Plants on the Move by: Mary Bricker

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When it comes to directly interacting with and doing experiments with organisms, plants have some distinct advantages over animals. Their diversity and accessibility allows students to use them in experiments, thus practicing important science inquiry skills. This article describes an investigation that was designed to help students appreciate the relationships between the form and function of plant structures as they experimentally test plant adaptation. In this simple classroom experiment, fifth- and sixth-grade students examined and compared different types of seeds and investigated which seeds travel farthest on the wind.

Grades
  • Elementary
Publication Date
2/1/2009

Community ActivitySaved in 703 Libraries

Reviews (4)
  • on Sun Feb 10, 2019 1:51 AM

This was a great article to read regarding plants and why they are a good resource when trying to implement experiments in your classroom. I would love to use the lesson this teacher provided for a future class. It was very thought out and had a lot of great examples to use. The lesson provided simple experiments that require few resources but have a high impact on learning. This lesson did a great job of encouraging out of the box thinking for the students. The questions that the teacher asked the students were also very high-order thinking questions and are great to get a discussion started in your class. This article even provided examples of worksheets that a teacher can use to collect data and evidence of learning. The teacher also provided tips on how a teacher can differentiate the worksheet to meet the needs and different grade levels of the students in your classroom.

Cindy A
Cindy A

  • on Sun Sep 17, 2017 10:08 AM

I thought this was a well written lesson idea. In the future I would love to do this lesson with my students. I feel you could adjust the lesson slightly to accommodate younger grades. I like how this lesson incorporates math and science together.

Adrian
Adrian

  • on Sun Sep 17, 2017 10:08 AM

I thought this was a well written lesson idea. In the future I would love to do this lesson with my students. I feel you could adjust the lesson slightly to accommodate younger grades. I like how this lesson incorporates math and science together.

Adrian
Adrian

  • on Mon Apr 29, 2013 1:53 PM

Fifth and sixth grade students had a resident ecologist assigned to their school, and she decided to take advantage of the marvelous plants in the schoolyard to help students appreciate the diversity and adaptations of the local flora. Students used guides and keys to learn about and classify the plants. Then with the guidance of their resident expert, students designed various experiments that would explore the relationships between plant forms and functions. Students chose to do various seed dispersal experiments. As a result of this activity, students practiced many different science process skills as they learned specific content about some of the indigenous plants in their schoolyard. They got to practice making accurate measurements, interpreting data, and critiquing experiments. They also gained a new appreciation for the burrs that got stuck on their pants and socks as they walked through tall brush.

Carolyn M  (Buffalo Grove, IL)
Carolyn M (Buffalo Grove, IL)


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