows the 5E lesson structure.

Kate Geer  (Louisville, CO)
Kate Geer (Louisville, CO)

  • on Mon Oct 22, 2012 4:41 PM

As a pre-service teacher, I truly appreciate this article on how to inquirize your teaching. This article provides structure that a teacher could use in some inquiry lessons, and I found myself seeing how inquiry could be incorporated in more lesson plans thanks to this piece.

Jennifer M Tanko
Jennifer M Tanko

  • on Mon Dec 05, 2011 10:32 AM

I appreciated the application/explanation of the 5E model alongside a real-world lesson. I agree with 99% of the article, except for where it state the most important aspect of the engage portion of the 5E model is to frame questions related to the lesson. I slightly disagree with this - as I believe it is most important to gain student's interest and spark their natural curiosity at this phase of instruction. If you meet that challenge, the opportunity for focused questions will present itself.

Kendra Young  (Lake Stevens, WA)
Kendra Young (Lake Stevens, WA)


Free - NSTA Members

$1.29 - Nonmembers

Login or Create a Free Account to add this resource to your library.

Share